A new film from indie mainstay Jim Jarmusch is always an event, even if he makes films that are much smaller than “event” really suggests. His new picture, his first in four years, is called Only Lovers Left Alive. It stars Tom Hiddleston, Tilda Swinton, Mia Wasikowska and Anton Yelchin in a genre-influenced story featuring vampires and music.

Hiddleston has described the film as a “love story,” and the bare bones of the plot are that “an underground musician (Hiddleston), deeply depressed by the direction of human activities, reunites with his resilient and enigmatic lover (Swinton).” The trick is that both characters are centuries old.

The press book from Cannes gives us a full synopsis of the film,  but even better also offers a statement from Jarmusch about the film. In addition, we’ve got photos from the press book, along with two clips that surfaced not long ago. Read More »


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I may not have been wild about Park Chan-Wook‘s English-language debut, Stoker, but there are definite pleasures within. Among them are the performances from the supporting cast. Jacki Weaver shows up for a bit, as does Dermot Mulroney. Neither has featured in a big way in the marketing so far, as each has a relatively small part to play in the film. But this featurette, which offers a behind the scenes look at the greater Stoker family, gives each some time in front of the camera. (Of course there’s plenty from the films star cast, too — Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, and Matthew Goode.) Read More »

Briefly: The new film from indie king Jim Jarmusch is a vampire love story (of sorts) and the first image suggests he has taken a page from Tony Scott’s early ’80s effort The Hunger. This movie, called Only Lovers Left Alive, stars Tilda Swinton, Tom Hiddleston, Mia Wasikowska, John Hurt and Anton Yelchin. This first pic, above, shows Swinton and Hiddleston, and the way they’re styled instantly conjured up thoughts of Scott’s film. I don’t expect the two will have much in common in the long run, but the first look is definitely suggestive.

In the film, Hiddleston plays Adam, “an underground musician who’s deeply depressed by the direction of human activities. He reunites with his centuries-long lover, Eve (Swinton), though their idyll is soon interrupted by Eve’s wild and uncontrollable younger sister Ava (Wasikowska).” [Indiewire]

To coincide with its long-awaited Sundance debut, Chan-wook Park‘s Stoker has just unveiled a new international trailer. The first English-language outing from the Oldboy auteur stars Mia Wasikowska as India, a teenage girl mourning the death of her father (Dermot Mulroney). The unexpected arrival of her mysterious Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode) further complicates matters, especially as he seems to have taken an unhealthy interest in both India and her chilly mother Evelyn (Nicole Kidman). Watch the new video after the jump.

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The title Stoker suggests vampirism, as a play on the name of Dracula creator Bram Stoker. But the monsters in this film are purely human — people warped into terrible shapes by neglect and jealousy.

For his English-language debut, Oldboy direcotor Park Chan-Wook chose Stoker, a script by actor Wentworth Miller that revolves around a family suffering the pain of change after a significant death. Evie Stoker and her daughter India barely have a moment to come to terms with the untimely passing of husband/father Michael, when his long-lost brother Charlie shows up. Charlie is so long-lost that the rest of the family barely knew of his existence. But it isn’t long before he has insinuated himself into the broken household, and is toying with the affections of lonely Evie and rapidly maturing India.

There’s an influence from Hitchcock — the imposition of a long-lost Uncle Charlie can’t help but conjure thoughts of Shadow of a Doubt — but Stoker doesn’t feel like a Hitchcock film at all. Unfortunately, it doesn’t feel much like a classic Park film, either. There’s lush cinematography to spare, and a strikingly vivid color palette, yes. As a story or character portrait, however, Stoker is resoundingly hollow. Read More »

Tim Burton’s 2010 3D version of Alice in Wonderland was a unexpected mega hit for Disney, grossing over $1 billion worldwide. Its success is credited with kickstarting the ongoing trend of live action adaptations of fantasy/fairy tale classics such as Mirror Mirror, Snow White and the Huntsman as well as the upcoming Maleficent, Oz the Great and Powerful and more. Surprisingly, after all that, it’s taken two years for Disney to finally get the ball rolling on a follow-up.

Linda Woolverton, a long time Disney writer who not only wrote the first film, but also The Lion King, Beauty and the Beast, Homeward Bound and more, has just been hired to write Alice in Wonderland 2. It’s a sequel to the 2010 film, which itself was a sort-of sequel to the original animated Alice in Wonderland. The story in Burton’s film took place after Alice’s first trip to Wonderland, even though they shared the same title. Read more after the jump. Read More »

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Park Chan-Wook‘s Stoker is one of the film’s we’re most keen to see in the early months of 2013; the English-language debut of the director behind Thirst and the “Vengeance Trilogy” (Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, Sympathy for Lady Vengeance) holds a lot of appeal. That’s in part due to Park’s wonderful work with the camera and actors, as seen in most of his previous films. But there’s also the appeal of him tackling a story with explicit Hitchcock references and a talented cast that includes Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, and Matthew Goode, the three of whom play a strange family unit that comes together in the aftermath of a death in the family.

The first teaser poster for the film artfully brings together some of the story elements, and corrals them in a stark frame of thorny growth that aptly visualizes the characters’ twisted entanglements. Check it out in full below, along with a video showing the poster’s creation. Read More »

The core of the US trailer for Stoker, from Oldboy director Park Chan-wook, was a wonderfully hateful little speech from Nicole Kidman as the threatened matriarch of the Stoker family. That speech is in this new UK trailer, but thrown toward the end, truncated, and cut up with other footage. The core here, instead, is the nature of her daughter, played by Mia Wasikowska. This trailer turns her character, India, into more of a sinister figure, and an overt threat. The effect is to heighten my already elevated interest in the film, not that it needed much help given the talent involved.

Stoker hits early next year, but you can get a new taste of it below. Read More »

Finally! We recently saw some footage from Stoker, which is the English-language debut from South Korean director Park Chan-wook, best known for the “vengeance trilogy” of Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, Oldboy, and Sympathy for Lady Vengeance.

Stoker appears to be a thriller in the Hitchcock/De Palma vein, with a good dose of heated psycho-sexual tension, and some of Park’s characteristically lush visuals. After the death of the Stoker family patriarch, the women of the family, mother Evelyn (Nicole Kidman) and daughter India (Mia Wasikowska), are visited by Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode). Things get intense, and really weird.

Check out the trailer below. Read More »