Never Here poster

So much has happened in the news recently that it seems almost impossible that the Los Angeles Film Festival happened less than four months ago. But as the entertainment industry continues its push through the traditional festival season, we wanted to shine a little light on a smaller film from the LAFF that’s getting a release this month and is worthy of your attention.

The movie is Never Here, a psychological drama from Vertical Entertainment that’s stuck with me ever since I saw it back in June. It marks the narrative directorial debut of filmmaker Camille Thoman and stars Mireille Enos (The Killing, World War Z) and the late Sam Shepard (The Right Stuff, Black Hawk Down). Below, you’ll find the exclusive first look at the Never Here poster – which happens to feature a quote from our festival review.
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Green Band Trailer

Trailers are an under-appreciated art form insofar that many times they’re seen as vehicles for showing footage, explaining films away, or showing their hand about what moviegoers can expect. Foreign, domestic, independent, big budget: What better way to hone your skills as a thoughtful moviegoer than by deconstructing these little pieces of advertising?

This week we get back to old fashioned thrillers, visit some chimpanzees for funsies, we give it up to George Michael, discover the lighter musical side to a zombie apocalypse, and watch a doc on a little band that could. Read More »

Never Here review

Miranda (Mireille Enos) is an installation artist interested in exploring the concept of identity. One of her exhibits is based on the time she found a man’s phone, went through it to learn the places he normally visited, and then trekked to those places to surreptitiously take photos of him, which she put on display in a gallery. But when she poses as the key witness in a police investigation of a random assault that occurred just outside her apartment window, Miranda is struck with inspiration for her latest idea, a twisted, voyeuristic documentation of the man she believes committed the crime.

It’s fitting that Miranda’s last name is “Fall,” since the character slowly descends into her own delusional interpretation of the world over the course of Camille Thoman’s unsettling directorial debut, Never Here. Read More »