I’ve always been one who appreciates Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre at arm’s length; it’s a great book, an indisputable classic, but not one for which I’ve got some real passion. So a new film version isn’t something I would expect to be excited to see. Enter Cary Fukunaga, the director of the wonderful Sin Nombre, who shot his verion of Jane Eyre this year.

His film based on the novel is set to release March 11, 2011, with Mia Wasikowska in the title role and Michael Fassbender as Rochester, the man who employs Jane and with whom she falls in love. The film also boasts Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins, Imogen Poots, Holliday Grainger and Tamsin Merchant. And now it has an excellent poster, which you can see in full after the break. Read More »

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TIFF Movie Review: Richard Ayoade’s Submarine

Richard Ayoade‘s Submarine is the kind of film I hope to discover at film festivals and share with friends.

Based on the Curtis Brown Prize-winning novel by Joe Dunthorne, this dark indie comedy is about a 15-year-old boy who “must fight save his mother from the advances of a mystic and simultaneously lure his eczema-strafed girlfriend in to his bedroom.” It is a coming of age story which is equal parts Rushmore, Election and Squid and the Whale.

I really hope that Fox Searchlight picks this film up and markets it to the masses, as it deserves to be seen (lets hope that Sony Pictures Classics stays away from this one). Write the title of this film down right now or add it to your netflix queue (if that’s even possible), because you’re gonna wanna see it when it becomes available.

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Telluride Review: Mark Romanek’s Never Let Me Go

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A lot of you probably might not recognize Mark Romanek‘s name, but you’ve almost certainly seen his work. He was probably one of the best music video directors to come out of the 1990′s. His videos have included Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer”, “Scream” – Michael Jackson’s grammy award winning collaboration with sister Janet Jackson (at $7 million, it might forever hold the title as the most expensive music video ever made), Janet Jackson’s “Got ‘Til It’s Gone”, Johnny Cash’s gut-wrenching cover of Nine Inch Nails’ “Hurt”, En Vogue’s “Free Your Mind”, Lenny Kravitz’s “Are You Gonna Go My Way”, Beck’s “Devil’s Haircut”, Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” and Fiona Apple’s “Criminal”.

His 2002 feature film One Hour Photo is probably best known for Robin Williams’ dramatic turn. While the film is beloved by cinephiles, it pretty much went under the radar of mainstream audiences. It did however gain Romanek a lot of the respect in the movie industry. His follow-up, a big screen adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro‘s novel Never Let Me Go, premiered at the 37th Telluride Film Festival. The book was named one of TIME’s 100 Best Novels (from 1923 to the Present), featured on many top ten books of 2005 lists, and a finalist in the National Book Critic Circle Award.

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This is more like it. The visual marketing for Never Let Me Go, Mark Romanek‘s adaptation of the Kazuo Ishiguro novel, has been represented by a primary one-sheet which is pretty, but  maybe not quite right. This trio of new character posters is a lot better. Still a beautiful look at the film, but a lot more unusual than the first poster. See each in greater detail after the break. Read More »

Photos: Mark Romanek’s ‘Never Let Me Go’

Fox Searchlight has released a batch of new production photos for Mark Romanek‘s big screen adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro‘s novel Never Let Me Go. The book was named one of TIME’s 100 Best Novels (from 1923 to the Present), featured on many top ten books of 2005 lists, and a finalist in the National Book Critic Circle Award. For those interested, you can buy the softcover for only $11.20 on Amazon.

Beach author and 28 Days Later/Sunshine screenwriter Alex Garland penned the adaptation for the dramatic thriller, about a group of children who spent their childhood at a seemingly idyllic English boarding school, who as they “grow into young adults, they find that they have to come to terms with the strength of the love they feel for each other, while preparing themselves for the haunting reality that awaits them.” The film stars Carey Mulligan, Keira Knightley, Andrew Garfield, Charlotte Rampling, Sally Hawkins, Nathalie Richard, and Andrea Riseborough. Watch the trailer here. Hit the jump to see the new photos.

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Never Let Me Go to Open BFI London Film Festival

Briefly: The BFI London Film Festival is getting a little bigger every year. Last year it was given a push when Wes Anderson’s Fantastic Mr. Fox debuted at the fest. This year, the festival will open on October 13 with the European premiere of Mark Romanek‘s new film Never Let Me Go, which adapts the novel of the same name by Kazuo Ishiguro.

That isn’t the film’s world premiere, as it will first bow at the Toronto International Film Festival, but it’s a good booking for the London fest regardless. Doesn’t hurt that there’s a lot of British talent on board, among them screenwriter Alex Garland and cast Andrew Garfield, Carey Mulligan and Keira Knightley. (The film will already be open in the US by the time of this showing; it hits Stateside screens on September 15, right after the TIFF premiere.)

There’s a solid if low-key buzz on the film, which looks like a lush, smart take on Ishiguro’s novel, even if some of the marketing might be trying to trick us into thinking it’s a bit more overtly sci-fi than the film likely is. Regardless, can’t wait to see this one; check out the trailer if you haven’t already.

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I hadn’t seen a proper projection of the trailer for Mark Romanek‘s new film, Never Let Me Go, until I sat through the Trailer Park exhibition in Hall H at the San Diego Comic Con. Talk about weird — Romanek’s very quiet movie was sandwiched in between a lot of big-ticket films, and the contrast was pretty striking. (Plus, it was amusing to hear nearly the entire hall whisper ‘that’s the new Spider-Man,’ not when Andrew Garfield‘s face was shown, but when his credit was written on screen.)

Now there’s a new poster for the film, and the image captures some of the idea of hope and escape that permeates the latter half of the trailer. Read More »

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?

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