Donald Glover Lando Calrissian

The final verse of the 2010 song “Fuck It All” from Childish Gambino – the rap alias of multi-hyphenate Donald Glover – ends with this line: “To all my fans who sayin’ ‘Donald Glover ’bout to blow,’ just give me six months so you can say ‘I told you so.'” It’s hard to believe it’s been seven years since then, but Glover has indeed lived up to that promise: the dude has blown up in multiple entertainment fields, culminating with being cast as Lando Calrissian in Lucasfilm’s upcoming Han Solo movie.

In a new profile, the actor speaks about the director switch-up on that film, and we learn some more details about his meeting with original Lando actor Billy Dee Williams. Plus, there are new revelations about Glover’s roles in Spider-Man: Homecoming and Community that fans should find worthwhile.
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fragile masculinity of the mcu

(Welcome to The Soapbox, the space where we get loud, feisty, and opinionated about something that makes us very happy…or fills us with indescribable rage. In this edition: a dissection of the fragile masculinity of Marvel movies, the overlooked homoeroticism of superhero stories, and how everyone can do better.)

The Marvel Cinematic Universe. Whether you realize it or not, it’s considered one of the biggest pop culture institutions defining modern American manhood. Heroes like Captain America, the Falcon, Iron Man, War Machine, Hawkeye, and Thor are considered red-blooded, hypermasculine American men (despite Thor’s role as a Norse god), and even outer space heroes like Star-Lord and lower-rung Avengers like Ant-Man evoke the ideals of fanboy manhood through snarkiness and Teflon attitude.

But all of this is really just a façade for a bubbling societal fear. These characters are archetypes for the fragile masculinity that affects too many men in America. That fear of not being “masculine” enough leads to misogyny, self-loathing, fear of homosexuality, and, at its most extreme, the deaths of gay and trans people (usually trans women).

I can already feel you getting overwhelmed, so let me scale this discussion back a bit to look at the small picture: Marvel and Disney. How does Marvel and Disney’s beloved MCU perpetuate this idea of fragile masculinity? How does it affect their audience? And, most importantly, what can they do to stop the cycle? Take a journey with me as I pick apart the MCU, its men, and why Marvel and Disney shouldn’t be afraid to show them as the vulnerable, soft-hearted human beings they actually are.

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Avengers Infinity War - Spider-Man - Iron Spider Suit

Now that Spider-Man is part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and he’s not forced to fight against any of The Avengers as part of that whole Civil War thing, fans are excited to see what it’s like to have him fight alongside all of the Marvel heroes as they face their greatest challenge yet: the mad titan Thanos.

During San Diego Comic-Con (and D23 Expo), some Avengers: Infinity War footage showed Spider-Man struggling a bit as he joins a fight that’s bigger and more dangerous than anything he’s faced before. Plus, a concept art poster showed the webslinger swinging through part of a triptych image of all the superheroes assembling to battle Thanos. Now, a high-resolution image of the new suit that Spidey will be wearing has emerged online. However, beware that below the image there will have some Spider-Man: Homecoming spoilers accompanying it. Read More »

Spider Man Homecoming Iron Man

Spider-Man: Homecoming was Spider-Man’s big break into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, thanks to a deal between Sony and Marvel Studios. And it was milked as much as possible.

Not only did Robert Downey Jr.‘s Tony Stark play a pivotal role in Spider-Man: Homecoming, acting as a reluctant mentor to Tom Holland‘s teen Peter Parker. It was a clear-cut continuation of their relationship from Captain America: Civil War, in which Tony plucked Tom out of obscurity and a pajama costume to fight in the big leagues against Team Captain America. But Tony almost wasn’t the only Avenger to appear in Spider-Man: Homecoming.

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Spider-Man Homecoming Sequel Director

Spider-Man: Homecoming is a certified hit all around. Not only is it sitting high with a 92% on Rotten Tomatoes, but the movie has already pulled in over $472 million worldwide after being in theaters for just under two weeks. The success of the movie can definitely be attributed to the reboot of the webslinger being part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but one of the main reasons the movie turned out so well is because of director Jon Watts, and both Sony and Marvel have decided to keep him around.
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/Film’s 28 Favorite Movies of 2017 So Far

war for the planet of the apes ceasar and his apes

Over the past few weeks, the /Film team has assembled personal lists of their favorite movies of the year so far, a look at where we stand halfway through the year. But those lists were also ballots, votes for one final article – a complete list of the entire site’s favorite movies of 2017 so far.

Of those six ballots (and 60 possible slots) contributed by Peter Sciretta, Jacob Hall, Ethan Anderton, Jack Giroux, Hoai-Tran Bui, and Ben Pearson, 28 films were named. And that brings us to the grand finale: the 28 best movies /Film has seen in the first half of this year.

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Asgard Church

Since Spider-Man: Homecoming is part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there are plenty of Easter eggs and comic book references for fans. But there’s one that even the most eagle-eye fans never would have noticed, unless they can read Korean.

In an establishing shot of the Thai restaurant that Peter Parker (Tom Holland) and Aunt May (Marisa Tomei) go to – after Spider-Man had some trouble foiling the alien weapon wielding ATM robbers – there’s a sign in Korean next to the restaurant’s awning. And what it says brings about a very interesting development for the people living in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Don’t worry, you can keep reading below without worrying about any Spider-Man: Homecoming spoilers. Read More »

Bumblebee Transformers

The Bumblebee movie has found its male lead — who isn’t a yellow Autobot.

The Transformers spin-off has cast Jorge Lendeborg Jr., who recently appeared in the Marvel Cinematic Universe movie Spider-Man: Homecoming, as the lead alongside Hailee Steinfeld, who will star as a tomboy mechanic who bonds with Bumblebee.

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Spider-Man Homecoming

Spider-Man should be the very symbol of franchise fatigue. It’s a 55-year-old character who has been played by three different actors in six films within 15 years. The last three Spider-Man films were bloated messes largely devoid of super-fun dance sequences. Yet Spider-Man: Homecoming has brought freshness and joy to summer, and to a genre still trying to find its feet. Critics like it. Fans like it. Its future looks as bright as an Infinity Stone.

It would be unfair to mine it for certain lessons (Have a well-established, global brand to use in a movie! Get Marvel to take the creative lead on their own character, who’s a well-established, global brand!), but there’s something that every studio can learn from it, and a few tricks that apply beyond the superhero world.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Spider-Man Homecoming 2

Spider-Man: Homecoming swung into theaters last Friday and emerged from the weekend as the most beloved Spider-Man movie yet. One of the reasons the movie works so well is that it avoids rehashing Peter Parker’s origin story and skips a lot of beats we’ve already seen in other cinematic variations on the character. That includes Spider-Man’s famous “spider-sense,” a precognitive power that gives him a slight edge over opponents and alerts him to danger seconds before it happens.

In a batch of new interviews, director Jon Watts and producer Kevin Feige explain why we didn’t see any specific spider-sense sequences in Homecoming, Feige lays out some breadcrumbs pertaining to the future of Zendaya’s character, and Aunt May actress Marisa Tomei reveals her “horrified” reaction to learning about her character’s age in the comics.
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