The Great Gatsby 1926

Baz Luhrmann will be the latest filmmaker to try to put his stamp on The Great Gatsby when his Jay Z-scored, Leonardo DiCaprio-starring 3D confection hits theaters next month. But he’s far from the first to try and translate the F. Scott Fitzgerald classic to the big screen. Just one year after the original novel was published in 1925, Paramount Pictures and Herbert Brenon put a silent film adaptation in theaters.

Like most other silent pictures of the era, the bulk of the film has long since been lost. (Common estimates say 90% of silent films have been lost.)  Fitzgerald likely wouldn’t have minded much; he and his wife Zelda found it so intolerable they walked out of the movie. But fortunately for curious cinephiles, the trailer, at least, has survived long enough to hit YouTube. Watch it after the jump.

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The Great Gatsby

A week’s worth of new posters have paved the way for The Great Gatsby‘s latest trailer, which shows off quite a bit of new footage. In contrast to the earlier trailers, which played up the heady party atmosphere of the 1920s, this one emphasizes the fiery passions that drive the Baz Luhrmann-directed tale. Specifically, it delves into the mysterious Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio), the tragic embodiment of the American Dream.

To complement the shift in focus, the trailer also samples some different tunes from the soundtrack, including a haunting cover of Amy Winehouse’s “Back to Black” by Beyoncé and André 3000. Check it out after the jump.

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The Great Gatsby

Originally slated for Christmas 2012, Baz Luhrmann‘s The Great Gatsby is now preparing to make a splash as a summer release this May. It’s been fairly quiet on the marketing front for the past few months, but that’s changing with the new release date just around the corner.

A new series of character posters featuring Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio), Daisy (Carey Mulligan), Nick (Tobey Maguire), Tom (Joel Edgerton), Myrtle (Isla Fisher), and Jordan (newcomer Elizabeth Debicki) has just hit the web, giving us a glimpse at the troubled characters who populate this glitzy landscape. In addition, two TV spots show off Lurhmann’s ostentatious style. Check ‘em all out after the jump.

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Ask anyone with even a passing familiarity of contemporary literature what the Great American Novel is, and you’re bound to hear the name The Great Gatsby more a few times. First published in 1924, F. Scott Fitzgerald‘s best loved work captured the zeitgeist of the country in the glittering ’20s, as well as the timeless elation and tragedy of the American Dream.

So it’s not an exaggeration to say that this new cinematic adaptation of the classic tale, from (Australian) director Baz Luhrmann, has a lot to live up to. Happily, Luhrmann’s got a top-shelf cast helping him out. Leonardo DiCaprio stars as the title character Jay Gatsby, the ultimate self-made American man, while Tobey Maguire play writer Nick Carraway, who narrates the proceedings. Rounding out the cast are Carey Mulligan as Gatsby’s long-simmering love interest and Nick’s cousin Daisy Buchanan, Joel Edgerton as her brutish husband Tom, Isla Fisher as his mistress Myrtle, and newcomer Elizabeth Debicki as Daisy’s friend and Nick’s love interest Jordan. Watch the first trailer after the jump.

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Briefly: Baz Luhrmann has added two more to his 3D film version of The Great Gatsby. (Why is this 3D, again?)

His take on the ‘great American novel’ by F. Scott Fitzgerald already features Leonardo DiCaprio as the wealthy Jay Gatsby; Carey Mulligan as Daisy Buchanan, the object of Gatsby’s unrequited love; Tobey Maguire as narrator Nick Carraway; Joel Edgerton as Daisy’s husband, old-money dillweed Tom Buchanan; Isla Fisher as Myrtle, with whom Tom is having an affair; and Jason Clarke as George Wilson, Myrtle’s husband.

Now Gemma Ward, who was recently seen as a mermaid in Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, will play an undisclosed role, and Callan McAuliffe has signed on to play the young Jay Gatsby in a few scenes. Along with young Australian actress Elizabeth Debicki, who also recently signed on to play Nick Carraway’s love interest, Jordan Baker, that makes a nice complement of Australian actors for this Long Island-set story. Not that I’m complaining; I’ve really warmed up to the idea of Edgerton playing Tom Buchanan. The 3D part on the other hand… well, not so much. [EW and Variety]

Despite some vague comments about when, exactly, he’ll make the film, Baz Luhrmann continues to pull together the cast for his new version of The Great Gatsby. And I have to hand it to him: he’s got a hell of a lineup. So far the key roster includes Leonardo DiCaprio as Jay Gatsby, the young wealthy resident of Long Island’s West Egg community, and Tobey Maguire as Nick Carraway, who spends a summer renting a bungalow near Jay’s home, leading to a friendship between the two that forms part of the basis for the story.

Carey Mulligan is on board, Ben Affleck may soon be, and now Isla Fisher is in talks for a significant role, too. She should be perfect for it; more details after the break. Read More »

For months we’ve heard that Moulin Rouge director Baz Luhrman has been workshopping an adaptation the F. Scott Fitzgerald classic The Great Gatsby with Leonardo DiCaprio and Tobey Maguire. Then there was a hotly contested casting search for the role of Daisy, with the role eventually going to Carey Mulligan. Finally, Luhrman mentioned he might shoot the film in 3D.

Now Luhrman, who has only directed four films since 1992, isn’t even sure he’s going to make the film. A final decision will be made by the end of the week. Read his quotes after the break. Read More »

Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby

According to Nikki Finke, Moulin Rouge and Romeo and Juliet director Baz Luhrmann (we’ll pretend Australia never happened) has signed on to helm a big screen adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald‘s The Great Gatsby.

I’m embarrassed to admit that I’ve never read F. Scott’s 1922 novel or seen any of the many movie adaptations (one of which starred Robert Redford and Mia Farrow with a script by Francis Ford Coppola and another starring… Paul Rudd?), so I’ll refrain from even pretending to know a little about what I’m talking about with this one. You can read the entire book on Google’s Book Search. The official description from the Scriber Classics paperback follows:

“The exemplary novel of the Jazz Age, F. Scott Fitzgeralds’ third book, The Great Gatsby (1925), stands as the supreme achievement of his career. T. S. Eliot read it three times and saw it as the “first step” American fiction had taken since Henry James; H. L. Mencken praised “the charm and beauty of the writing,” as well as Fitzgerald’s sharp social sense; and Thomas Wolfe hailed it as Fitzgerald’s “best work” thus far. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when, The New York Times remarked, “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s that resonates with the power of myth. A novel of lyrical beauty yet brutal realism, of magic, romance, and mysticism, The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.”

The Great Gatsby never looked like a fun read, which probably explains why I never checked it out (am I wrong?). Then again, I hate period dramas, especially of the romance variety. I’d love to see Luhrmann compliment his visionary style with a fun story again.

Discuss: Is Baz Luhrmann a good fit for The Great Gatsby?

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