Wanderlust, from director David Wain (The State, Wet Hot American Summer) and co-writer Ken Marino, outlines and explores a premise that will probably resonate with many people: a young couple, navigating the grind of city life but trapped by their own fears and inadequacies, is forced to leave the city and take refuge with family by dual economic misfortunes.

Well, that part of the premise might resonate. The next bit is perhaps less familiar: the couple’s final destination ends up being Elysium, a commune-like community where their frigid inability to relax is cracked and thawed by an ultra-crunchy lifestyle. (Admittedly, the attentions of a couple of sexually aggressive residents doesn’t hurt.)

For the most part, Wanderlust isn’t a deep character study or a particularly perceptive dissection of human nature. (For something closer to that, see Lukas Moodysson’s Together, which was likely an inspiration for Wain.) This is more like seeing the funhouse mirror caricatures of Wet Hot American Summer grown to adulthood. This film doesn’t quite celebrate the same sense of absurdity, and doing so — living up to one of the film’s own arguments, you could say — might make it more of a keeper. Yet Wanderlust is possessed of a strong  enough free spirit that you might want to join its (almost) free-love drum circle just the same. Read More »

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The great, wacky 2001 comedy Wet Hot American Summer didn’t do any respectable box office business, but the deep goofiness of the film has generated a fervent cult following in the decade since its original release. It doesn’t hurt that the film featured a treasure trove of comic talent, some in the early stages of their careers: Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Michael Showalter, Michael Ian Black, Zak Orth, A.D. Miles, Paul Rudd, Christopher Meloni, Molly Shannon, Ken Marino, Joe Lo Truglio, Amy Poehler, Elizabeth Banks and Bradley Cooper.

The film suggested the possibility of a sequel, and the sequel is a frequent object of inquiry when director David Wain or one of the primary cast members does an interview, even a decade later. In the last couple years, Wain has said that a sequel or prequel isn’t out of the question, despite the fact that Universal doesn’t seem to believe in the project, and several of the original cast members have a much higher quote now than they did a decade ago.

But there may be reason to rejoice, fans of WHAS: Michael Showalter now says that a sequel is “absolutely happening”! Read More »

It’s the first official day of summer, and therefore the longest day of the year, and a withering 95 degrees outside my window. (But it ain’t the heat; it’s the humidity.) So what better time to talk about one of the best summer comedies? David Wain‘s Wet Hot American Summer was made on a relatively small budget and greeted by a seemingly disinterested audience in 2001. But the film has found an enthusiastic cult audience, and one of the tenets of cult movie enthusiasm is holding out hope for a sequel, no matter how unlikely.

In this case, blame the film itself for some of the sequel dreams — it actively advances the idea of a sequel by having the characters end the movie joking about organizing a ten-year reunion. And so, almost every time David Wain gives an interview the question comes up: where’s the sequel? But the movie didn’t do well ten years ago and Universal doesn’t seem to think it will do well now. (Don’t expect a feature-laden anniversary DVD release.)

That doesn’t mean the idea of another movie with the characters (played by Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Michael Showalter, Michael Ian Black, Zak Orth, A.D. Miles, Paul Rudd, Christopher Meloni, Molly Shannon, Ken Marino, Joe Lo Truglio, Amy Poehler, and Bradley Cooper) is 100% out of the realm of possibility, however. It’s probably only about 98% impossible. Read More »

You may think you’ve never heard of Matt Walsh, but odds are, you’ve seen his work before. Walsh is probably best known as one of the founders of the Upright Citizens Brigade, and he’s also appeared in supporting roles in tons of films (Elf, Bad Santa, Role Models, Mystery Team, Cyrus, every comedy Todd Phillips has ever done) and television shows (Childrens Hospital, Outsourced, Party Down, Human Giant, Reno 911!, The Daily Show). In short, while he’s not quite as famous as some of his colleagues, it’s safe to say he has a pretty solid comedy resume. Now Walsh is taking on a slightly different kind of role: director. His first feature is High Road, a stoner comedy featuring a bevy of well-known comedians. Watch the red band trailer after the jump.

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what_is_paul

The website for Paul, the film written by and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost and directed by Adventureland‘s Greg Mottola, has gone live. Whatispaul.com already has a handful of image galleries with on-set photos and a couple of video blogs featuring Pegg, Frost and co-stars Kristin Wiig and Joe Lo Truglio. The Jo Lo Truglio bit is probably the best, as he shows how the production is trying to go green. But Pegg and Frost’s introduction is a nice way to get into their entertaining world. Both are after the jump. Read More »

Joe Lo Truglio SuperBad

Greg Mottola says that a funny actor from his earlier film SuperBad has joined the already awesome cast of his sci-fi buddy comedy Paul, and I’m pretty sure I know who it is.

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The Line is a new online skit-series following the painful trials of two geeks, played by Joe Lo Truglio (The State) and Bill Hader (SNL), as they camp out awaiting the release of a fictional sci-fi blockbuster sequel. These morsels of comedy were practically tailor made for Slashfilm.

In this installment, Paul Scheer from MTV’s Human Giant (and tonight’s /Filmcast!) plays “The Spoiler,” an asshole who preys on sweaty ticket-holders and threatens to blow the movie. No doubt aware of his formidable (and familiar) power over Geekdom, The Spoiler lovingly channels his excess excitement into a Big Gulp from 7-11. We’ll stop there. For more episodes of Crackle.com‘s The Line, we recommend clicking here.

Discuss: Have you ever dealt with a walking Spoiler while waiting in line for a movie?

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