We’re looking forward to Wreck-It Ralph because it boasts an entertaining premise, top-notch comic talents, and fun imagery, but no doubt one of the aspects Disney execs are most excited for is the opportunity to sell a whole lot of branded toys this holiday season. While some recent blockbusters have struggled to find appropriate marketing tie-ins (sorry, but in no timeline do the Men in Black have anything to do with Baskin-Robbins), the merchandising opportunities for the video game-themed Wreck-It Ralph are practically built right in.

Disney unveiled its upcoming line of Wreck-It Ralph toys at their Holiday Gifts Preview event, and in the process introduced some more of the secondary figures who fill out Ralph’s universe. Get a glimpse of the new characters (in toy form) after the jump.

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Last year Disney announced the video game-inspired film Wreck-It Ralph, which is the new incarnation of a project called Reboot Ralph that the studio was toying with for a couple years.

Starring John C. Reilly as the voice of Ralph, the film follows the title character, an 8-bit video game Bad Guy who dreams of being a hero. In order to change peoples’ perception of him, he travels to another video game land to confront the first person shooter character Sergeant Calhoun, voiced by Jane Lynch. But things don’t work out quite as Ralph planned.

The only footage shown for the film so far was unspooled at D23 last year. Now we’ve got a few images that show a bit of what the film has to offer. Check them out below. Read More »

As we head toward the holiday season, Boardwalk Empire winds down, 30 Rock gears up, and Terra Nova remains in purgatory. After the jump:

  • Showrunner Terence Winter explains the explosive Season 2 finale for HBO’s Boardwalk Empire
  • NBC drops an enticing teaser for 30 Rock‘s 6th season
  • HBO reveals a second trailer for its Judd Apatow / Lena Dunham series Girls
  • FX renews The League for a fourth season
  • Fox pushes its decision about Terra Nova‘s fate to next year

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Reboot Ralph has been an unknown quantity on Disney’s slate for the past year. Announced in 2010 as a May 2013 release, the film was bumped up to November 2 2012 earlier this year. But all we really knew was the title, and the fact that it was a reworked version of an old Disney project called Joe Jump, which was about “an outdated video game character who’s been left behind by the march of technology.”

Well, Reboot Ralph has now become Wreck-It Ralph, which is now about “an arcade game Bad Guy determined to prove he can be a Good Guy.” The first cast has been announced, too: John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, Jack McBrayer and Jane Lynch. A few more details are after the break. Read More »

Annette Haywood-Carter, a former script supervisor who jumped to directing (Foxfire, with a young Angelina Jolie, for instance), is preparing to shoot the period drama Savannah in the Georgia town of the same name, and has secured the final pieces of the film’s cast. Jim Caviezel and Chiwetel Ejiofor have joined Bradley Whitford, Jaimie Alexander, Jack McBrayer and Hal Holbrook. Read More »

chuckint-1

In his new book of essays, Eating the Dinosaur, pop culture critic Chuck Klosterman posits that “as a species we have never been less human than we are right now.” Part of the reason why this has happened, he says, is that our growing consumption of media, movies, and entertainment has made it so that “we can’t really differentiate between real and unreal images.” He concludes that we thus, “no longer have freedom to think whatever we want.” For instance, the words, “basketball game,” instantly trigger a mental image of the NBA before (rather than?) a memory of a real experience. The Klosterman twist is that while “reading about Animal Collective on the Internet has replaced being alive,” he’s generally okay with this cultural and social development. I should add that he admits that the Unabomber’s Manifesto and its author had several really good and scarily prescient points.

In his second interview with /Film, many of Eating the Dinosaur‘s ideas are discussed within the context of modern television series like Mad Men and 30 Rock. We also discuss the significance of the odd documentary-style used on The Office and now Modern Family, and why he believes pop-culture writing/blogging on the internet unfortunately has become “an institutional voice” that rivals academia. Is this where I type, “Hopefully the next trailer is better?” For our first interview round with Chuck Klosterman, click here.  For Klosterman’s updates on film adaptations of his books Fargo Rock City and Killing Yourself to Live, click here.

Hunter Stephenson: What’s your biggest problem with 30 Rock?

Chuck Klosterman: [pause] Does it seem like I have one?

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