‘Goat’ Red-Band Trailer: Guys Gone Wild

Goat red-band trailer

That slight chill in the air means we’re right at the time of year when thousands of teenagers begin descending on college campuses across the country. Some will meet new friends or mentors or discover new passions. A not inconsiderable proportion of the population will join the Greek system. And a few of those kids might find themselves subject to the kind of brutal hazing depicted in Andrew Neel‘s Goat.

Scripted by David Gordon Green and based on the memoir by Brad LandGoat premiered at Sundance earlier this year to promising reviews. Ben Schnetzer (last seen casting spells in Warcraft) stars as Land himself, a 19-year-old college kid who pledges the same fraternity his older brother (Nick Jonas) already belongs to. But the protection and friendship Brad was promised come at a steep cost, as the hazing rituals get more and more intense, with painful results. James Franco also stars, as an alum who can’t quite seem to let go of Phi Sigma Mu. Watch the NSFW Goat red-band trailer below.  Read More »

Goat trailer

It’s no secret that fraternity hazing can be an nasty and demeaning experience. Even films and TV series that show Greek life in an affectionate light feature at least a few scenes of pledges undertaking painful or humiliating tasks. But Andrew Neel‘s Goat, which premiered at Sundance earlier this year, reveals just how ugly it can get.

Based on a memoir by Brad Land, the drama stars Ben Schnetzer as a 19-year-old college student recovering from a brutal assault. He decides to rush a frat that his slightly older brother (Nick Jonas) already belongs to, and soon finds himself surrounded by a toxic stew of violence, aggression, and abuse even more traumatizing than the earlier attack. David Gordon Green helped with the script, James Franco has a cameo as an alum who can’t let go of his frat boy days, because it’s not a real indie drama unless James Franco is rattling around in there somewhere. Watch the first Goat trailer after the jump. Read More »

movies sold at Sundance 2016

These are the movies sold at Sundance 2016. Many of the films that premiere at the Sundance Film Festival are hoping to attract a distributor and find a bigger audience, be it in theaters around the country or distributed through digital VOD. Throughout the festival we will be reporting on all of the movies sold at Sundance 2016. This list should help give you an idea about which movies may someday be available to you either theatrically of VOD. We’re including photo stills from each of the films along with all of the relevant information (director, cast, how much it sold for, the plot synopsis and more).  Hit the jump to find out which movies sold at Sundance 2016.

Latest update: Netflix grabs SVOD rights to Belgica (from Broken Circle Breakdown director Felix van Groeningen) and White Girl (starring Homeland‘s Morgan Saylor); Amazon Prime picks up NUTS!, a documentary about the stranger-than-fiction story of John Romulus Brinkley.

Previous update: Miramax/Roadshow acquire Obama love story Southside With You, Magnet buys horror film The Eyes of My Mother.

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2016 Sundance most anticipated

January doesn’t tend to be a great month for movies if you’re surveying the options at your local multiplex, but it’s one of the best times of the year for film lovers lucky enough to attend the Sundance Film Festival. This year, three of us — Peter Sciretta, Ethan Anderton, and myself — will be on the scene for /Film, taking in some of the best of this year’s independent cinema. Highlights from last year included Me and Earl and the Dying GirlDopeThe End of the TourSlow WestThe Witch, and Cop Car. So what will this year’s slate hold? Join us after the jump for a preview of 30 films we can’t wait to see at the 2016 Sundance film festival.  Read More »

sundance 2016 line-up

Yes, its that time of year again. The Sundance Institute has revealed the 65 feature films which will make up the U.S. & World Cinema Competition as well as the out-of-competition NEXT slate of the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. Hit the jump to see the Sundance 2016 line-up and get excited about next year’s independent films today!

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michael-shannon

In the new rock biopic, The Runaways, a glum Kristen Stewart sits poolside, suckling vodka from a water pistol before pushing it suggestively down the front of her stomach. In a separate scene, she coaches a bathing teenage band mate on how to get wet using a mental image of Farrah Fawcett and a shower head. And then there’s co-star Dakota Fanning, better known as Hollywood’s 15-year-old precocious precious, who hoovers enough blow on an airplane to soar with Kenny Powers. These scenes are presented as the on-tour lifestyle of the titular ‘70s all-girl rock band, assembled and curated by the group’s wiry and rude L.A. producer, a man named Kim Fowley. Foreseeing the popularity of The Runaways for their jail-bait appropriation of the aggression, punk music, and horniness typically associated with adolescent males, Fowley had no qualms with solidifying a legacy by way of the girls’ quicksilver paths to self-destruction.

Actor Michael Shannon plays Fowley with a commitment and intensity welcome and familiar to any viewer who saw his performance in the new Southern indie classic Shotgun Stories or as the best part of Revolutionary Road (which earned him an Oscar nom for Best Supporting Actor). In recent days, Fowley has come out in support of Shannon’s performance, calling him the Christopher Walken of a generation. Given Shannon’s unflattering if amusing portrayal of the guy as an id swimming in midnight oil and the naivety of young girls, the endorsement is mildly surprising. But the comparison is astute. After interviewing the actor this week in a hotel in NYC, I couldn’t shake similar comparisons with the cornhusk steeliness and alertness of a 30something David Letterman and the seen-a-lot-of-shit-ness of Ray Liotta. In our below interview, Shannon discussed the contradictions of Fowley, HBO’s forthcoming Martin Scorsese series Boardwalk Empire, and the time he hid in a doghouse.

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