James Cameron Joins Heavy Metal

james cameron heavy metal
Last we heard, Kevin Eastman‘s new big screen Heavy Metal movie had a list of impressive directors a mile long: Zack Snyder, David Fincher, Mark Osborne (Kung Fu Panda), and Gore Verbinski (Pirates of the Caribbean trilogy). Eastman has said that three more directors would also direct segments on the animated anthology film. Since that time we’ve learned that Rob Zombie (Halloween) is in talks to join the mix.

But now our good friends at Film School Rejects have learned directly from Eastman that James Cameron has now come on board as Co-Executive producer, and will direct a segment. Cameron’s involvement is also notable because it pretty much guarantees that the film will be 3D. It was also revealed that Jack Black would be part of Kung Fu Panda helmer Mark Osborne’s comedy segment, although it was elaborated on if he would provide a voice, write, or even co-direct. Eastman says that the three other directors (one of which we assume is the previously mentioned Zombie), who have agreed but haven’t officially signed on, “are equally as jaw-dropping.” I do remember that Guillermo Del Toro‘s name was initially on the list, but the filmmaker became too busy.

Discuss: Who else would you like to see involved in a new Heavy Metal movie?

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Dimension Films has released a behind the scenes featurette for H2 on YouTube. The video explains that Rob Zombie‘s Halloween sequel is unlike anything you have seen before in the series, and is a lot more realistic. If that’s a good thing or not, I’m not quite sure. I wasn’t really a fan of Zombie’s remake. Watch the clip after the jump.

Also of note, the film was titled H2 but all the titling on Dimension’s official YouTube page reads “Halloween II“. Have they decided to revert back to the full franchise name? Did I miss the memo? The H2 title always seemed like a horrible marketing decision. I understand that Zombie is doing everything he can to distinguish this from the original movies, but mainstream America needs to see the word “Halloween.”
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In the second installment of /Film’s in-depth chat with Rob Zombie, we discuss the limp yet horny state of the American horror film. Zombie also rants on why getting original projects made in Hollywood has become a lamer development hell. Given that his last theatrical movie as a writer/director was a remake (Halloween), and that this summer’s H2 (Halloweeen 2) is a sequel, it’s interesting to hear Zombie get the lead out in such bold fashion. But consider that a release for his $10m animated film with Paul Giamatti, The Haunted World of El Superbeasto, is on the burner indefinitely; and that his T-Rex—a violent ’70s-set flick about a heathen war vet/boxer—now revs at a yellow-light. The status of both projects is discussed below.

While Zombie’s vision for Michael Myers has proven divisive, the privilege to re-shape one of the top three monsters of modern horror was well-earned. His directorial debut, 2003′s House of 1000 Corpses, has held up nicely in the years since; a fun-house experience akin to falling down a broken disposal, Corpses wallows in the slime of decades’ worth of deranged genre influence.  2005 brought his signature film, The Devil’s Rejects, arguably the most nefarious celluloid celebration of murder and nihilism set loose in theaters this decade. Four years later, even he’s a little surprised that it exists. But exists it does; a major studio picture that feels like the extroverted, distant Southern cousin to William Lustig‘s ode to the NYC lurker Maniac.

Rejects solidified Zombie as the rare, talented filmmaker sitting high on the pop-cult ladder whose work craps on any and all moral barometers. And after speaking at length, we’re convinced that there isn’t a working director in the U.S. more dedicated to the hard-R picture-show. (Click here for Part 1)

Hunter Stephenson: How you depict violence on film sets you apart. It seems like much of the violence in American horror films these days, it’s very routine and mundane. A lot of the violence in your films seems flat-out wrong, but in a really good way. [Zombie laughs] You were never part of the torture-porn trend, when Hostel and Saw came out, and what not.

When you show violence on screen, it serrates but then you move on, and I think it’s very effective. I’m wondering, what films do you watch to get your kicks for violence? What films do you draw on when you’re making them?

Rob Zombie: Well, I like when violence seems real and I like when it seems ugly. I like when the act doesn’t seem fun. I was never a fan of ‘80s slasher movies. I think they are cartoony and silly. I was more into the violence in movies like Taxi Driver, The Wild Bunch, and Bonnie and Clyde. The violence in those films makes a statement in some way. You know what I mean? It’s saying something. And it’s either brutal, or depressing, or it’s real. But it’s never fun.

