In this episode of the /Filmcast, Dave, Devindra and Adam discuss Darren Aronofsky’s latest project, Noah, assess Fox’s terrible summer movie season, and try to determine where Burn After Reading fits in the Coen brother’s filmography. Eric D. Snider joins in to review the film as well.

Have any questions, comments, concerns, feedback, or praise? E-mail us at slashfilmcast@gmail.com or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993 . Join us next Monday as we review Lakeview Terrace with Dan Trachtenberg from the Totally Rad Show.

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Page 2 for May 4th

Here is a round up of stories that just didn’t make the /Film front page, or what we like to call…. Page 2!

Iron Man Concept Art

Hamlet 2 PosterComingSoon has the poster for Focus Features’ Hamlet 2.

The New York Times has a audio commentary slideshow with Aaron McBride, the visual effects art director for Iron Man, describing how the suit up machine was created for the film, featuring concept art like the photo seen above.

Big-time Southern California real estate developer is obsessed with Blade Runner. He recently unveiled plans to hang a 14-story LED billboard on the facades of two 33-story condos a la Blade Runner. [i09]

An animatronic mobile WALL-E has been spotted wandering the Disney parks. [pixarplanet]

The contract between CBS and Cedar Fair (current owners of Star Trek The Experience at the Las Vegas Hilton) ends December 31st, and a spokesperson for Cedar Fair tells TrekMovie “there are currently no plans to renew” it. [trekmovie]

Wizard counts down the 200 Greatest Comic Books of All Time.

Academy Award Winning screenwriter Diablo Cody interviews John Cusak on MySpace’s Artist on Artist.

Iron Man SideshowSideshow Collectables has announced their Comic-Con 2008 Exclusives which includes the Iron Man Archive Set Mark II (pictured right).

Lessons from Pixar’s Brad Bird on fostering innovation in the workplace: “In my experience, the thing that has the most significant impact on a movie’s budget — but never shows up in a budget — is morale. If you have low morale, for every $1 you spend, you get about 25 cents of value. If you have high morale, for every $1 you spend, you get about $3 of value. Companies should pay much more attention to morale.” [kottke]

The first rule of Twitter Fight Club is we don’t talk about Twitter Fight Club!

The Hollywood Reporter says The Descent 2 is going forward with Celador Films and Pathe. Budgeted at $10 million and scheduled for an eight-week shoot with no start date has been announced.

Picturehouse delays Amusement until fourth quarter 2008. [bloody-disgusting]

Paramount Home Entertainment’s Cloverfield topped both the national DVD sales and rental charts its first week in stores. [CS]

The Weinstein Company and Senator Entertainment are producing a big screen adaptation of Capcom’s Clock Tower, directed by Martin Weisz, of Grimm Love and The Hills Have Eyes 2, with a script by Eric Poppen of Borderland. [FirstShowing]

ToplessRobot counts down the 10 Crappiest Iron Man Villains Who Won’t (and Shouldn’t) Make the Movies.

High School Musical 3L Senior Year PosterDisney has released the poster for High School Musical 3: Senior Year.

Is Iron Man the first comic-book movie better than its source material? [spout]

SpikeTV
plays Press Junket Trivia with Son of Rambow writer/director Garth Jennings and producer Nick Goldsmith.

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2
now has a second movie trailer. I’m sure someone out there might care… maybe not. [cinemablend]

The Smallville producers, The CW, Warner Bros. Television, and Michael Rosenbaum announced Thursday that the actor will be leaving the show. [SHH]

James Gandolfini, Steve Coogan, David Rasche and former child actor Anna Chlumsky will star in the political satire “In the Loop” for BBC Films. [THR]

Iron Man has earned $96.7 million in 57 countries since it began opening Wednesday, putting its worldwide total at $201 million after just five days!  [shh]

Sylvester Stallone
Loved Son of Rambow. [wells]

Last week I got the chance to sit down and talk to Garth Jennings, the director of Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy and the upcoming film Son of Rambow. I can;t express to you how wonderful Son of Rambow is. It’s everything that Be Kind Rewind could have been, mixed with Wes Anderson’s Rushmore. I have no doubt that if you see this movie you’ll instantly fall in love with it. Anyway, Jennings told me about his next project, which he is currently developing right now.

“We’re writing our own animated film that we’ll do ourselves. Not Draw it literally ourselves,” said Jennings. “We’re not sure yet how we’re going to render it, be it models, computers, cell or what. We’re just making sure we get the story dead right first, and we’re going to let that dictate how we move from there.”

I tried to press Garth for more details but the director didn’t want to reveal the story details at this early stage.

