Paddington

Another incredibly popular children’s book series is getting the big screen treatment. This time it’s Paddington, which is about a small bear who travels to London and gets taken in by a kind family. Based on the popular series written by Michael Bond, Oscar-winner Colin Firth will provide the voice of the Paddington bear, Oscar-winner Nicole Kidman will play a villainous taxidermist and Hugh Bonneville (Downton Abbey) and Sally Hawkins (Happy Go Lucky) are the mother and father. Also appearing in the film, which will be a mixture of live action and CG, are Harry Potter alums Julie Walters and Jim Broadbent.

David Heyman, producer of Gravity and the Harry Potter films, is producing and Paul King (The Mighty Boosh) is directing. It’ll be released in the UK in November 2014 and in the US early 2015. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Nicole Kidman

Longtime BFFs Nicole Kidman and Naomi Watts have quite a bit in common. Both are fair-complected Australians who’ve gotten attention from Oscar in the past, and who hope to attract still more by playing princesses this fall. (Watts has Diana, Kidman has Grace of Monaco.) Naturally, then, when Werner Herzog needed a replacement for one, he turned to the other.

Kidman has entered talks to take over for Watts on Queen of the Desert, a fact-based epic about the “female Lawrence of Arabia” Gertrude Bell. Watts had been attached to the lead since 2011. Hit the jump for all the details.

Read More »

The Railway Man

Almost three years after he nabbed an Oscar for The King’s Speech, Colin Firth is revisiting World War II from a very different perspective. Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky (Burning Man), The Railway Man tells the true story of veteran Eric Lomax (Firth), who was held as a prisoner by the Japanese during the war.

Decades later, still haunted by that period of his life, Lomax seeks closure by tracking down the army officer (Hiroyuki Sanada) who once tortured him. Nicole Kidman co-stars as Lomax’s wife, and Stellan Skarsgård as his best friend. Jeremy Irvine and Tanroh Ishida play the younger versions of Lomax and his tormentor. Watch the trailer after the jump.

Read More »

Anchorman

Anchorman: The Legend Continues has an extensive lineup of celebrity cameos that ranges from the fairly obvious (John C. Reilly) to the nearly out of left field (Harrison Ford). But it’s not done adding people yet.

A new report indicates that a very high-profile A-lister has agreed to lend her talents to the film. Her role hasn’t been revealed at this time, but let’s hope she has a less strange experience than Ford did with, as he puts it, “What’s-His-Name and the applesauce girl.” After the jump, find out who the latest Anchorman cast member is and read more of Ford’s comments about the shoot.

Read More »

It’s a fool’s errand to try and predict the 2014 Oscars a year in advance, but based on what we know about it so far Grace of Monaco could very well end up a serious contender. It’s directed by La vie en rose helmer Olivier Dahan (check), stars Academy Award winner Nicole Kidman and nominee Tim Roth (double check), and centers around a widely beloved entertainment industry figure (triple check). If that doesn’t sound tailor-made for the Academy, I don’t know what does.

The Weinsteins apparently think so as well, as they’ve already scooped up the distribution rights for around $5 million. Arriving hand-in-hand with that acquisition are the first official images of Kidman as the late actress turned princess. Check them out after the jump.

Read More »

I may not have been wild about Park Chan-Wook‘s English-language debut, Stoker, but there are definite pleasures within. Among them are the performances from the supporting cast. Jacki Weaver shows up for a bit, as does Dermot Mulroney. Neither has featured in a big way in the marketing so far, as each has a relatively small part to play in the film. But this featurette, which offers a behind the scenes look at the greater Stoker family, gives each some time in front of the camera. (Of course there’s plenty from the films star cast, too — Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, and Matthew Goode.) Read More »

To coincide with its long-awaited Sundance debut, Chan-wook Park‘s Stoker has just unveiled a new international trailer. The first English-language outing from the Oldboy auteur stars Mia Wasikowska as India, a teenage girl mourning the death of her father (Dermot Mulroney). The unexpected arrival of her mysterious Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) further complicates matters, especially as he seems to have taken an unhealthy interest in both India and her chilly mother Evelyn (Nicole Kidman). Watch the new video after the jump.

Read More »

The title Stoker suggests vampirism, as a play on the name of Dracula creator Bram Stoker. But the monsters in this film are purely human — people warped into terrible shapes by neglect and jealousy.

For his English-language debut, Oldboy direcotor Park Chan-Wook chose Stoker, a script by actor Wentworth Miller that revolves around a family suffering the pain of change after a significant death. Evie Stoker and her daughter India barely have a moment to come to terms with the untimely passing of husband/father Michael, when his long-lost brother Charlie shows up. Charlie is so long-lost that the rest of the family barely knew of his existence. But it isn’t long before he has insinuated himself into the broken household, and is toying with the affections of lonely Evie and rapidly maturing India.

There’s an influence from Hitchcock – the imposition of a long-lost Uncle Charlie can’t help but conjure thoughts of Shadow of a Doubt — but Stoker doesn’t feel like a Hitchcock film at all. Unfortunately, it doesn’t feel much like a classic Park film, either. There’s lush cinematography to spare, and a strikingly vivid color palette, yes. As a story or character portrait, however, Stoker is resoundingly hollow. Read More »

Click Here To Read Older Movie News
Cool Posts From Around the Web: