A slew of new clips were released over the weekend, offering better looks at possible future summer blockbusters Green Lantern, Transformers: Dark of the Moon, and 30 Minutes or Less. Whether you want to see the gorgeous world of Oa, an evil alien robot copy machine, or Aziz Ansari molding the future leaders of tomorrow, we’ve got something for you. (If you want none of those things, though, you’re out of luck.) See the clips after the jump.

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Would you want to see a Superman movie where he can’t wear his iconic costume? It could happen. Variety printed a fascinating article Friday about how the legal rights behind the Man of Steel could result in the biggest severing of the character since he met Doomsday. This doesn’t affect the current film; that Zack Snyder movie will be moving along as planned. But if it doesn’t succeed, another origin story could be impossible. Basically, come 2013, the rights to key elements of Superman break into two where the heirs of the character’s original creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, retain elements such as his costume – red cape and boots, blue leotard – plus his ability to “leap tall buildings in a single bound” while DC Comics will keep the rights to most of the villains and the ability to fly.

How is that even possible and what does it mean for the future of the franchise? We try and make sense of the legal jargon after the break. Read More »

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Most of DC Entertainment, the newly reorganized company that is comprised of a large multimedia division and the DC Comics publishing enterprise, is being moved from New York to Burbank, in the Los Angeles area. There’s a lot of musing about what this really means for the future of DC Comics and the related properties lodged at Warner Bros. Read More »

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Given the fact that Marvel and DC Comics characters have proved to be the new mainstays for summer moviegoing, I’m surprised that we haven’t seen a new documentary that reaches deep into the history of either company. That might be about to change as Jeffrey Blitz and Sean Welch (who directed and produced Spellbound, Rocket Science and Lucky) are producing a doc about DC. Mac Carter, who worked on Spellbound, is directing the film, which we may see at Comic Con.  Read More »

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When Warner Bros. and DC began a restructuring process earlier this year, we knew that changes were afoot with both the motion picture and (to a lesser extent) printed versions of the DC Universe. Now DC has unveiled a line of graphic novels called Earth One, which will aim to totally reboot the DC Universe for newer readers. The first chapters will feature Batman and Superman, with Geoff Johns writing the former and J. Michael Straczynski penning the latter.

Will these books feature versions of the characters that are likely to end up on movie screens? Read More »

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UPDATE: WB has officially announced the change in a press release, which opens with this: “Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. (WBEI) has created DC Entertainment Inc., a new company founded to fully realize the power and value of the DC Comics brand and characters across all media and platforms, to be run by Diane Nelson, it was announced today by Barry Meyer, Chairman & CEO, and Alan Horn, President & COO, Warner Bros.” The other notable point is that DC Comics publisher Paul Levitz will “segue from that role to return to his roots as a writer for DC and become a contributing editor and overall consultant to DCE.” Read the entire press release at the end of the original article, which follows.

Big news on the DC Comics front this morning, as word comes in that Warner Bros Pictures Group president Jeff Robinov, whose contract was just renewed, is finally putting through a plan he’s quietly developed over the past couple of years: DC Comics will now report directly to him and Diane Nelson, the woman who shepherded WB’s take on Harry Potter since 2000. (Nelson is also president of Warner Premiere, the direct to DVD label that has released stuff like Green Lantern: First Flight.) What does this mean for all of DC’s possible hero movies at WB? Read on. Read More »

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