“Because its at that early stage… It’s not a secrecy thing for us. There is something about giving an idea too much oxygen before you’ve had the time before you actually set it in stone. ~The minute you get it right, you tell everyone because you’re trying to get it going. But before that there is something precious about it. And I’m not superstitious but I feel like if I talk about it too much, or even at all, something goes out the window.”

And if you’ve seen Son of Rambow, then you’ve seen little bits of animation spread throughout the film. Apparently they were planning to render a whole title sequence for Son of Rambow in that style, but it was never completed.

Son of Rambow Movie Trailer

Son of Rambow Movie Trailer

Son of Rabow PosterOne of the best films of last year which won’t hit theaters until this year is Garth JenningsSon of Rambow. The film premiered at the 2007 Sundance film festival and was quickly snagged by Paramount Vantage. The buzz was so high on the movie that I was unable to get into a screening at the fest. Luckily I was able to see the film at the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival.

I wrote the following in my review:

“Jennings’ film almost feels like a Wes Anderson movie, but is, at times, much more playful. It’s about the wonder of a young boy’s imagination. Son of Rambow is one of those movies which makes me remember why I feel in love with movies. It’s the Cinema Paradiso for the next generation. It’s the type of movie that you’ll eventually run on repeat in your DVD player. It’s remarkably imaginative, and both heartbreaking and heartwarming.”

From Garth Jennings, the director of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, comes a magical movie about friendship and the discovery of filmmaking at a very young age. Will is the eldest son of a fatherless Plymouth Brethren family, and is forced to abide by a strict moral code which doesn’t allow him to listen to music or watch movies or television. Will somehow becomes involved with the school’s biggest misfit troublemaker and thief, Lee Carter. Set in the early 1980′s, and partly inspired on events from Garth’s childhood, Son Of Rambow is the title of a movie made by two little boys after watching First Blood (Rambo) on a bootleg VHS tape.

Watch the movie trailer for the film after the jump.
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New Release Dates: Son of Rambow and Southland Tales

Son of Rambow

I’ve said before that Son of Rambow is one of the best movies of the year (read my review here). I feel like I’ve been saying this a lot lately about a bunch of movies, but as the year winds down, you start to gain perspective over the previous year. But to be honest with you, Son of Rambow isn’t actually one of the best films of 2007.

Yes, I lied.

It’s actually one of the best movies of 2008. Paramount Vantage has finally announced a release date for this film which took Sundance by storm. Yes, it first premiered in January 2007 (I don’t know what took so long). Son of Rambow will hit theaters on May 2nd 2008.

And a bit of bad news: Richard Kelly’s Southland Tales has been pushed back yet again. The good news is that it was only moved back a few days. The film will now hit theaters on Wednesday, November 14th (delayed from November 9th) in New York and LA. And the film will expand to more cities on November 16th.

“Yet another delay… but they felt this was a strategic move that would help the film,” Kelly wrote on his blog. “But for those of you who want to see the film earlier there will be many advance previews scheduled for select cities and universities (Harvard, Columbia and USC screenings are being set for late October/early November).”

We’ll keep you updated.

Son of Rambow in April 2008

Son of Rambow

Son of Rambow was probably the biggest hit of the 2007 Sundance Film Festival, sparking a record bidding war, which ended with Paramount Vantage taking home the goods. The film was originally set to hit theaters on July 20th 2007, but was pushed back to an unknown 2008 date without reason. Many people speculated that the studio might have wanted to release the film closer to the release of Sylvester Stallone’s John Rambo. Who knows if that is true or not. I just caught this gem in Toronto and LOVED LOVED LOVED it.

Director Garth Jennings revealed that the film would hit theaters in April 2008 on Friday night at a screening of the film during the Toronto International Film Festival. No further details were given. So there you have it. The film’s official plot synopsis follows:

SON OF RAMBOW is the name of the home movie made by two little boys with a big video camera and even bigger ambitions. Set on a long English summer in the early 80′s, SON OF RAMBOW is a comedy about friendship, faith and the tough business of growing up. We see the story through the eyes of Will, the eldest son of a fatherless Plymouth Brethren family. The Brethren regard themselves as God’s ‘chosen ones’ and their strict moral code means that Will has never been allowed to mix with the other ‘worldlies,’ listen to music or watch TV, until he finds himself caught up in the extraordinary world of Lee Carter, the school terror and maker of bizarre home movies. Carter exposes Will to a pirate copy of Rambo: First Blood and from that moment Will’s mind is blown wide open and he’s easily convinced to be the stuntman in Lee Carters’ diabolical home movie. Will’s imaginative little brain is not only given chance to flourish in the world of film making, but is also very handy when it comes to dreaming up elaborate schemes to keep his partnership with Lee Carter a secret from the Brethren community. Will and Carter’s complete disregard for consequences and innocent ambition means that the process of making their film is a glorious rollercoaster that eventually leads to true friendship. They start to make a name for themselves at school as movie makers but when popularity descends on them in the form of the Pied Piper-esque French exchange student, Didier Revol, their unique friendship and their precious film are pushed, quite literally, to breaking point.

