Watchmen HBO miniseries

In 2015, talk of a Watchmen miniseries involving director Zack Snyder began. The news was quiet about the second adaptation of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons‘ graphic novel, but in June it was reported Damon Lindelof was in talks to develop Watchmen as its showrunner. The Leftovers co-creator has yet to have any meetings with HBO about Watchmen, but he’s been thinking a lot about Moore’s 12-issue story recently.

Below, read Lindelof’s thoughts on the Watchmen HBO miniseries and a Lost revival.

Read More »

Dave Gibbons Discusses the Watchmen Miniseries

When it comes to HBO’s potential adaptation of Watchmen, artist Dave Gibbons “[knows] as much as the next person.” Gibbons was involved with director Zack Snyder‘s 2009 adaptation, making appearances and promoting the movie and he remains pleased with it. Gibbons fully supported the film, and it sounds like he’d do the same for the miniseries. The project is in very early stages, so the artist doesn’t know what the future holds, but he always thought Alan Moore‘s 12-issue story would work better as a show than a movie.

Below, read what Gibbons had to say about the Watchmen miniseries.

Read More »

San Diego Comic Con

As we prepare for another year at San Diego Comic Con International, I wanted to take a look back at the best moments in Comic Con history. What are the coolest and most eventful things to happen over the last decade while sitting in Hall H? What makes a great Comic Con moment? Lets take a look back at the best comic-con moments of all time.

Read More »

Damon Lindelof interview

Until the end, The Leftovers delivered the unexpected. Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta‘s HBO series grew into a show that defied or subverted all expectations. After the first season, which now feels like a complete contrast to the series finale, it felt like all bets were off.

Kevin Garvey Jr. (Justin Theroux) as a messiah? Matt Jamison’s (Christopher Eccleston) spiritual journey on a sex cruise? And then there’s Nora Durst’s (Carrie Coon) experiences in season 3. The Leftovers seemed like it could go anywhere it wanted and earn it. After an ambitious season 2, Lindelof and Perrotta took more chances with the final eight episodes. Big swings that led to one emotionally satisfying finale. It was a show so good that the Emmys almost completely ignored it.

In the first of an expansive, two-part interview, Lindelof talked to us about some of the choices made in the final season of The Leftovers.

Read More »

Watchmen

Who watches the watchmen? Looks like the answer might be Damon Lindelof. The co-creator of shows like Lost and The Leftovers is reportedly staying in the HBO fold and is currently in talks to develop a TV adaptation of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ groundbreaking superhero comic book series for the premium cable channel.
Read More »

the leftovers finale

At the end of The Leftovers, almost all the questions and answers don’t matter. They never really did. In the final minutes, all that matters are the two people sitting across from each other. As far out as Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta‘s HBO series got, it became increasingly more intimate over the course of three seasons. A clean and simple answer isn’t closure in The Leftovers finale; it’s a beautiful scene between siblings playing Matt Libs.

Below, check out our thoughts on The Leftovers finale.

Read More »

in defense of the lost ending

(Welcome to The Unpopular Opinion, a series where a writer goes to the defense of a much-maligned film or TV show, or sets their sights on something seemingly beloved by all. In this edition: a defense of the final season of the ABC TV series LOST.)

LOST was once at the pinnacle of the early Golden Age of TV. Ambitious, awe-inspiring, and frustrating, it brought forth a new age in serialized primetime television and was perhaps the last great TV show to command the attention of audiences across the country before streaming and prestige cable shows dispersed them.

You remember those glory days, right? The connective flashbacks, the masterful character work, the scavenger hunt for hints, the jaw-dropping cliffhangers. It was like nothing on TV. And it ended seven years ago today, airing its series finale on May 23, 2010.

So it pains me that LOST, one of the most exciting and daring sci-fi TV series — and one of my favorite shows of all time — is met with derision because of its final season. To be sure, it’s an oddly opaque finale for a show that until then, had operated in grays — espousing realist and borderline nihilistic philosophies that called into question the nature and morals of man. But one of the charms of LOST was that it never tried to answer these questions. Yes, it bludgeoned you over the head with that “man of science, man of faith” debate between Jack Shephard (Matthew Fox) and John Locke (Terry O’Quinn), but neither were able to ever really win the upper hand.

The finale changed that. The answer, it seemed to say, was faith. And in a show that depended so heavily on sci-fi tropes and staples, this switcheroo understandably angered people.

Read More »

Damon Lindelof interview

(This is part two of a larger interview. You can read part one right over here.)

The Leftovers isn’t playing it safe in its third and final season. Co-creators Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta‘s series has grown more ambitious over its three chapters and this season can get pretty bonkers, to say the least.

As out there as The Leftovers can get, it somehow manages to stay grounded. The surreal touches and bizarre turns tend to carry an emotional weight, striking deep into the heart of the characters. Last season’s “International Assassin” is a great example of that.

Lindelof takes some big swings with season 3. He recently told us about some of the risks the writers took, how the music has evolved over the series, and what he’s learned from the experience of The Leftovers.

Read More »

Damon Lindelof interview

(This is the first half of a two-part interview. The second half will run later this week.)

The Leftovers entered its third and final season this week. The first hour was what we’ve come to expect from showrunner Damon Lindelof‘s ambitious HBO drama – the start of another ominous, darkly funny, and emotional journey for the struggling family at the heart of the Tom Perrotta adaptation. Kevin Garvey Jr. (Justin Theroux) and co. remain at the forefront of this story, not the mystery (as intriguing as it is).

There are a few questions raised at the start of season 3, but the characters continue to drive Damon Lindelof and Perrotta’s story. The new season is set three years after the events of season two, and some of them have changed and grown, but others still find themselves lost in this fish-out-of-water chapter of The Leftovers.

I was recently able to speak with Lindelof about the series and while we didn’t get into too many plot specifics, we did talk about the structure of season 3, shows that inspire the series (like Rick and Morty), and the side effects of binge-watching.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Damon Lindelof directing

Over the years, some notable television showrunners have taken to directing. Ryan Murphy, Noah Hawley, and Matthew Weiner have directed episodes of their shows, just to name a few examples. Sometimes these transitions from writing to directing yield great results. Hawley recently directed the thrilling and imaginative Legion pilot, while back in 2012 David Chase (The Sopranos) gifted us with his feature directorial debut, Not Fade Away.

Damon Lindelof is one well-known showrunner who’s yet to direct. In all of his years on Lost and The Leftovers, which begin its third and final season April 16, he didn’t get behind the camera once. We recently asked him why.

Read More »