Briefly: Yesterday we told you two things: one, that Disney had picked up Neil Gaiman‘s The Graveyard Book and would make development of a feature based on the book a priority. And two, that Henry Selick, who directed The Nightmare Before Christmas and another Neil Gaiman book adaptation, Coraline, has been consulting with Disney and Pixar talent for his latest feature. Turns out those things are more closely related than we thought.

Now Disney has attached Selick to direct The Graveyard Book, which sounds wonderful. I thought very highly of his work on Coraline, which aside from the one character invented for the film, was a really solid effort. Incidentally, Deadline also says that The Graveyard Book will come after the film Selick has been working on for the past year.

Here’s where there’s some confusion. Deadline says that Selick is “already working for Disney-based Pixar on a top secret film.” That contrasts the last info we had, which said that Selick had consulted with Pixar on the feature he’s working on at his own animation studio, Cinderbiter. Regardless, Disney is set to release his next film, and I wouldn’t settle into the idea that he’s making a Pixar movie just yet.

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You’d think that Disney had the screen rights all sewn up for adaptations of Rudyard Kipling‘s story collection The Jungle Book. But in fact the book is public domain. (It was when Walt Disney set the animated film into motion, too.) And there have been a few live-action films over the years, some by Disney, some not. Now we may soon see a new version of the story of the boy Mowgli, raised in the Indian jungle by Baloo the bear and Bagheera, a black panther.

Meanwhile, in an interesting turn of events, today also sees a deal through which Disney will produce and distribute a film based on Neil Gaiman‘s novel The Graveyard Book. That novel was written with the express inspiration of The Jungle Book, though in Gaiman’s text the jungle is replaced with — you got it — a cemetery.

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There’s a certain risk in falling in love with an HBO show. Talk to fans of DeadwoodCarnivale and/or Rome and you’ll hear bitter tales like those spat out by jilted lovers. That won’t be the case with Game of Thrones, say HBO execs, who during a press tour today addressed plans for the show’s future. Along with that talk, there was brief mention of the upcoming adaptation of Neil Gaiman‘s American Gods, which is still in the very early stages. Read More »

Plans made by HBO and Tom Hanks’ Playtone Productions to adapt Neil Gaiman‘s novel American Gods to television are even more elaborate than we expected. In April we learned that cinematographer Robert Richardson had brought the novel to Playtone, which in turn made a deal with HBO. But we didn’t know any details of how the adaptation would go, other than that Neil Gaiman would work on the pilot script with Mr. Richardson.

Now it seems that the companies plan a whopping six seasons based on the one novel. Or ‘inspired by’ might be more accurate, as drawing six seasons out of the novel will likely require writing a good deal of new material. But if Neil Gaiman is involved in that process, that new material could be a gift to his fans. Read More »

HBO May Adapt Neil Gaiman’s ‘American Gods’

HBO is getting behind Game of Thrones in a big way, and the company seems to think that fantasy could be the way to go into the future. So the channel is now negotiating a deal for the rights to Neil Gaiman‘s novel American Gods, and the current plan is for Robert Richardson (yes, the cinematographer) and Neil Gaiman to jointly script the pilot. Read More »

This will either be great news or a disappointing report, depending upon what sort of fan you are of Neil Gaiman‘s landmark comic book series Sandman. Do you want to see the stories adapted into a new medium, or not? Last year we heard that Warner Bros. TV was developing a TV series based on the comic, with Supernatural‘s Erik Kripke a top choice to lead the project.

Yesterday a brief interview surfaced in which Mr. Kripke said that the project was dead. Specifically, he said, “Unfortunately, for a lot of varying reasons, Sandman is not in the works, at least for this season. I retain hope that maybe sometime in the future we can resurrect it.”

Now it sounds as if Sandman was never quite dead. Geoff Johns, writer and Chief Creative Officer for DC Comics says that development continues. Read More »

Last year I got depressed when Warner Bros. Television started developing a television series based on Neil Gaiman‘s standard-setting comic book series Sandman. The property had been in film development hell for many years, and seemed well-suited for it. Over the course of seventy-five issues Sandman told a huge variety of stories with the sort of detail and fearlessness that would likely fail to translate to the screen.

There was some slight consolation in the TV development, as Supernatural creator and showrunner (for five seasons, anyway) Erik Kripke was said to be the top choice to get the show going. He seemed like one of the best possible people to make the show work. But now he says it isn’t happening. Read More »

If one were to make a wishlist of writers to tackle a film adaptation of one of the biggest folktales in world literature, Neil Gaiman might well be at the top. In the comic series Sandman and many novels, the author has demonstrated a great aptitude for adapting, interpreting and embellishing classic tales.

Now he’ll adapt Journey to the West, one of the four great classical Chinese novels, for a massive Chinese 3D film production. James Cameron is along for the ride, too, acting as script and tech advisor. Read More »

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