TIFF Movie Review: Son of Rambow

Son of RambowSon of Rambow was one of the most talked about movies at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. But it was one of those films that I was never able to squeeze in to me schedule for one reason or another. Not seeing Rambow is my biggest regret of Sundance 2007.

From Garth Jennings, the director of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, comes a magical movie about friendship and the discovery of filmmaking at a very young age. Will is the eldest son of a fatherless Plymouth Brethren family, and is forced to abide by a strict moral code which doesn’t allow him to listen to music or watch movies or television. Will somehow becomes involved with the school’s biggest misfit troublemaker and thief, Lee Carter. Set in the early 1980′s, and partly inspired on events from Garth’s childhood, Son Of Rambow is the title of a movie made by two little boys after watching First Blood (Rambo) on a bootleg VHS tape.

Jennings’ film almost feels like a Wes Anderson movie, but is, at times, much more playful. It’s about the wonder of a young boy’s imagination. Son of Rambow is one of those movies which makes me remember why I feel in love with movies. It’s the Cinema Paradiso for the next generation. It’s the type of movie that you’ll eventually run on repeat in your DVD player. It’s remarkably imaginative, and both heartbreaking and heartwarming.

When I was in middle school, I saved up and bought a cheap video camera. Me and my friends would get together and film movies after school. The Warriors Through Time, an epic tale that was part Back to the Future, and part Tron, which used all the cheesy in camera special effects that we could discover (for example, making someone disappear by pausing the video, moving them off screen, and resuming the record). We once made this series of films (we had sequels) about a talking hamster, who while his human family is not looking, escapes from his cage and plays in the wonderful big human world. When the family goes on Summer vacation, the hamster must protect the house from a burglar. So yeah, Look Who’s Talking Now meets Home Alone. I’m not saying the movies were necessarily good, but they were fun. They were the reason I fell in love with film and filmmaking. And The Son of Rambow is a romanticized version of this childhood discovery. And no, you don’t need to have a video camera in your childhood to relate. This is a film that I am sure everyone will love.

/Film Rating:
8.5 out of 10

Toronto Film Festival LogoToday I finally found some time to sit down and sift through the 352 official selections of the 2007 Toronto Film Festival. Many hours later, I present to you 65 must see movies at the Toronto International Film Festival. I did the work so that you don’t have to. So why should you care about these films if you’re not making the trip up to Canada in September?

In 1998, Variety acknowledged that the Toronto International Film Festival “is second only to Cannes in terms of high-profile pics, stars and market activity.” Roger Ebert has also said that “although Cannes is still larger, Toronto is more useful and more important….”

Toronto is essentially a preview of which Independent to mid-sized film releases might be big in the next five months. The festival is considered a launch pad for many studios to begin “Oscar-buzz” for their films.

How do I know that you should see these movies? Well, in most cases I don’t. I have seen some press screenings of a couple of the films listed below (Valley of Elah, My Kid Could Paint That…) and can personally recommend them. But for the most part, I have no idea. I have cobbled this list from an exhaustive day of research. Some of the films I chose because of the director, writer, or cast. Others because of the plot synopsis.

When a review was available, I read it. If a trailer was available, I watched it. I’ve included films that were recommended to me by trusted friends. Some films that I missed but were highly reviewed at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival (Son of Rambow, The Savages).

I must offer this disclaimer: I tend to be attracted to American, British and Japanese cinema to a fault. I do have a handful of picks outside my comfort realm, but if you’re looking for more “Worldly” selections, you might have to look elsewhere.

It should also be noted that some of the films (especially in the Gala and special presentation sections) will hit theaters within the next two months. Some films even hit theaters days within the festival’s conclusion. I put these movies on the list because they are movies of interest. But you, like me, might want to hold off on some of these flicks until they hit your city next month. For me, there are some films that I won’t be able to resist like Across The Universe and No Country for Old Men. I know they come out sooner rather than later, but I need to see them sooner. I’ve noted the release dates of films that are opening in the next two months, just so you have that information.

I’ll be at the festival for nine and a half days, so chances are, I won’t be able to see all of these films. The reality is, I won’t see even half of these films. I’ll be doing some interviews, so I’ve lowered my goal to around 30 movies, which most people would still consider extreme (that’s at least three movies each day of the festival).

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