‘Let the Bullets Fly’ Trailer

Over a year ago Peter highlighted the Chinese action film Let the Bullets Fly as one of the better movies of 2010, and the film is finally edging towards a domestic release.

Jiang Wen‘s film features the director as a bandit who poses as the mayor of a town in order to bleed the place dry, but he runs afoul of the local crime boss, played by Chow Yun-fat. An early teaser for the movie made it look somewhat appealing, but the new domestic teaser really emphasizes the film’s crazy action. Check it out below. Read More »

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Fantastic Fest is filled with so many consecutive movies that writing timely, full reviews of each without losing a considerable amount of sleep or sanity would be difficult. There are writers out there who will do it and I salute them. But for me, being the lone wolf for /Film in 2011, I’ve decided to provide mini-reviews of most things, with the occasional video blog, full review and interview thrown in. This way you hear about everything. So here’s a pair of mini-reviews: A Boy And His Samurai directed by Yoshihiro Nakamura and Let the Bullets Fly by Wen Jiang.

A Boy And His Samurai combines time travel, samurais and baking reality shows into a perfect little package that will have you smiling ear to ear. Let the Bullets Fly stars Chow Yun Fat as a local crime boss who engages in a battle of wits and bullets with a notorious con-man. It’s a tad confusing but constantly entertaining. Read more about each after the jump. Read More »

Movie Trailer: Shanghai

Shanghai

You’d think an epic WWII espionage thriller set in Shanghai, starring John Cusack and directed by Mikael1408Håfström would be an easy sell. But maybe not, if it’s really just a trip to dullsville. Shanghai was pushed around on the Weinstein Company schedule for a while last year before being pushed off indefinitely. We’ve seen stills for the film, but now there’s an international trailer. If this clips is anything to judge the film by, no wonder TWC didn’t want to spend money to advertise and release it. Read More »

confucius1

We covered the first three-minute long trailer for the Chow Yun Fat-starring Confucius back in September, and now we have yet another glimpse at the historical epic. There have been several small trailers released since then, so I’m just going to go ahead and call this trailer number two. This trailer has the benefit of being in HD, and gives us a much better look at the scope of the film, as well as the many large-scale battles. Confucius was directed by Mei Hu, with a budget around $20 million. It was developed in part with the Chinese government, and is part of an initiative to promote the philosophy of Confucius.

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Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: I celebrate all levels of trailers and hopefully this column will satisfactorily give you a baseline of what beta wave I’m operating on, because what better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising? Some of the best authors will tell you that writing a short story is a lot harder than writing a long one, that you have to weigh every sentence. What better medium to see how this theory plays itself out beyond that than with movie trailers?
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davis_butler_chow

Here’s a batch of casting news to tide you over until the next Page 2. Viola Davis, always a great actress and whose appearance in Doubt nearly owns the entire film, has taken two roles. One is in It’s Kind of a Funny Story, where she’ll work with…Zach Galifianakis? The film is about a depressed teen who checks himself into an adult psych ward. Davis will be his psychiatrist. If Galifianakis was playing the teen I’d be amazed, but that’s not likely to be the case.

The other film for Davis is Trust, which is not a remake of the great Hal Hartley film with the late Adrienne Shelley and Martin Donovan. Instead, this is David Schwimmer‘s next directorial effort, in which a teen girl is ‘victimized by an adult who gained her trust posing as a teenager on a chat room.” Clive Owen and Catherine Keener are already in the cast; Davis will play a counselor. Watch out for that typecasting, Viola! [Variety] Read More »

confucius1

The trailer for Chow Yun Fat’s next project, Confucius, recently hit the internet, and it’s gathered quite a bit of attention. The trailer forgoes dialog completely, and instead we’re treated to three minutes of gorgeously shot epic scenes, all set to a somber soundtrack. The film is directed by Mei Hu, a director I’m not at all familiar with, but apparently she’s trusted enough to handle a ~$20 million epic. The film was developed in part with the Chinese government, and is part of an initiative to promote the philosophy of Confucius.

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stranglehold

John Woo‘s production company Lion Rock Entertainment is developing a big screen sequel to the classic 1992 Hong Kong action film Hard Boiled. Screenwriters Jeremy Passmore (Special) and Andre Fabrizio (upcoming John Carpenter film The Prince) are penning the adaption of the Woo-produced 2007 video game Strangehold, which was an official sequel to Hard Boiled and featured star Chow Yun-Fat reprising his role as hard-boiled cop Inspector “Tequila” Yuen. I assume the film  being developed for American audiences, as American screenwriters are attached. Which makes me wonder if this would be a real sequel to Hard Boiled, or a stand-alone film which could function as a sequel to Hard Boiled in an alternative universe where the first film took place in the United States (and some people thought Watchmen was confusing?).

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