Crimson Peak

Guillermo del Toro‘s Crimson Peak is a deliciously dark and twisted piece, set in the most gorgeous, most decrepit haunted house you’ve ever seen and anchored by three mesmerizing performances from Tom Hiddleston, Mia Wasikowska, and most especially Jessica Chastain. It’s also not the horror movie that’s being sold in the trailers, but a Gothic romance. Think Jane Eyre plus ghosts, not The Conjuring plus corsets.

That’s not such a bad thing if you happen to love costume dramas, but it can be an unpleasant surprise if you don’t. And that misleading marketing doesn’t seem to be doing it many favors. I’ve seen a lot of critics ding it for being ineffective as a horror movie — which of course it is, because it isn’t really one. The B- Cinemascore and limp box office might also reflect the discrepancy between what Crimson Peak seems to be, and what it actually is.

Admittedly, it’s not difficult to understand why Universal chose to market Crimson Peak as a horror movie. A Brontë-esque romance is a much harder sell outside the arthouse than a spooky, seasonally appropriate haunted house flick. And it’s hardly the first time a marketing team has chosen to sell a completely different movie. Sometimes it’s part of a savvy strategy and sometimes it’s a desperate ploy; sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn’t. Below, let’s look back at 15 movies with misleading trailers. Warning: Some spoilers ahead.  Read More »