Briefly: Woody Allen continues to work at a pace that other directors can only dream of. He’s following To Rome With Love with a new film that stars Alec Baldwin, Cate Blanchett, Bobby Cannavale, Louis C.K., Andrew Dice Clay, Sally Hawkins, Peter Sarsgaard and now Michael Stuhlbarg. And now the movie has a title, Blue Jasmine, and a distribution deal with Allen’s regular partner Sony Pictures Classics.

Allen scripted (of course) and the film follows “the final stages of an acute crisis and a life of a fashionable New York housewife.” In form typical to the director, that’s just about all we know beyond the cast roster. We do know the film will shoot in the US, making it the director’s first film at home since the 2009 release Whatever Works. The fact that this will be Allen’s fourth movie since that picture came out is a testament to his wonderfully relentless work habit. [THR]

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Woody Allen‘s latest film will be his first to shoot in the US in almost a decade, but that might not be the big reason to pay attention to it. The film just added three cast members, and they’re quite a set. One of them is a great surprise: Louis C.K., a man we know is a fan of Allen’s work if only for the homage he paid Manhattan in the third season of Louie. Another is also a surprise, but a much more surreal one: Andrew Dice Clay, whose comic sensibility is everything a classic Allen character would claim to hate, but might secretly love. Then, to balance things out, we have Peter Sarsgaard.

A bit more info on the film follows. Read More »

Rob Corddry and Leslie Bibb may seem like an unlikely couple, but they’ll be united in the fight against a demonic child in Hell Baby. Scripted and directed by Night at the Museum writers Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant, the comedy centers around a pregnant woman and her husband (Bibb and Corddry) who move into a dilapidated haunted house in New Orleans. In an effort to keep from having a demonic baby, they call upon the Vatican’s crack exorcism team, played by Lennon and Garant. Bet that’ll go well. Production will begin in New Orleans next month. [Variety]

After the jump, Clark Duke becomes Adam Scott’s kid brother, and Paul Rudd and Paul Giamatti pull Amy Landecker into their Christmas tree scheme.

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The theme of this Casting Bits seems to be “rising stars,” as All My Children‘s Ambyr Childers stakes out a spot in an all-star cast, War Horse star Jeremy Irvine leads a movie starring Britain’s finest, and Thor actress Jaimie Alexander signs on to co-star with the Governator himself. Read more after the jump.

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‘Submarine’ Trailer

Here’s the trailer for Submarine, the British film that has been killing at festivals since it debuted at TIFF last year. Peter loved it there, and David loved it at Sundance. Check out the trailer — which certainly has some familiar notes from other big indie success stories — and leave your thoughts after the break. Read More »

Focus Features has dropped new images from two of the company’s more promising 2011 films: Lone Scherfig‘s One Day and Cary Fukunaga‘s Jane Eyre.

That’s the new Jane Eyre image, above, showing Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender as the lead characters of Charlotte Brontë‘s famous novel. We’ve seen one trailer already (and it was pretty wonderful, check it if you missed that post) but this image is notable for showing the characters in a serene, even tender moment.

Get more info on Jane Eyre and see the images from One Day, after the break. Read More »

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I’ve always been one who appreciates Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre at arm’s length; it’s a great book, an indisputable classic, but not one for which I’ve got some real passion. So a new film version isn’t something I would expect to be excited to see. Enter Cary Fukunaga, the director of the wonderful Sin Nombre, who shot his verion of Jane Eyre this year.

His film based on the novel is set to release March 11, 2011, with Mia Wasikowska in the title role and Michael Fassbender as Rochester, the man who employs Jane and with whom she falls in love. The film also boasts Jamie Bell, Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins, Imogen Poots, Holliday Grainger and Tamsin Merchant. And now it has an excellent poster, which you can see in full after the break. Read More »

TIFF Movie Review: Richard Ayoade’s Submarine

Richard Ayoade‘s Submarine is the kind of film I hope to discover at film festivals and share with friends.

Based on the Curtis Brown Prize-winning novel by Joe Dunthorne, this dark indie comedy is about a 15-year-old boy who “must fight save his mother from the advances of a mystic and simultaneously lure his eczema-strafed girlfriend in to his bedroom.” It is a coming of age story which is equal parts Rushmore, Election and Squid and the Whale.

I really hope that Fox Searchlight picks this film up and markets it to the masses, as it deserves to be seen (lets hope that Sony Pictures Classics stays away from this one). Write the title of this film down right now or add it to your netflix queue (if that’s even possible), because you’re gonna wanna see it when it becomes available.

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neverletmegoposter-slice

A lot of you probably might not recognize Mark Romanek‘s name, but you’ve almost certainly seen his work. He was probably one of the best music video directors to come out of the 1990’s. His videos have included Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer”, “Scream” – Michael Jackson’s grammy award winning collaboration with sister Janet Jackson (at $7 million, it might forever hold the title as the most expensive music video ever made), Janet Jackson’s “Got ‘Til It’s Gone”, Johnny Cash’s gut-wrenching cover of Nine Inch Nails’ “Hurt”, En Vogue’s “Free Your Mind”, Lenny Kravitz’s “Are You Gonna Go My Way”, Beck’s “Devil’s Haircut”, Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” and Fiona Apple’s “Criminal”.

His 2002 feature film One Hour Photo is probably best known for Robin Williams’ dramatic turn. While the film is beloved by cinephiles, it pretty much went under the radar of mainstream audiences. It did however gain Romanek a lot of the respect in the movie industry. His follow-up, a big screen adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro‘s novel Never Let Me Go, premiered at the 37th Telluride Film Festival. The book was named one of TIME’s 100 Best Novels (from 1923 to the Present), featured on many top ten books of 2005 lists, and a finalist in the National Book Critic Circle Award.

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