Susan Sarandon Cast in ‘I Hate You, Dad’

Briefly: Adam Sandler is going to play dad to SNL’s Andy Samberg in I Hate You, Dad, and now the same movie is going to see him eventually shacked up with hot teacher Mary McGarricle, played by Susan Sarandon. Sean Anders and John Morris are directing the film, which is about ” a father (Sandler) who moves in on the eve of the wedding of his son (Samberg) and promptly begins feuding with the bride-to-be.” A few more details are after the break. Read More »

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Briefly: Jim Carrey is starring in an adaptation of the childrens book Mr. Popper’s Penguins, which is set to shoot in New York. (Based on some photos I saw yesterday, the film may be shooting now, or very soon.) And now Carla Gugino has taken up a role in the picture.

Variety summarizes the film’s plot, slightly altered from that of the book (of course) as “Mr. Popper is a high-powered, New York buisnessman who suddenly inherits six penguins. Taking care of the animals is no easy matter, and he quickly hits major hurtles, both at home and at work. But along the way, he learns the value of family and friendship–human and otherwise.”

We don’t know Gugino’s role, but it is reasonable to expect she’ll be the female lead / love interest. Nice bump for Gugino if the film turns out well. Mark Waters is directing based on a script by Jared Stern, who rewrote the Sean Anders and John Morris script. There was a point where Noah Baumbach and Ben Stiller were looking to make the film, but if you’re recalling that info, they’ve moved on.

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

Read More »

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

Read More »

Hard to believe that a Kirk Cameron ichthys affair and Disaster Movie will ultimately out gross Sex Drive. After this weekend’s $3 million take, the /Film championed comedy is destined to join the “funny is funny” cult ranks of PCU and Grandma’s Boy. In a smart move, Summit Entertainment, soon to be fat off Twilight, isn’t letting writer/director Sean Anders and co-writer John Morris get away. They’ve signed the duo for an untitled second film, and the premise dances upon a rainbow…

The untitled project concerns a slacker college student who has a child with a one-night stand and is then forced to care for the baby after the mother is killed in a car crash.

In continuing with their previous flick’s auto-related title/pun, might we distastefully suggest Whiplash? The Hollywood Reporter implies that the duo will switch directing duties, with Anders said to be helming…except that Anders directed Sex Drive, so maybe they mean Morris? We’ll try to clear this up. Update: Anders is once the director and co-writer.

I thought it worth randomly mentioning that Nikki Finke‘s industry sources have referred to the $25 million Sex Drive as “a huge disaster,” and—clearly not having seen the film—she adds, “Forget [the film] because everyone else has (and should have).” Why the heavy scorn? The lady likes to bet (and probably needs a good laff), so how about this: I’ll personally pay for her ticket and Red Vines, and if she doesn’t LOL once, I’ll also offer to show up at her apartment in my bathrobe and give her a back massage. Unlike Harvey Weinstein’s $1 millie offer, I’ll make good.

Discuss: So who’s already offended by the premise for Anders’s and Morris’s follow-up?

Hunter Stephenson’s Movie Review: Sex Drive

Three things you should know about Sex Drive: 1) A whore nearly shits on Clark Duke. 2) It’s one of the funniest movies of 2008. 3) It doesn’t carry a Judd Apatow hall-pass.

And if the word of mouth explodes on this flick, it might be hailed commercially as the new American Pie (whatever that means) right in time for total economic collapse. Admittedly, like your own, my expectations were really low for this movie, comparable to those for Nick & Norah: Die, and that was before I found out Fall Out Boy had a cameo. That was before I paid enough attention to realize the title was a pun. That was before I went to Momofuku Ko for free and got a free massage. The only reason why this movie was on my movie radar was the presence in the unfunny trailers of Clark Duke, a shapely young actor who starred in the addictive web series, Clark and Michael, opposite Michael Cera.

But after seeing Sex Drive, Clark Duke is officially a star. And he’s a star who’s open to “dude, you look like a chick” jabs courtesy of Brian Posehn. And he’s the highlight of an R-rated teen-sex comedy because he bangs everything that moves, including the Amish.

This is not a comedy you should read five reviews on, even if you’re bored. It follows the adventures of a proto-Last American Virgin named Ian (Josh Zukerman, awesome here) who steals a ’69 GTO and bounces around with his pussy-magnet best bud (Duke) and his best girl/crush (Amanda Crew, funny)—the Ferris Bueller equation. Talented youngs, all. And, as confidently co-written and directed by Sean Anders, the movie never forgets the sparkly cast chemistry and off-the-cuff banter of ‘80s flicks like Fast Times, Weird Science and License to Drive, even while piling on supremely gross sight-gags from the late ‘90s, ‘00s agreeable YouTube segues, and lots of ‘20s “Fag!”s. This is a cast you’ll want to stay with after, even if the didactic ending kinda bails—and did we really need the cliché “that explains the bigotry?” safety net?

James Marsden destroys as the older, alpha brother to Zuckerman’s bashful Ian. His character, Rex, has drawn early comparisons to Bill Paxton’s Chet (and Lee Tergesen’s), but also possesses the jock heart of Brand in The Goonies. When guns are drawn and the film’s plot goes madcap, Rex joins the party rather than squashing it. The preview audience ate-it-up. Marsden is swell at physical comedy—making you feel sorry for a garage door—and whenever he’s on screen he offers a jolt of violent anticipation. His one-liners aren’t bad either. When informing his brother that he “looks like a Mexican butthole,” in the context of the scene it’s both an endearing, painfully wrong and acute observation. To the pantheon of movie jerks he goes.

So much current mainstream comedy walks an awkward, paranoid tight rope—see SNL being censored by billionaire stiffs—and Sex Drive is refreshing because Anders and co-writer John Morris seem blissfully unawares here. This is Anders’s second film following a little seen 2005 Christian rock spoof, and due to the success of Superbad, it could have been predictably stuffed with pseudo-shocking cock jokes. Instead, nothing is off limits if it scores a laugh, as it should be. Christians get beaved, grandma, cancer, abstinence and suicide are up for grabs, and I think there’s an Elvis Mitchell doppelganger at the end. A talking Jean Claude Van Damme poster? Sure. Unlike the second Harold and Kumar, the jokes aren’t stitched together to mock yet casually simmer in the cultural climate; compared to a few of this summer’s high profile comedies, the bromance on display doesn’t fill the air like congratulatory cigar smoke.

When Clark Duke assures an incarcerated black dude that he’ll check out his rap MySpace page, it’s Zen-like. Suddenly it’s as if you’re peering into a future of countless afternoons spent enjoying Sex Drive on Comedy Central instead of getting dressed or blankly watching your roommate clean-up. For me, that’s an all too rare accomplishment for a film. And congrats to those involved for The Wraith homage set to Kenny Loggins’s “Danger Zone.”

8.5/10

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