Laurent Durieux - The Godfather header

Here’s an offer you can’t refuse. (Sorry, I had to). Popular and talented poster artist Laurent Durieux has tackled one of the most iconic films of all time: Francis Ford Coppola‘s The Godfather. The officially licensed poster will be available for pre-sale on Monday November 17 and, below, you can get all the details on the Laurent Durieux Godfather. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Joshua Budich - Empire

You may have noticed the upcoming issue of Empire Magazine Australia has a pretty unique and awesome cover. It’s an illustration of several popular and influential filmmakers, next to images from their films, all to commemorate a special “Director’s Cut” issue. Filmmakers such as Steven Spielberg, David Fincher, Joss Whedon, Francis Ford Coppola, Sofia Coppola, Michael Mann, David Lynch, John Woo, Danny Boyle, Guillermo del Toro and others contributed content to the issue, so a special cover was made.

The cover is by popular artist Joshua Budich and we talked to him about how it all came about. Below, check out the full image he submitted to Empire and read more about it. Read More »

Francis Ford Coppola

After exploring ghosts, vampires, and man-children over the past couple of decades, Francis Ford Coppola is returning to the topic that cemented his position in the American cinema canon: the Italian-American experience. The Godfather helmer is preparing to direct an as yet untitled film described as both a coming-of-age tale and a multi-decade family saga, the script for which he’ll write himself. More details after the jump.

Read More »

Avatar is one of the best movies of all time. The King of Comedy is one of the best movies of all time. Paths of Glory is one of the best movies of all time. The Red Shoes is one of the best movies of all time. Dazed and Confused is one of the best movies of all time. Each of these surprising, or not-so-surprising statements comes from one of the following filmmakers: Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Francis Ford Coppola and Michael Mann. Each took place in Sight and Sound‘s filmmaker poll of the best films of all time, the results of which were revealed earlier this week.

Over 350 directors in total were polled and Yasujiro Ozu’s Tokyo Story ended up taking the top spot. That doesn’t mean it was everyone’s individual pick; just an average of the votes. In the latest issue of the magazine, which is on sale now, you can read every filmmaker’s full list of choices. Lists from five of the biggest names participants have been posted online. After the jump, read the all time best films ever according to Tarantino, Scorsese, Allen, Coppola and Mann.

Read More »

I like the fact that the band is still called Sonic Youth, even though they’re all in their 50s. Similarly, there’s the term New Hollywood, which represents a very specific time in which the studio bosses gave free reign to independent-minded, radical filmmakers looking to push the artistic boundaries of film. It is a cinema movement that came out guns blazing in 1967 with Bonnie and Clyde and suffered its first wound from Jaws in 1975, then sank into the mud under its own weight by 1977 with Sorcerer. (Yeah, that’s right, Roy Scheider represents the end of New Hollywood from both directions.)

But these movies still feel “new.”

These were films made by a generation influenced by European Art Cinema, reacting against big studio bloat and, in many cases, taking advantage of new technical advances. There are a hundred books you can read about this movement, and the safest bet it to check out Peter Biskin’s “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls” as a primer.

Like most people my age, New Hollywood is a sweet spot – and it was a real chore to limit myself to just eight underrepresented gems. My initial brainstorm had twenty-five titles that all fit the “obscure” and “great” parameters. Maybe I’ll revisit this column with a Volume II if there are calls for it in the comments. (The people have the power!)

Hats off to Twitter’s @MoviesByBowes for the suggestion. Read More »

‘On the Road’ Finally Gets U.S. Distribution

After some thirty-odd years in development, On the Road is finally nearing the end of its long, long journey to the big screen. A week before the film’s scheduled debut at the Cannes Film Festival, IFC Films and Sundance Selects (subsets of AMC Networks) have closed a seven-figure deal for the U.S. distribution rights to the Walter Salles-directed adaptation, which features a strong roster of both rising and established stars.

Among them are leads Sam Riley and Garrett Hedlund, who play Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty (understood to be the fictional alter egos of author Jack Kerouac and his pal Neal Cassady), as well as Kristen Stewart, who plays Dean’s wife Mary Lou. Kirsten Dunst, Amy AdamsTom SturridgeDanny MorganAlice BragaElisabeth Moss, and Viggo Mortensen round out the supporting cast. More details after the jump.

Read More »

This gets filed not under ‘new stuff’ but under ‘whoa, awesome stuff!’

Those who know their Godfather history have heard of the super-notated novel and script copies that Francis Ford Coppola employed to make the film. (The same sort of highly-notated scripts that a great many directors use, of course.) You may have seen images of the detailed pages in a documentary about the film here and there. But here’s a huge scan of one page from Mario Puzo‘s novel, complete with a great many notes by the director. If you’re looking for insight into how someone turns one piece of work into something as enduring as The Godfather, this isn’t a bad place to start. Read More »

Watching this trailer for Francis Ford Coppola‘s new film, Twixt, you might have a difficult time understanding why the film was given a rapturous reception not long ago at Comic Con. This teaser, complete with Tom Waits voiceover, introduces Val Kilmer as a failing writer and Bruce Dern as a weirdo small-town sheriff, as well as the dream-characters V (Elle Fanning) and Edgar Allan Poe (Ben Chaplin). Seen outside of the unpredictable and electric performance atmosphere of the film’s Comic Con panel, Twixt looks like little more than a b-thriller with a bit of unusual ambition. Is that enough? Read More »

Click Here To Read Older Movie News
Cool Posts From Around the Web: