“Everyone steals from everyone, that’s movies.” The guys in Swingers knew it and we all know it too. Everyone who has ever made a movie has been influenced by someone before them; even the people who invented the art form had influences from outside film. Of course many people innovate, only to to have their techniques ripped off later, but it’s almost impossible to find something that is 100% original in every aspect. That’s more or less the thesis of the video series Everything is a Remix, produced by Kirby Ferguson. He produces videos (some of which we’ve highlighted on the site) that visually show how some of our favorite movies borrow from movies before them.

Ferguson is still working on the fourth installment of the series, but in the meantime he has released a video dedicated to the 1999 hit film The Matrix by The Wachowski Brothers. Part of the reason we all love The Matrix is that it takes a cool, innovative (but not wholly original) concept and infuses it with a plethora of familiar and awesome cinematic references. After the jump, you can see a full video breakdown of all of those references. Read More »

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VOTD: ‘Everything Is a Remix’

Thanks to DVD, compression software and services like YouTube and Vimeo, technology has changed the way we ingest visual content. But it hasn’t done as much as I’d like to the way we understand it.

Take the Everything is a Remix project, by editor Kirby Ferguson. The second installment was released this week, and it is a slick, well-written and edited piece of work that points out how much of the entertainment we consume is related to other entertainment. Specifically, it breaks down parts of Star Wars and Kill Bill into component elements, presenting scenes from those films alongside the original images re-purposed by George Lucas and Quentin Tarantino. But I’m left wanting more.

Watch both this film-centric second installment and a sidebar dissection of Kill Bill after the break, then hit the comments for a discussion of how the mechanism of influence from one film to another really affects storytelling. Read More »

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