stephen king it r rating

Two big Stephen King books — big both in reputation, and in page count — have long been in development at Warner Bros. One is The Stand, which after cycling through a few different filmmakers has Josh Boone (The Fault in Our Stars) set to write and direct. The other is It, and we haven’t heard much about that in the past couple years. In 2012 Cary Fukunaga was set to adapt and direct, before he broke into the mainstream with True Detective. Fukunaga seems to be still attached, but now the film is moving from Warner Bros. to the WB holding New Line.

While the label shift may not seem like a big deal, New Line is going to be more explicitly focused on horror moving forward. This raises hopes that we’ll get an R-rated version of It. Read More »

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Director Cary Fukunaga arrives at "Celebrate Sundance Institute" the Sundance Institute's inaugural benefit in Beverly Hills, California

Thanks to his features Sin Nombre and Jane Eyre we’ve been enthusiastic for Cary Joji Fukunaga for years, but now that his show True Detective really owns the public imagination he’s finally getting big recognition from all corners of the entertainment industry.

Fukunaga directed all eight episodes of the HBO limited series, with six having aired so far. With two weeks left in the very odd and unsettling police drama he directed for creator/writer Nic Pizzolatto, and a few feature developments in the fire (including Stephen King’s It) what’s next for the filmmaker? Read More »

SIN NOMBRE

Based on Sin Nombre and Jane Eyre, film fans knew director Cary Fukunaga was a talent. Unfortunately, not everyone saw those movies. That’s not the case with HBO’s True Detective, a show he’s both producing and directing. Huge audiences are watching that show and realizing this guy is one of the best young directors out there today.

As the show continues its run, Fukunaga is blowing up and discussion has started to turn towards his next film. He’s currently shooting a small film called Beasts of No Nation with Idris Elba. To follow that, producer Dan Lin says Fukunaga might finally get around to adapting Stephen King‘s IT. Read More »

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Feast your eyes on posters for Riddick, Planes, and Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters in today’s Sequel Bits. Also after the jump:

  • Brad Pitt thinks a World War Z sequel has potential
  • Jerry Bruckheimer talks Pirates 5 and Top Gun 2
  • Don’t believe those Transformers 4 title rumors, says Michael Bay
  • Jason Statham is “really excited” about Fast & Furious 7
  • Stephen King is too scared to write an It sequel
  • … but you can see the book trailer for The Shining sequel now

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Cary Fukunaga‘s Jane Eyre wasn’t a horror movie per se, but the director brought a distinctive ghostly chill to the classic Gothic romance. And now he’ll be bringing that same knack for dread and suspense to another literary adaptation that more obviously calls for it. Fukunaga has just been hired to direct a remake of Stephen King‘s It, which Warner Bros. plans to split across two films. More details after the jump.

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it

In early 2009, it was announced that Warner Bros was developing a big screen adaptation of Stephen King‘s novel IT. They hired screenwriter Dave Kajganich , who wrote the initial drafts of The Invasion, to pen the screenplay adaptation. We haven’t heard much about the project since. But now we have an update, after the jump.

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stephen King's it

Screenwriter Dave Kajganich tells Dread Central that the big screen remake of Stephen King‘s It will be “set in the mid-1980s and in the present almost equally — mirroring the twenty-odd-year gap King uses in the book”. But more importantly, the film “will not be PG-13. This will be R.” Kajganich explains that the R-Rating “means we can really honor the book and engage with the traumas (both the paranormal ones and those they deal with at home and school) that these character endure.”

Of course, the book is 1,104 pages and Kajganich confirms that Warner Bros wants to adapt the novel for a single film, which means a lot of the source material will have to be cut. The television movie was criticized for being vastly different from the book in order to keep the running time down to 192 minutes. I seriously doubt the theatrical film version will be even close to that long. Two of the other big criticisms of the television movie were that it had been sanitized for public airing (sex/violence) and suffered from budgetary limitations. From the sound of it, the new film will address some of those concerns.

/FilmCast

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In this episode of the /Filmcast, David Chen, Devindra Hardawar and Adam Quigley praise the work of Ron Silver, get excited about Sam Raimi’s return, debate the caliber of American action films in recent years, and wonder exactly why the executives in charge of the SciFi Channel hate their loyal fans. Special guest Brad Brevet joins us from Rope of Silicon.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us next Monday night at Slashfilm’s live page at 9 PM EST / 6 PM PST as we review Tony Gilroy’s Duplicity.

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