Not that anyone really cares, but the Teen Choice Awards apparently took place tonight. I mean how can you take any award show seriously that has a category like “Choice Bromantic Comedy” and where Step Up 2: The Streets can win Best Dramatic Film of the year?! The show will air on Monday at 8:00pm et/pt on FOX, but we have the list of movie related winners below.

Action Adventure:
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
Drama: Step Up 2: The Streets
Chick Flick: 27 Dresses
Bromantic Comedy: What Happens in Vegas
Comedy: Juno
Horror/Thriller: I Am Legend
Action Adventure: Hancock
Summer Movie Comedy: Get Smart
Actor – Drama: Channing Tatum, Stop-Loss
Actress – Drama: Keira Knightley, Atonement
Actress – Action Adventure: Rachel Bilson, Jumper
Actor – Comedy: Ashton Kutcher, What Happens in Vegas
Actress – Comedy: Ellen Page, Juno
Actor – Horror/Thriller: Will Smith, I Am Legend
Actress – Horror/Thriller: Jessica Alba, The Eye
Villain: Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Breakout Female: Ellen Page, Juno
Breakout Male: Drake Bell, Superhero Movie

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For the record, mastermind James Cameron want us to know that he refers to 3D as “stereo.” The director behind one of the most anticipated movies ever, AVATAR, just did an epic interview with Variety on the future of cinema (3D theatrical and 3D home viewing) and tossed in a fresh announcement about his follow-up to the 2009 sci-fi thriller. It won’t be Battle Angel (sigh). The man is on a mission, namely blasting the “3D is eye candy porn” stigma and naysayers into outer space…

Q: Right now, 3-D is pretty much being used for films that have some spectacle in them, whether it’s “Journey to the Center of the Earth” or “U2 3D”; nobody’s talking about using it for domestic dramas. But there are people wondering whether it will actually enhance the impact of character-driven stories. What are your thoughts on how 3-D changes the experience of watching actors act?

A: I plan to shoot a small dramatic film in 3-D, just to prove this point, after “Avatar.” In “Avatar,” there are a number of scenes that are straight dramatic scenes, no action, no effects. They play very well, and in fact seem to be enhanced by the stereo viewing experience. So I think this can work for the full length of a dramatic feature. However, filmmakers and studios will have to weigh the added cost of shooting in 3-D against the increased marketing value for that type of film.

Perhaps this next film will be even more revolutionary than AVATAR? I can’t fathom how There Will Be Blood or, let’s say, The Puffy Chair could benefit from the technology, but Cameron is dead set on it. Earlier on, he said he wished 300 was a 3D film, and the same goes for…Atonement. Imagine the bookcase thrust. Sorry, we’re dispelling 3D as eye-candy porn, I forgot. This makes a nice seg into Cameron’s notions on the 3D home viewing experience…

“As for 3-D in the home: The only limitation to having stereo viewing in the home is the number of titles currently available. When there is more product, the consumer electronics companies will make monitors and players. The technology exists and is straightforward. Samsung has already shipped 2 million plasma widescreens which can decode an excellent stereo image. There’s just no player to hook up to it right now.”

We’re edging a little too close to the home entertainment in Fahrenheit 451 with a 3D Cops in suburbia, no? Sounds like fun.

Discuss: Are you guys and gals ready for a world that paints all movies, even the gushy costume dramas, in 3D? Anyone bummed that Battle Angel won’t be next? Who’s taking up Cameron’s “it’s stereo, hombre,” campaign? Sexman is not.

Toronto Film Festival LogoToday I finally found some time to sit down and sift through the 352 official selections of the 2007 Toronto Film Festival. Many hours later, I present to you 65 must see movies at the Toronto International Film Festival. I did the work so that you don’t have to. So why should you care about these films if you’re not making the trip up to Canada in September?

In 1998, Variety acknowledged that the Toronto International Film Festival “is second only to Cannes in terms of high-profile pics, stars and market activity.” Roger Ebert has also said that “although Cannes is still larger, Toronto is more useful and more important….”

Toronto is essentially a preview of which Independent to mid-sized film releases might be big in the next five months. The festival is considered a launch pad for many studios to begin “Oscar-buzz” for their films.

How do I know that you should see these movies? Well, in most cases I don’t. I have seen some press screenings of a couple of the films listed below (Valley of Elah, My Kid Could Paint That…) and can personally recommend them. But for the most part, I have no idea. I have cobbled this list from an exhaustive day of research. Some of the films I chose because of the director, writer, or cast. Others because of the plot synopsis.

When a review was available, I read it. If a trailer was available, I watched it. I’ve included films that were recommended to me by trusted friends. Some films that I missed but were highly reviewed at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival (Son of Rambow, The Savages).

I must offer this disclaimer: I tend to be attracted to American, British and Japanese cinema to a fault. I do have a handful of picks outside my comfort realm, but if you’re looking for more “Worldly” selections, you might have to look elsewhere.

It should also be noted that some of the films (especially in the Gala and special presentation sections) will hit theaters within the next two months. Some films even hit theaters days within the festival’s conclusion. I put these movies on the list because they are movies of interest. But you, like me, might want to hold off on some of these flicks until they hit your city next month. For me, there are some films that I won’t be able to resist like Across The Universe and No Country for Old Men. I know they come out sooner rather than later, but I need to see them sooner. I’ve noted the release dates of films that are opening in the next two months, just so you have that information.

I’ll be at the festival for nine and a half days, so chances are, I won’t be able to see all of these films. The reality is, I won’t see even half of these films. I’ll be doing some interviews, so I’ve lowered my goal to around 30 movies, which most people would still consider extreme (that’s at least three movies each day of the festival).

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