Between American Horror Story and Sons of Anarchy, almost half of this post is FX teasers. After the jump:

  • Syfy will reboot the Brit cult sci-fi series Blake’s 7
  • Fox picks up a new comedy by the Parks & Rec team
  • Dwight-centric Office spinoff The Farm begins casting
  • Jessica De Gouw joins The CW’s Arrow as the Huntress
  • See Breaking Bad stars on old episodes of Seinfeld
  • Doctor Who gets a premiere date and a new trailer
  • Watch three more trailers for FX’s Sons of Anarchy
  • See more creepy teasers for American Horror Story

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We’re only one episode into the first half of the final season of Breaking Bad and, if you’re like me, you’re already dreading the end. Vince Gilligan‘s show is so good, so tense and so fun that every episode is like Christmas morning. With meth and murder. Still, every great show has to end and Breaking Bad has eight total episodes this year and then eight total episodes next year before hanging up the lab coat.

The show runner hasn’t decided what he’ll do after that, there’s still lots to do with this show, but one idea he’s floated around is a spin-off centering on Bob Odenkirk‘s sleazy, but smart, lawyer character Saul Goodman.

Read Gilligan’s pitch for the show and more after the jump. Read More »

Whether or not you watch AMC’s Breaking Bad, you’ve likely heard of Walt and Jesse, the two main characters brilliantly portrayed by Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul. As good as they are, though, they aren’t what make the show so great. It’s the side characters: Gus Fring portrayed by Giancarlo Esposito, Hector Salamanca played by Mark Margolis and, Saul Goodman played by Bob Odenkirk.

It was probably thought of as odd choice when show creator Vince Gilligan cast the man best known for Mr. Show as Breaking Bad‘s scumbag lawyer. Yet Odenkirk’s sense of humor has elevated the character to not only a true fan favorite, but one of the most different and surprising characters on TV today.

The fifth piece of art in the Breaking Bad Art Project is a tribute to Saul Goodman done by Chris DeLorenzo. Check it out below. Read More »

I am sure that all of you will have noticed the return of a blight to our streets. I refer, of course, to the extremely irritating… living statue. I’ve got a feeling that The Giant Mechanical Man wouldn’t play well in Edgar Wright’s heavily fictionalized home town of Sanford. Because while a giant silver-painted robot man isn’t quite as irritating as a living statue, it’s pretty close.

And yet, that’s what Jenna Fischer seems to fall for in The Giant Mechanical Man, a romantic comedy written and directed by Lee Kirk (Fischer’s husband) and also featuring Chris Messina, Malin Akerman, and Topher Grace. It’s Grace, wearing a wig and spouting self-help platitudes more irritating than any living statue, that comes closest to stealing the show in the trailer that you can find below. Read More »

Fresh off their Sundance short, The Terrys, there’s a rumor circulating on the Tracking Board that Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim are putting together a film called Tim and Eric’s Billion Dollar Movie. It would star the two comedians, best known for their recently ended Cartoon Network show Tim and Eric Awesome Show Great Job, in a “comedy adventure” about them owing one billion dollars. John C. Reilly, who has not only appeared on the Awesome Show but also spawned his own Tim and Eric spin-off, Check it Out With Dr. Steve Brule, is rumored to co-star as a character named Taquito. Read more of the rumored co-stars after the break. Read More »

Long before HBO was known for shows about organized crime, polygamy, cougars and Hollywood, it was known for cutting edge comedy. At the center of that was the cult sketch comedy show Mr. Show, co-created by Bob Odenkirk and David Cross. During its three-year run, the show excelled in irreverent, offensive but hilarious sketches. However, since it ended in 1998, with the exception of the Mr. Show spin-off movie Run Ronnie Run, the comedy duo have mostly walked their own paths.

According to this latest news, those paths might cross again soon. Odenkirk, who has been working as a director, is prepping a new film called Annie Jenkins: A Not Very Romantic Comedy and though he’s still acquiring financing, he has verbal commitments from Krysten Ritter, Rainn Wilson, Dennis Farina and, yes, David Cross, to appear. Read more after the jump. Read More »

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This article concludes /Film’s recaps and discussions for the third season of Breaking Bad. A spoiler warning applies after the jump for the recap and for the comments section. Meth heads welcome. For previous recaps, click here.

The season three finale, “Full Measures,” differed from those of previous seasons with a grisly cliffhanger that incidentally and tragically pushed one main character over the point of no return. Or did it? In recent days, the show’s creator, Vince Gilligan, has given three candid and revealing interviews wherein he’s cleared up a number of viewers’ apparent confusion over the very last scene. He’s done so in good humor, but I can’t recall a previous highly anticipated finale that needed the showmaker to later vouch his intent—and in Gilligan’s case he helmed the episode (his sole directorial effort of the season.) The initial confusion was due to the aim of a gun, which appeared to tilt to the right of the target before the trigger went off. And I’m guessing the immediate cut to black that followed only amplified some viewers’ doubts. “SMDH.” – David Chase.

Gilligan, who is refreshingly and perhaps too open about Breaking Bad‘s creative process, also stated that the writing team didn’t map the season’s arc at start, unlike they’ve done in the past. This revelation confirmed observations about the season’s touch-and-go feel cited in the previous recap with guest Sven Barth. After the jump, I address personal questions about the finale, where the show and characters are possibly headed, and analyze Gilligan’s post-ep comments. Thanks to the /Film commenters who left insightful and spirited opinions over the past dozen BB posts. Let us know what you thought of the finale and of the questions posed below.

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/Film will be recapping and discussing each episode of the third season of Breaking Bad. A spoiler warning applies after the jump for the recaps and for the comments section. For previous recaps, click here. Note: I skipped over episodes “Fly” and “Abiquiu” due to traveling (one leg of which sent me to Puerto Rico for the return of Kenny Powers).

This week, we discuss the shocking semi-finale “Half Measures” and the season’s flaws with the culture writer, white rapper, and L.A. personality known as Sven Barth. A discerning barbarian of boob tube and skateboard culture, Barth’s creative endeavors span the single “Baby I’m Black” and the cooking series The Shredding Chef on Fuel TV.

Hunter Stephenson: Okay Sven. I think we both agree Breaking Bad is superior to most TV series currently going. But I want to ask you: is the third season where the show went from being a great series to a good if uneven one? When the Cousins exited—empty characters hyped as a death rattle but comparable to a violent psych-out—I was hopeful the season would upswing. Instead, we got Rian Johnson‘s episode “Fly,” which was the best ep of the season but it also inadvertently juxtaposed how little time and writing was spent in other eps, before and after, on rewarding character development. The writers focused so intently this season on viewers’ anticipation of bad shit happening and murderous voodoo tension that Walt and Jesse often registered more like pawns of doom than people. “Fly” explored and deepened their individual personalities and psyches, and reexamined their flesh and blood bond. Nevermind that it was executed, due to sheer genius or budget restraints, in a one-room setting. Am I being too critical, or do you agree?

Sven Barth: I’ll start by saying Breaking Bad is, without a doubt, one of the best cable shows of the past few years. But to me, this season continues to have several problems not present in one and two. I was still excited to watch each episode but Jesse in particular became closer and closer to a mall-type caricature as the season marched on. And yeah, “Fly” was excellent. It hearkened back to the season two episode, “4 Days Out” about the RV battery. “Fly” exemplified why I got addicted to this show from day one, back when I was tuning in because I was invested in the characters foremost, sudden thrills second. Walt’s and Jesse’s day-to-day was more tangible, convincing. Now that they’re certified bad guys, that’s missing.

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