I like the fact that the band is still called Sonic Youth, even though they’re all in their 50s. Similarly, there’s the term New Hollywood, which represents a very specific time in which the studio bosses gave free reign to independent-minded, radical filmmakers looking to push the artistic boundaries of film. It is a cinema movement that came out guns blazing in 1967 with Bonnie and Clyde and suffered its first wound from Jaws in 1975, then sank into the mud under its own weight by 1977 with Sorcerer. (Yeah, that’s right, Roy Scheider represents the end of New Hollywood from both directions.)

But these movies still feel “new.”

These were films made by a generation influenced by European Art Cinema, reacting against big studio bloat and, in many cases, taking advantage of new technical advances. There are a hundred books you can read about this movement, and the safest bet it to check out Peter Biskin’s “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls” as a primer.

Like most people my age, New Hollywood is a sweet spot – and it was a real chore to limit myself to just eight underrepresented gems. My initial brainstorm had twenty-five titles that all fit the “obscure” and “great” parameters. Maybe I’ll revisit this column with a Volume II if there are calls for it in the comments. (The people have the power!)

Hats off to Twitter’s @MoviesByBowes for the suggestion. Read More »

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We have quite a mixed bag of new images for you today, covering everything from supernatural teen romance to comic book adaptation. After the jump, get a look at the sci-fi not-quite-remake Dredd, the YA adaptation Beautiful Creatures, Tom Hooper‘s star-studded Les Misérables, Louis Leterrier‘s magician heist flick Now You See Me, and Brian De Palma‘s steamy thriller Passion.

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Briefly: Brian De Palma is nearly set to roll on Passion, his remake of Alain Corneau’s thriller Love Crime, with Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace in the lead roles. The film watches as a young businesswoman turns murderess when her boss and mentor steals one of her ideas.

Now Dominic Cooper (The Escapist, An Education, The Devil’s Double) and Karoline Herfurth (The Reader) are signing on to the film as well.  We don’t have any info on what parts they’ll play, though Herfurth may be a character named Dani, perhaps a gender-altered version of the character played by Guillaume Marquet in the original.

De Palma is known for a heightened visual style, and I’m now more excited to see footage from Passion because it is being shot by veteran cinematographer José Luis Alcaine, who may be best known for his extensive collaboration with Pedro Almodovar. (On Volver, The Skin I Live In, Bad Education, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown and more.) That’s a great pairing. [MediaBiz via De Palma A La Mod and The Playlist]

Brian De Palma has been actively looking for new film projects, and it looks like he will shoot the film Passion in the next few months. But he’s also setting up something to do later this year: if things work out, a deal in the works at the Berlin Film Festival will see the director behind the camera for a remake of the 1986 Burt Reynolds thriller Heat. (Released in the US in ’87, so you’ll often see it listed as an ’87 movie.)

Jason Statham will be in the Reynolds role. More detail follows, including the reason I’m fairly interested in this remake. Read More »

It’s a good time to get a little bit of Brian De Palma news out there. With Mission: Impossible talk flying left and right, some people are giving De Palma’s ’96 franchise kickstart another look and realizing “hey, this ain’t half bad.” Granted, of the five movies he’s made since that film, only one (Femme Fatale) stands as a picture I want to go back to, but I’m hopeful for the future.

For the past year, De Palma has been developing two films. One is The Key Man, which we thought might end up being his next. But now it looks like his next film will be the other in-development project, called Passion, which now has Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace lined up to star when the film rolls in Berlin in March. Read More »

Brian De Palma to Direct Thriller ‘The Key Man’

The last decade hasn’t been the most popular one for Brian De Palma, at least in a commerical sense. I do love his 2003 movie Femme Fatale a whole hell of a lot, but can’t really get behind the James Ellroy adaptation The Black Dahlia, and feel like the minor Iraq War film Redacted might be worth a second look at some point in the future, if only because it was a relatively early effort to embrace the always-on nature of modern video.

But now it’s a whole new decade, and the director has been working to line up a couple of possible projects. We’ve heard he might remake Alain Corneau’s Crime d’amour (Love Crime) as a film called Passion, for example. Now it seems as if he has money lined up for another project, a thriller called The Key Man, which will shoot by the end of this year. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Sure, you might think you love Scarface. But do you really love Scarface? Like, say, to the tune of $999.99?

That impressive figure is what it’ll cost you to get the limited-edition Blu-ray of the gangster classic, dropping Sept. 6, and it’s quite a jump from the $19.98 “Widescreen Two-Disc Anniversary Edition” DVD that’s currently on the market. So what does that extra $980.01 get you? Find out after the jump.

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Brian De Palma has made only a few features in the last ten years: the psycho-sexual thriller Femme Fatale (which I’ll defend until death), a shaky adaptation of James Ellroy’s novel The Black Dahlia, and the intriguing but not so successful Iraq war film Redacted. He’s had a couple other directorial prospects, but now he may remake a French film from Alain Corneau called Crime d’amour (Love Crime), in which a conflict between two competing female corporate executives leads to murder. Read More »

The quick-turnaround required to get another Paranormal Activity into cinemas this Halloween, and possibly kill the Saw franchise once and for all, will mean that Paramount will have to get production up and running very soon indeed.

You probably recall that Saw almuni Kevin Greutert was given the helm before a little contractual black magic from Lionsgate saw those plans dashed. Who then, might Paramount have in the frame for this eight-month wonder now?

It’s an astonishing shortlist. As well as Session 9‘s Brad Anderson and Wolf Creek‘s Greg McLean, the studio are reportedly also sizing up none other than Brian De Palma. Blimey.

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