Pixar’s Toy Story 3 has grossed over $895 million worldwide, surpassing Finding Nemo‘s $867.8 million to become the highest grossing film in Pixar history.

Of course, the movie got the bump in 3D price increases that wasn’t available for many of the earlier Pixar films (aside from last year’s Up). It should also be mentioned that Toy Story 3 has only been in theaters for 7 weeks. Pixar films usually remain in some theaters around 30 weeks after the opening weekend. This means there is at least $30 or $40 million more to Toy Story’s domestic tally, and who knows how much worldwide. After the jump I’ve included a chart showing all of the Pixar theatrical releases, along with worldwide box office totals and estimated budget numbers.

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Could this be the ultimate film geek dessert treat? Illinois-based BlueRett Cakes posted this photo of an assortment of Star Wars themed cupcakes. BlueRett has also created some awesome cupcakes based on The Muppets, various Pixar characters and more. Hit th jump to see more.

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BP-Inspired Finding Nemo 2 Posters

Finding Nemo 2

In response to the oil spill disaster, Spanish website The Blog of Chibiboto published a bunch of proposed movie posters for Finding Nemo 2, a co production of Disney/Pixar and BP. The film’s title should probably be called “Saving Nemo”. Check out a couple other poster designs after the jump.

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Chilean-based graphic designer Juan Pablo Bravo put together an awesome infographic showing “100 pixar characters” with their estimated sizes. While it is not perfect (For example, I think Flick from A Bug’s Life is a few times bigger than a normal ant), the graphic gives you a good idea of how most of the Pixar characters measure up.

Bravo created this piece of awesomeness without the help/assistance/encouragement of Pixar, as a personal exercise. It features characters from all of Pixar’s productions — both the short films and the feature films. It even features some of the new toys from the yet-to-be-released Toy Story 3. Check out the full poster after the jump. Click on the image to enlarge.

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Wikipedia has a list of the highest grossing films of this decade so far, and kottke noticed that of the top 20 films at the box office, only one movie was not based on a past film or tv show (remake/sequel), or an adaptation of an established property (be it a comic, book, play, toy…etc).

Which is the only original feature film to make it into the the top 20 grossing films of this decade (so far)? Answer after the jump.

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Yesterday, CBS News aired a segment on an “ongoing blogger debate” over the representation of black people and negative stereotypes in Disney’s The Princess and the Frog. Of course, after previous and longer segments on the failing economy and Air France, even the way in which Katie Couric mentioned “bloggers” carried a decidedly trivial tone connoting birds-on-a-wire. Snob. However, given that hardly anyone has seen a near-complete version of the fourth-quarter film, I have to agree that any “chirped” anger, feigned or genuine, is premature. Also: the world is mad, get over it.

But heated discussions about Disney’s movies, especially in this case, do have precedent: clips from the studio’s infamous 1946 film, Song of the South, are forever available to support and fan the issues of political correctness. Moreover, theories about sociological, hidden and subliminal messages in Disney films and characters are so prevailing that I have enjoyed intriguing classes on the very subject in junior high (for free) and at university (for a repossessed Porsche).

Which brings me to Disney’s Pixar, where animated films are made to awe kids and—and arguably more-so—adults. Feted, beloved, and at times “progressive” as it may be, Pixar is not immune to similarly “bloggy” issues regarding political correctness; a debate over the absence of female lead characters in their films began earlier this year and remains a valid and popular talking point.

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Cool Posts From Around the Web:

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What would Pixar’s WALL-E look like if it was an anime series starring human characters instead of robots? Or what about Finding Nemo set on land instead of the ocean? These two Pixar/Andrew Stanton reimaginings were found on 4chan. The Finding Nemo art (available after the jump) is credited to Andrew Kalko, but I’m not sure who created the Wall-E piece.

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Does Pixar have a gender problem? A blog called Vast Public Indifference thinks so, claiming that the Emmeryville computer animation studio doesn’t have any good women characters as the central protagonists in their stories. Caitlin GD Hopkins claims that most of Pixar’s female characters are “helpers, love interests, and moral compasses to the male characters whose problems, feelings, and desires drive the narratives.” I highly recommend reading Hopkins’ rant as she examines each and every Pixar film, one by one, even taking a look at the studio’s future projects.

Does Pixar have a problem with creating strong female protagonists? I’m a Pixar fanatic and this is a question that has never even occured to me. I would like to think that Hellen/Elasticgirl and Violet were well rounded female characters in Brad Bird’s The Incredibles, and you could argue that WALL-E‘s EVE is both smart and strong. While she is the romantic love interest of the film’s title robot, EVE is a driving force within the story, many levels above Dory from Finding Nemo or Ratatouille‘s only female lead, Colette.

But I do see the point — why does Remy have to be a male rat anyways? Or as someone quickly pointed out in the comments, would that then open the argument up to perpetuating a stereotype by making a female the one who is good at cooking. It might have been more interesting if Linguini was a woman.  Heck, even Colette said that it’s harder for a female to make it in the kitchen.

Discuss: Does Pixar Have a Problem Creating Good Female Characters?

via: Kottke

37-Minute Interview With Andrew Stanton

I just got done watching David Poland‘s 37 minute interview with Finding Nemo and WALL-E director Andrew Stanton, and WOW. If you’re at all interested in the way Pixar makes films, this interview is a much watch. I highly recommend you check it out. You can even put it on and listen to it play in the background as you work. I’m actually surprised that Polland doesn’t also release these interviews as a iTunes podecast.

Stanton spends a lot of time talking about what makes he Pixar creative process different, and how ideas are developed in the Emeryville-based animation studio. He talks about the idea of WALL-E came up, and how Finding Nemo allowed him to make the film and gave him the freedom to take chances like the inclusion of the songs from “Hello, Dolly”. He talks about how the Animation industry became restrained by ridiculous rules and forgot that anything should be possible if it fits/helps the story, and taking advantage of the medium that you’re in. He talks about how Pixar only test screens their films once to the public, but more-so internally. And he talks breifly about working on John Carter of Mars. I’ve embedded the video after the jump, so you have no excuse.
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