Park Chan-Wook‘s Stoker is one of the film’s we’re most keen to see in the early months of 2013; the English-language debut of the director behind Thirst and the “Vengeance Trilogy” (Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, Sympathy for Lady Vengeance) holds a lot of appeal. That’s in part due to Park’s wonderful work with the camera and actors, as seen in most of his previous films. But there’s also the appeal of him tackling a story with explicit Hitchcock references and a talented cast that includes Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, and Matthew Goode, the three of whom play a strange family unit that comes together in the aftermath of a death in the family.

The first teaser poster for the film artfully brings together some of the story elements, and corrals them in a stark frame of thorny growth that aptly visualizes the characters’ twisted entanglements. Check it out in full below, along with a video showing the poster’s creation. Read More »

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The core of the US trailer for Stoker, from Oldboy director Park Chan-wook, was a wonderfully hateful little speech from Nicole Kidman as the threatened matriarch of the Stoker family. That speech is in this new UK trailer, but thrown toward the end, truncated, and cut up with other footage. The core here, instead, is the nature of her daughter, played by Mia Wasikowska. This trailer turns her character, India, into more of a sinister figure, and an overt threat. The effect is to heighten my already elevated interest in the film, not that it needed much help given the talent involved.

Stoker hits early next year, but you can get a new taste of it below. Read More »

Finally! We recently saw some footage from Stoker, which is the English-language debut from South Korean director Park Chan-wook, best known for the “vengeance trilogy” of Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, and Sympathy for Lady Vengeance.

Stoker appears to be a thriller in the Hitchcock/De Palma vein, with a good dose of heated psycho-sexual tension, and some of Park’s characteristically lush visuals. After the death of the Stoker family patriarch, the women of the family, mother Evelyn (Nicole Kidman) and daughter India (Mia Wasikowska), are visited by Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode). Things get intense, and really weird.

Check out the trailer below. Read More »

It’s not a proper trailer — in fact, this is one of those irritating footage presentations on Entertainment Tonight where the talking heads yammer over the top of scenes from a film. But it is the first footage from Stoker, which marks the English-language directorial debut from acclaimed South Korean filmmaker Park Chan-wook, responsible for Oldboy, Sympathy for Lady Vengeance, and Thirst.

What we see here sets up the story: Nicole Kidman is mom to Mia Wasikowska, and after the death of Mia’s father, her uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) comes to visit, and some sexual power games begin. The Hitchcockian overtones are obvious (“Uncle Charlie” being a carryover from one of Hitchcock’s most praised films, Shadow of a Doubt) but the camerawork and style are all Park, and Kidman looks like she’s giving her best work in a while.  Read More »

We just talked about the Black List script Ezekiel Moss, which has Philip Seymour Hoffman set to direct, and now there’s another Black List script with a high-profile talent attached to direct. Park Chan-wook, who made the original Oldboy and recently finished his English-language debut Stoker, will make Corsica 72. The script is by Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, who are familiar to James Bond fans as the writers behind The World is Not Enough, Die Another Day, Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace, and Skyfall. (At least in part, as many people contribute to Bond scripts.)

Corsica 72 is based on a true story, and uses the classic old storytelling saw of two men who, while close in their youth, take dramatically different paths through life, only to come into conflict later on. Read More »

Briefly: South Korean director Park Chan-wook, perhaps most famous for his ‘revenge’ trilogy of films, the centerpiece of which was Oldboy, has completed his English-language debut and is lining up his next film. The film he just finished is Stoker, starring Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, Dermot Mulroney, and Matthew Goode, and which sounds like a riff on Shadow of a Doubt, as Wasikowska’s character, reeling from the death of her father, meets “her Uncle Charlie, who she never knew existed, and comes to live with her and her unstable mother. She comes to suspect this mysterious, charming man has ulterior motives and becomes increasingly infatuated with him.”

The new film is a western called The Brigands of Rattleborge, scripted by S. Craig Zahler, and which hit the 2006 Black List of popular un-produced screenplays. Variety calls the project “ultra-violent” and notes that it centers on “a group of bandits who use the cover of a torrential thunderstorm to rob the occupants of a small town.” That violence is part of the reason that it hasn’t been made yet, but with Park Chan-wook on board there is a good chance that the violence will be handled well, and that he’ll be able to pull in a top-notch cast to get audiences interested in it.

Briefly: The mere fact that Stoker marks the English-language debut of Oldboy helmer Chan-wook Park would’ve been reason enough to get excited about the film. But toss in the star-studded cast (Nicole Kidman, Mia Wasikowskia, and Matthew Goode) and a Clint Mansell score, and our anticipation levels are going off the charts. Now, helpfully, we finally know exactly when the wait will pay off.

Box Office Mojo (via The Film Stage’s Twitter) has just set a release date of March 1, 2013 for the thriller, which centers around a teenager (Wasikowska) dealing with the sudden death of her father (Mulroney) and the unexpected reappearance of a mysterious uncle (Goode). Jackie Weaver, Lucas Till, and Alden Ehrenreich also star.

Next March is already shaping up to be quite the month for moviegoers — Stoker‘s new date puts it up against Neill Blomkamp’s Elysium, while Oz: The Great and PowerfulCarrie, and Jack the Giant Killer are all set to open later that same month.

When you’ve got the director of Oldboy making an intimate vampire film, you know the score will be as important as the lead actors. In the case of Park Chan-wook‘s English-language debut, Stoker, that certainly seems to be the case. He’s recruited Clint Mansell to score the film, which stars Oscar-winner Nicole Kidman and Alice in Wonderland herselfMia Waskiowska, in the story of a girl and her mother who, after the death of the father, reunite with his mysterious brother, who is rumored to be a vampire. Hence the Bram Stoker-influenced title.

Mansell is best known for his work with Darren Aronofsky on Requiem For A Dream, The Fountain, The Wrestler and Black Swan but he’s provided memorable music for films like Moon and Smokin’ Aces too. Read more after the jump. Read More »

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