making-kubricks-2001

The internet is a treasure trove of material relating to film, but there is an equally massive amount of information that has never been fully digitized. Decades of books and magazines are only partially represented online. Even as Google Books and other services continue the process of porting printed works to the internet, there’s a lot of stuff left to (re)discover. In short, the only way to learn everything there is to know about any given film is to amass and study a library of printed material.

One of the more essential movie books, however, has been made available online. The 1970 The Making of Kubrick’s 2001, edited by Jerome Angel, is long out of print, and will run you around $100 used. (From a seller who knows what they have, at least.) But the book has been fully digitized, and you can read it below. Read More »

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Shining Prequel Overlook Hotel

The Shining has had quite the resurgence in the past few months. Rodney Ascher’s Room 237 is certainly one factor. Another, bigger motivator is Stephen King himself, who is currently working on a Shining sequel novel called Doctor Sleep. Warner Bros., which owns the rights to the Stanley Kubrick film, surely sees this as a perfect time to dust off last year’s idea for a prequel to the Kubrick film, giving it a title and going out to a big time writer.

The proposed prequel is called The Overlook Hotel, and Glen Mazzara, who was the showrunner on The Walking Dead for the last two years, is in talks to write it. Read More »

Christopher-Nolan-Imax-Dark-Knight-Rises

When the name “Christopher Nolan” is attached to a project, anticipation immediately shoots into the stratosphere. That’s what happened last month when the Memento, Inception and Dark Knight director revealed the sci-fi film Interstellar would be his next movie. The film, which once had Steven Spielberg attached, is about “a heroic interstellar voyage to the furthest reaches of our scientific understanding” inspired by the theories of theoretical physicist, gravitational physicist and astrophysicist Kip ThorneMatthew McConaughey is set to star.

Beyond those facts, little is known about the film, but new slivers of information will slowly come to light on the way to its November 7, 2014 release date. The latest one is how Nolan framed his sci-fi film in regards to classics of the genre. Read his quote below. Read More »

room-237-yellow-poster-header

There’s no denying that Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining is a film begging for discussion. A story that seems straightforward on the surface is littered with curious scenes and subliminal suggestions, and wraps up with a final shot that is curiously awesome. Even knowing that, though, you may have no idea how deep the discussions about The Shining can possibly go.

Rodney Ascher‘s brilliant documentary, Room 237, does a fantastic job delving into some of the most fascinating, crazy, and perhaps even true interpretations of the 1980 film. It entertains theories about the relationship of The Shining to Native Americans, the moon landing, super imposition, and oedipal readings. Since premiering at Sundance in 2012, the film has been riding a wave of good buzz and controversy on its way to release on VOD today.

We spoke to the Ascher about that controversy. In addition, our conversation with the director touched on the method of piecing together a the film entirely composted of archival footage, backlash from the Kubrick or Stephen King camps, whether he could do a sequel and much more. Read More »

One of the better movie posters ever made is the Saul Bass design for Stanley Kubrick‘s The Shining. The eye-catching yellow sheet with a horrified, pixelated face was one of the strangest things I’d seen in my young life when I first encountered it in a theater before The Shining opened. It remains a landmark of simple, effective design.

So it makes sense that the doc Room 237, from first-timer Rodney Ascher, would get a poster that ehoes the Bass design. Room 237 features five theories that explore what Kubrick really meant to say in his Stephen King adaptation. The first US teaser for the film referenced a teaser for Kubrick’s movie, and now the poster design follows suit. Check it out below, side by side with the Bass original. Read More »

Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick are famously linked through the film A.I. Artificial Intelligence, which Kubrick conceived in the ’70s, and ultimately passed to Spielberg in the mid ’90s. Spielberg only made A.I. in the wake of Kubrick’s death. While they had some communication on the project, it wasn’t one that could really be called a collaboration.

Now Spielberg is taking on another project originally developed by Kubrick. This one is much closer to the late filmmaker’s heart, but if the current version of it comes to pass, it will be something much different from what Kubrick originally envisioned. (As one might expect.) Spielberg wants to make Napoleon, based on the French leader who was Emperor of the French from 1804 to 1815.

Working from Kubrick’s original script, with the cooperation of his surviving family, Spielberg is developing Napoleon as a television mini-series rather than a feature film. Read More »

An audience favorite film at Sundance and Fantastic Fest 2012 was Room 237, the documentary from Rodney Ascher that attempts to detail and unpack the various secrets of Stanley Kubrick‘s The Shining. What messages did he code into the movie? (If any?) Is The Shining just a great horror movie, or does it really feature a hidden conversation about the genocide of Native Americans? That notion is just one of the theories in Room 237.

IFC picked up the film and will release it later this year as part of its IFC Midnight label. The first US trailer is out (the one we posted last year has been pulled) and it is an appropriately simple thing. It won’t take you long to figure out where this one is going, especially if you’re familiar with the teaser for The Shining, but that doesn’t make the payoff any less entertaining when it happens. Read More »

Matthew Modine was a young actor when he played a starring role in Stanley Kubrick‘s next-to-last film Full Metal Jacket. I’d expect that working with Kubrick would be a formative experience for anyone, but to have such a role at a young age would be a special, life-altering thing. Modine has extensively documented his experience in the film, and now he’s translated his recollections into a great-looking iPad app.

The 2005 book Full Metal Jacket Diary is now available for the iPad, thanks to a collaboration with Adam Rackoff. Check out  a couple videos below, showing off what the app offers. Read More »

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