Ask most people to pick their favorite Pixar movie and one that often gets forgotten is Monsters Inc. Pete Docter’s Oscar winner came out over a decade ago and the characters haven’t resurfaced. So, unlike films such as Toy Story, The Incredibles and Wall-E, it’s simply not as fresh in everyone’s mind. But audiences love Monsters Inc. and that love is about to start bubbling up again. The original film gets a 3D re-release December 19 and you can be sure it’ll include a brand new trailer for 2013′s prequel Monsters University.

Two teaser posters for Pixar’s next film have now been revealed, marking the start of the print campaign. Directed by Dan Scanlon, Monsters University follows Mike and Sulley when they first met in college, studying to become scarers. It features returning stars Billy Crystal, John Goodman, Steve Buscemi and more. Check out the posters below. Read More »

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Disney and Pixar’s choices of venue to showcase the first footage from their June release, Monsters University, was incredibly telling. They chose the University of Southern California on Saturday November 24, which just so happened to be the day of the school’s biggest football game of the year, against the #1 team in the country, the University of Notre Dame. Every inch of the campus was crawling with tailgaters: older fans and alumni, drunk students, a marching band and more. It was an eclectic cross section of what we perceive through the words “the college experience.”

Inside the theater, the footage showcased the Pixar version of that experience. In Monsters University, a prequel to 2001′s Monsters Inc., Mike and Sulley’s long-standing friendship gets off to a rocky start as rivals at the title university. But when they’re forced to team up and join a brand new frat, their new friends are just like those USC fans: some older, some younger, and all pretty crazy.

After the jump, read a bit about brand new Monsters University footage as well as a key scene from Monsters Inc., which gets re-released in 3D on December 19. Read More »

Is it time to look ahead to 2013 already? After the jump:

  • The Hangover 3 will shoot in Orange County, CA
  • Paul Walker is recovering from a Fast Six injury
  • Monsters Inc.‘s Mike is Billy Crystal‘s favorite role
  • Liam Neeson collected $10 million for Taken 2
  • Matt Damon probably won’t play Bourne again
  • Roberto Orci defends the one-second Star Trek clip
  • Over-the-hill movie stars team up in Red 2 set photos
  • See a new photo from Wrong Turn 5: Bloodlines

Read More »

‘Monsters, Inc. 3D’ Trailer and Poster

Most years, we’re lucky if we get one Pixar release. This year, we’re getting three — it’s just that two of them are re-releases of older titles. The only new film, Brave, debuted over the summer, but both Finding Nemo and Monsters, Inc. are getting the post-converted 3D treatment for theatrical release over the next few months.

Now a new trailer and poster have been revealed for the latter, which really tells you nothing new about the movie but might be worth checking out anyway if you enjoy cute things. More after the jump.

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Briefly: For those who can’t wait to see the 3D version of Monsters Inc., there’s now one less month to wait. Disney and Pixar have pulled the 3D re-release forward from January 18, 2013 to Wednesday December 19, 2012. That means there will be only three months between the 3D Finding Nemo re-release and this new Monsters date.

That seems like an ambitious schedule for Disney, but the Monsters re-release will hit at a key moviegoing time, and also prime audiences for the June 21, 2013 release of the prequel, Monsters University. [Deadline]

Ranking the Best & Worst Pixar Movies

How is it that a movie studio that produces kid’s films can be responsible for so many of the best films in cinema?

Twenty years ago, that question would be directed at Disney. Now it’s more likely to refer to Pixar, Studio Ghibli, or even Dreamworks of late. What is it about children’s entertainment that has, time and time again, managed to capture the hearts and minds of adults as much as it has their offspring?

Perhaps it’s a result of these films rekindling our lost sense of childlike wonder and naively adventurous spirit. Perhaps it’s their universally accessible narrative simplicity, always ready to charm away our worries with the awe-inspiring visual splendor through which these tales are so often told.

Whatever the case may be, with thirteen films under their belt, the Pixar formula is one that’s proven itself to leave a lasting impression, transporting us to spectacular, gorgeously rendered and thoughtfully defined worlds — second only to the passionately heartfelt and funny stories of family and friendship embedded within.

What’s more, Pixar is able to achieve this mixture while emboldening children to think for themselves; to challenge the status quo; to recognize their true potential, as well as their limitations. As fun and charming and pretty as Pixar’s films are, it’s the complex ideas and emotions they explore that makes them truly special, affording youths the opportunity to confront the realities of the world around them in a way they can understand and cope with. While everyone else is content to pander to kids, Pixar knows that the best way to communicate with children is to treat them as equals.

But equality is not a trait shared by the current roster of Pixar films. Despite the technical virtuosity on full display with every production, it takes a lot more than stunning animation to make a film great, and that’s not a balance that Pixar always strikes — at least not recently. At one point it may have seemed like the studio could do no wrong, but that was a short-lived romantic notion, and hardly one that merits much deliberation. No, far more instructive would be to scrutinize their missteps in conjunction with their successes, and try to determine what exactly it is that makes any one of their works richer than the other. After all, what better way to understand what makes a story great than to study the best? Read More »

In the Summer of 1994, while deep in production on their first feature film Toy Story, the key Pixar creatives (including John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter and Joe Ranft) had a now famous lunch in a diner called Hidden City Cafe in Point Richmond. During this lunch meeting they ended up brainstorming the ideas that eventually became the films A Bug’s Life, Monsters Inc, Finding Nemo and WALL-E. The story has become mythical, a part of film animation legend and a cornerstone moment in Pixar’s history. It was even featured in the teaser trailer for Andrew Stanton‘s WALL-E.

Sadly, the cafe has closed its doors after over 20 years of service, with unconfirmed reports that it was shut down for rats (Ratatouille anyone?).
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Disney has released the teaser trailer for Pixar’s Monsters Inc prequel Monsters University. The film takes us back to when Mike and Sully were in school learning how to scare. Its Pixar’s version of a college comedy, and the teaser trailer gives us a glimpse at some of the partying and pranks we might expect. The trailer will be presented in 3D, attached to Pixar’s Brave this Friday. But you can watch it now, embedded after the jump. And to complicate things, Disney has released the trailer in four different variations. Please leave your thoughts in the comments below.

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