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Last month, /Film visited the set of H2 (Halloween 2). After flying into Atlanta, Georgia, a colleague and I followed a publicity firm’s map and drove far out into the country, down winding roads encased by high trees that exhaled into healthy farmland. The sun was setting, the temperature was cooling, and our cell phones were no longer getting reception. We were lost. We finally came to a local cop car blocking a road, lights on spin. The cop exited—he was alive—and said, “Here for the movie?” and pointed us in the direction of Haddonfield, a fictional town that millions of people all over the world have watched Michael Myers terrorize for years.

Since 2007, the grisly lore of Haddonfield has rested in the determined hands of writer/director Rob Zombie. And in my opinion, so does the current state and fate of the American horror film, an institution predictably oft-sniffed at, but that is vital to our culture. As exemplified in our epic interview—divided into two parts—Zombie is a filmmaker who is unapologetically forthright about detractors of his vision for Halloween and horror, and much more. There is great irony to be found in that so many 20somethings wake up to Zombie’s music cuing The Howard Stern Show, and that the same guy is creating cinema that aspires to haunt our grandkids’ nightmares more so than the last president. (Click here for part two of the interview.)

Hunter Stephenson: In December, it was officially announced that you were on board for the sequel. So, between then and the release date this August, you have had to write, cast, prep, shoot and now you guys are editing. That’s such a small window. When you first sat down to write the script, where did you want to go with Myers and this new mythology you created?

Rob Zombie: Well, I looked back at the first film and I thought, What would be the most realistic fall-out from the events that occurred previously? So, I started with Laurie Strode. The reality now is this: here is a girl who wakes up, her parents are murdered, most of her friends are murdered, and she finds out her brother is the person who killed everybody. What is the reality of that? What does that do to a person? I felt it would be much more interesting this time to make Laurie this dark, damaged character. And everyone else too.

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We’ll be posting my rather epic interview today with Rob Zombie shortly. In the meantime, here’s an excerpt in which he clears up misconceptions surrounding Michael Myers “mask-less ratio” in H2 (Halloween 2). You may recall previous reports that Myers will go mask-less for 70% of the film. But as Zombie emphasized in good humor, the editing process has just started on the sequel, rendering the figure moot…

/Film: I think what has sparked the most controversy so far over the sequel is the mask. Once that statistic hit the Net that had Michael only wearing the mask for 30% of the movie, it was on. To be honest, it sounded like bullshit to me, so I didn’t report it. …Would you care to clarify?

Rob Zombie: It is total bullshit. [laughs] See, I think Wayne Toth [SFX] said [70% mask-less] when you guys were down on the set. Wayne wasn’t bullshitting you, but that was taken out of context, and to an extreme [online]. We’ve filmed so much stuff and at this point nobody but me knows what we’re going to use or not use. There are more shots of Michael Myers running around in his mask in this movie than in any of the other movies. I don’t think anybody has to worry. Yeah. Michael Myers never looked so good. [laughs]

Zombie also expressed complete disdain for all prior Halloween sequels, calling them “pathetic.” It’s a pretty candid interview. Some fans will be disappointed to learn that Tyrannosaurus Rex will most likely not be Zombie’s next film due to—per the interview—Hollywood’s current appetite for unoriginal, toned-down fare. After the jump we have the latest one-sheet for H2, released today.

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A Better Look at Michael Myers’ New Mask in H2

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Dimension Films has released our first high resolution look at Michael Myers; new mask in Rob Zombie‘s Halloween sequel H2. As you can see, the mask is ripped, revealing more of actor Tyler Mane‘s face. I’m not sure I like it. One of the big reasons I think people found Myers scary is because they can’t see his face. The mask offered a creepy soulless face that stares blankly and never blinks. And now that they can see behind the mask, it not only makes the whole idea of a mask pointless, but takes away most of that unknown creepiness. Check out the full photo after the jump.

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The first trailer for Rob Zombie‘s H2 has premiered on Yahoo Movies. The nitpicking over canon is inevitable, but I find this trailer to be quite strong and, in parts, genuinely unsettling. Zombie clearly isn’t preoccupied with horny teens, and for the horror genre, that’s a damn good thing. The many looks of Michael Myers in the film are glimpsed. From the cloaked “giant,” to the new version of the mask (which is weathered, almost Ed Gein-esque), alongside flashbacks of young Michael, and even stranger shots near the end, it’s all here.

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Rob Zombie‘s MySpace account handlers have been getting busy with the H2 image posting of late. This morning, not only did the MySpacemeisters post a new picture of Shape-looking Shatner-masked Mike Meyers lurking about in a basement, they also seemed to slip and slap up a second, altogether more interesting image of Myers in his tramp rags, coming face to face with a rather interesting young character…

Of course, that image only lasted a matter of seconds on the site before being yanked… but caches are wonderful things, and after the break, I’ll present both of the pictures to you.

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