Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later Trailer

Netflix brought back Wet Hot American Summer for a series revival back in 2015 after development of a sequel to the 2001 Sundance comedy hit was happening for years. Instead of making good upon the promise of a 10-year reunion teased at the end of the movie, the series went back to the first day at Camp Firewood, which was all the more ridiculous simply because it had a cast of actors and actress in their 30s and 40s playing teenagers. But now the reunion we’ve all been waiting for is finally coming.

Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later is a new eight episode continuation of the goofy camp comedy that brings back (almost) all of the original cast members again as we flash forward to their lives in 1991. It looks just as insane as the prequel series was, and it even has some new cast members joining the fun.

Watch the Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later trailer after the jump. Read More »

The great, wacky 2001 comedy Wet Hot American Summer didn’t do any respectable box office business, but the deep goofiness of the film has generated a fervent cult following in the decade since its original release. It doesn’t hurt that the film featured a treasure trove of comic talent, some in the early stages of their careers: Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Michael Showalter, Michael Ian Black, Zak Orth, A.D. Miles, Paul Rudd, Christopher Meloni, Molly Shannon, Ken Marino, Joe Lo Truglio, Amy Poehler, Elizabeth Banks and Bradley Cooper.

The film suggested the possibility of a sequel, and the sequel is a frequent object of inquiry when director David Wain or one of the primary cast members does an interview, even a decade later. In the last couple years, Wain has said that a sequel or prequel isn’t out of the question, despite the fact that Universal doesn’t seem to believe in the project, and several of the original cast members have a much higher quote now than they did a decade ago.

But there may be reason to rejoice, fans of WHAS: Michael Showalter now says that a sequel is “absolutely happening”! Read More »

It’s the first official day of summer, and therefore the longest day of the year, and a withering 95 degrees outside my window. (But it ain’t the heat; it’s the humidity.) So what better time to talk about one of the best summer comedies? David Wain‘s Wet Hot American Summer was made on a relatively small budget and greeted by a seemingly disinterested audience in 2001. But the film has found an enthusiastic cult audience, and one of the tenets of cult movie enthusiasm is holding out hope for a sequel, no matter how unlikely.

In this case, blame the film itself for some of the sequel dreams — it actively advances the idea of a sequel by having the characters end the movie joking about organizing a ten-year reunion. And so, almost every time David Wain gives an interview the question comes up: where’s the sequel? But the movie didn’t do well ten years ago and Universal doesn’t seem to think it will do well now. (Don’t expect a feature-laden anniversary DVD release.)

That doesn’t mean the idea of another movie with the characters (played by Janeane Garofalo, David Hyde Pierce, Michael Showalter, Michael Ian Black, Zak Orth, A.D. Miles, Paul Rudd, Christopher Meloni, Molly Shannon, Ken Marino, Joe Lo Truglio, Amy Poehler, and Bradley Cooper) is 100% out of the realm of possibility, however. It’s probably only about 98% impossible. Read More »

Did you see The Ref and think that it really needed a little more American Psycho? Then The Perfect Host might be for you. It tells the story of bad guy robber Nathaniel Parker, who tries to take refuge in the home of David Hyde Pierce after a crime goes bad. But it turns out that Mr. Pierce is a lot less normal than he looks, and things get a little crazy. There is a trailer that hints at just how crazy the movie gets — and in some cases how wacky, like Beetlejuice calypso dance scene wacky. Check it out after the break. Read More »

perfecthost

I loved the premise of The Perfect Host: a bank robber (Clayne Crawford) talks his way into the house of a well-to-do man named Warwick (David Hyde Pierce) by pretending to be the friend of a friend, only to find that Warwick is far more dangerous than he seems. So how was the film’s execution? After the jump, read some of my thoughts on the film and watch a brief video interview I did with the director and stars of the film.
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