As you know, we’re big fans of long form interviews at /Film. In the past, we’ve posted extended 30-minute and possibly even one-hour interviews found on shows as Charlie Rose and other corners of the interwebs. Its rare that we see a filmmaker or screenwriter interviewed for anything longer than that. Well, this week The Kevin Pollak Chat Show had a 2 hour and fourty minute interview with Damon Lindelof, co creator and showrunner of Lost, producer for Star Trek, co-writer/producer for Star Trek 2, writer of Jon Favreau‘s Cowboys & Aliens and Ridley Scott‘s Prometheus.

During the interview, Lindelof talks about his twitter “feud” with Game of Thrones author George RR Martin, his inspirations, learning at NYU, his early life trying to make it in Hollywood, Stephen King and King film/TV adaptations, Star Wars vs. Star Trek, the creation of Lost and working with JJ Abrams, collaborating with Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman on Cowboys & Aliens, working with Ridley Scott on Prometheus and how it connects to the Alien films, how the writer’s strike allowed him to produce Star Trek while also working on Lost, brief thoughts on the newly announced 1952 project he’s working on for Disney, his Larry King impression, and much more. Watch the whole interview embedded after the jump.

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‘Game of Thrones’ Renewed For Second Season

Briefly: Good news for George R.R. Martin fans: the ratings have just come in for the debut episode of Game of Thrones on HBO, and the network has already taken the expected step of renewing the show for a second season. The ratings for the first episode weren’t amazing — Boardwalk Empire out-did Thrones in premiere numbers — but they were good enough, at 2.2 million viewers in the initial airing, and 4.2 million across all three premiere showings. But we more or less knew that a second season would happen. The sets, costumes and so forth are so expensive for this debut season that HBO almost needs another season to make money, and is probably looking forward to the eventual DVD box sets that will continue to generate revenue.

The second season will be based upon A Clash of Kings, which is the second novel in the A Song of Ice and Fire series from author George R.R. Martin. [EW]

Good morning — how about starting the day (and the week) with a little epic fantasy? Last night HBO aired a preview of the debut episode of Game of Thrones, which begins the herculean task of adapting the massive A Song of Ice and Fire series of fantasy novels by George R.R. Martin. The full episode will air in two weeks, but for now you can watch the same preview HBO ran. The twelve-minute opening of the show is online, and embedded below. Read More »

‘Game of Thrones’ Full Trailer

If you’re a fan of George R.R. Martin‘s fantasy novel series A Song of Ice and Fire, this is your week. The fifth novel in the series, A Dance With Dragons, was officially announced yesterday, over five years after the publication of the last book. (That was A Feast For Crows, published in October 2005.)

And, more specific to our concerns, there is a new trailer for the HBO adaptation of the first novel in the series, Game of Thrones. This is, the company says, the first official full-length promo, and it has a lot of new footage. It’s probably the best spot yet released for the show, so check it out below. Read More »

‘Game of Thrones’ Premieres April 17

Briefly: Earlier today we saw some trailers and info on the new HBO offerings Mildred Pierce and The Sunset Limited. Now there’s a premiere date for Game of Thrones, the adaptation of George R.R. Martin‘s novels with a pilot directed by Tom McCarthy (The Station Agent, The Visitor). The show will debut Sunday, April 17.

Though I wasn’t knocked out by the trailer for this one I’m still on the hook, not so much because of the source material (which I know is the key factor for a great many fans) but because I’m so curious to see what Tom McCarthy and his cast have done with an adult fantasy setting. David Benioff and Dan Weiss are the lead writers and producers, and the cast includes Sean Bean, Peter Dinklage, Iain Glen, Lena Headey, Richard Madden and Sophie Turner. [EW]

game_of_thrones_1

I’ve had people tell me to read George R.R. Martin‘s fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire for years, but I’ve never been terribly interested. I’m much more taken with the idea of HBO’s television production Game of Thrones, based on the first book in the series, primarily because of the talent involved. (That’s the first still from the pilot, above.) Now with the pilot completed, HBO has greenlit a first season for the show. Read More »

Sean Bean Plays A Game of Thrones

sean_bean_game_thrones

A Song of Ice and Fire, George R.R. Martin‘s fantasy series that begins with the novel A Game of Thrones, is being adapted into a series by HBO, and Sean Bean has just nabbed the lead role, according to THR. (This news was actually reported last week by the George R.R. Martin fansite Winter is Coming and I let it pass as too unsubstantiated. Oh, well.) Bean will play the honorable and upright Lord Eddard ‘Ned’ Stark, Warden of the North, who acts as advisor to King Robert I Baratheon, a role for which Mark Addy is in final talks. Read More »

HBO has given the greenlight to film a pilot based on George R.R. Martin‘s bestselling fantasy novel series A Song of Fire and Ice. The show will be titled A Game of Thrones, named after the first novel in the series. Martin has planned seven books in the series, and the plan is to turn each book into a full season of television.

David Benioff (25th Hour, Troy), who is executive producing the series with D.B. Weiss (I Am Legend Prequel), says that “High fantasy has never been done on TV before and if anybody can do it, it’s HBO. They’ve taken tired genres and reinvented them — mobsters in The Sopranos and Westerns with Deadwood.” While supernatural and sci-fi have boomed in recent years, it does seem extremely odd that the fantasy genre hasn’t been tried in primetime, especially considering the huge box office and critical success of the Lord of the Rings films. The only fantasy television series that comes to mind is Xena: Princess Warrior, and that was syndicated and… uh, bad.

Sure, dragons, magic, and even swords cost money (Thrones has all three), but in the last decade sci-fi television shows have pushed the boundaries in the visual effects department. The producers claim that Thrones is more character centric, and most of the action takes place off screen – a formula that has worked well for Battlestar Galactica.

A Game of Thrones was published in 1996, nominated for 1998 Nebula Award and the 1997 World Fantasy Award, and won the 1997 Locus Award. The official plot description follows:

Long ago, in a time forgotten, a preternatural event threw the seasons out of balance. In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. The cold is returning, and in the frozen wastes to the north of Winterfell, sinister and supernatural forces are massing beyond the kingdom’s protective Wall. At the center of the conflict lie the Starks of Winterfell, a family as harsh and unyielding as the land they were born to. Sweeping from a land of brutal cold to a distant summertime kingdom of epicurean plenty, here is a tale of lords and ladies, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and bastards, who come together in a time of grim omens. Here an enigmatic band of warriors bear swords of no human metal; a tribe of fierce wildlings carry men off into madness; a cruel young dragon prince barters his sister to win back his throne; and a determined woman undertakes the most treacherous of journeys. Amid plots and counterplots, tragedy and betrayal, victory and terror, the fate of the Starks, their allies, and their enemies hangs perilously in the balance, as each endeavors to win that deadliest of conflicts: the game of thrones.

source: Variety

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