Andy Fairhurst Back to the Future prints
To celebrate it’s 30th anniversary of Back to the Future, Bottleneck Gallery has released Andy Fairhurst‘s 88MPH, part of his “Nerd’s Eye View” series, as a set of poster prints. The Back to the Future trilogy is brought to life on three 12 x 24 inch giclee prints on velvet fine art paper in a limited edition of only 125. Available now for $35 each or $95 for the complete set — get them before they sell out. I personally love the Back to the Future Part 2 art but not the other two as much. See all three of the Andy Fairhurst Back to the Future prints in larger detail, after the jump.
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Back to the Future

Outdoor movie screenings are so much fun. They’re not usually the ideal place to first see a movie, of course, but as a communal experience, where everyone knows the movie, it’s the best. Secret Cinema, however, is so much more than an outdoor screening series. It’s an outdoor screening coupled with a live performance and theme park experience where you not only watch the movie, you can live it.

Don’t know what we mean? A new video showing this past summer’s Back to the Future Secret Cinema event puts it into perspective. The organization not only rebuilt the town of Hill Valley; they have actors walking around, a beautiful big screening, and people performing the movie, under the movie, while you watch the movie. Check out a video of the greatest Back to the Future screening of all time below. Read More »

Back to the Future Matt Taylor Poster

We’ve covered a ton of Back to the Future illustrated poster prints over the years, but this one is definitely one of my favorites. Matt Taylor, an artist we’ve covered quite a few times in the past, has teamed up with Mondo to deliver a colorful Back to the Future poster print. The 18? x 24? sized print will be released at Thought Bubble in the UK in an edition of only 225. Hit the jump to see the full Back to the Future Matt Taylor poster now.

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DeLorean

There are few things cooler than people turning Back to the Future in reality. Be it a Hoverboard, pair of Nikes or Lego creation, fans of the trilogy love to get inspired to own a piece of the film.

In 2011, a video hit YouTube of a fan who had created an actual flying DeLorean from Back to the Future. Now, it’s on a much smaller scale, and they’re using four fans, but it’s a pretty excellent creation anyway. Check out the video below. Read More »

Back in Time Back to the Future Documentary

/Film readers, you’ve been recruited. The producer and director of a new Back to the Future documentary, Back in Time, have asked for your help. They’re well into production on a documentary about the history of Back to the Future and the long-lasting effect the film has had on popular culture. However, the twist is the film is being told through the eyes of the film’s third star: The DeLorean.

Director Jason Aron and producers Louis Krubich and Lee Leshen have traveled all over talking to people inspired by the film, many of whom own DeLoreans, and the next up is one of their biggest yet: Doctor Emmet Brown himself, Christopher Lloyd. Aron has created a video specifically for the /Film readers asking for questions they can ask Lloyd. Then, sometime in the future, we’ll be able to post his answers, even if they don’t make it into the final film.

Below, give us your best Christopher Lloyd question in the comments, check out some production stills from Back in Time and read more about the film. Read More »

Hendo Hover Promises a Working Hoverboard By 2015

Back to the Future II Hoverboard

Of all the futuristic 2015 technologies promised in Back to the Future Part II, the one we’re most disappointed hasn’t come to pass is the hoverboard. But there’s still one year until the date Marty McFly is scheduled to land, and Hendo Hover is determined to make hoverboards a reality in time for his arrival.

The company, led by Northern California couple Greg and Jill Henderson, are working hard to create a real, working hoverboard — with some help from Kickstarter, hopefully. Should all go well, the first hoverboards will be produced by October 21, 2015. Hit the jump for more details on the working hoverboard, including how you can buy one for yourself.

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Back to the Future

Today is October 21, 2014. In exactly one year, we’ll have Hoverboards, flying cars, Jaws 19 and a Cubs World Series victory. At least, that’s what Robert Zemeckis’ Back to the Future Part II surmised. And while it’s going to end up being totally wrong about all of it, it’s a date everyone is looking forward to.

2015 also marks the 30th anniversary of the first Back to the Future film, released on July 3, 1985. Much like we saw with Ghostbusters this year, plenty of celebrations are expected for the milestone from merchandise and screenings to documentaries and more. One new addition to the list is the announcement of special 30th anniversary screenings that’ll play at concert venues all over the world. There, the soundtrack of the film will be edited out so a full orchestra can perform Alan Silvestri‘s iconic score live. Even better? Silvestri is writing 15 minutes of new score for the performances.  Read More »

Back to the Future opening shot

A truly great shot is one you’ll never notice. It tells a story with no apparent effort, putting the audience right in the space needed to get ideas across with no interference between lens and eye. Filmmakers can take obvious pride in their attention-getting compositions. But I’d wager the shots for which many directors, cinematographers and crews feel the most pride are the ones that audiences never realize are incredibly difficult. One great example is very intricate Back to the Future opening shot.

There’s a lot of great stuff in Back to the Future, but I wouldn’t be surprised if many people have never thought about how challening the opening shot might have been. The /Film readership is a savvy bunch, many of you filmmakers and/or deep enthusiasts of the art of film, so it may be no surprise that the BTTF opening is a beast of a shot. Regardless, there’s something to be learned from dissecting how it was done. In a new interview, the film’s special effects supervisor Kevin Pike explains just how they did that long Back to the Future opening shot. Read More »

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