Almost Famous

It’s no secret Cameron Crowe had problems giving his 2000 semi-autobiographical film a title. At one point it was actually called Untitled, a clever nod to the musical story held within, as well as an admission of defeat. The studio wouldn’t let that fly, so Crowe went through many different titles before settling on Almost Famous. And it’s a perfect title.

For a contribution to the 300th issue of Empire Magazine, Crowe dug up the original notebook pages where he brainstormed all kinds of different titles for the movie, much like William Miller does during the credits of the film. Check out Cameron Crowe’s alternate Almost Famous titles below. Read More »

.

Please Recommend /Film on Facebook

Lester Bangs Almost Famous

The death of Philip Seymour Hoffman was like a dagger through the heart of film lovers everywhere. Few have ever watched one of his movies and not instantly become a fan of Hoffman’s larger than life talent. In the day since his passing, coming to terms with the fact he’s actually gone is pretty difficult.

Some have dealt with Hoffman’s passing by paying tribute to the actor. One such tribute is a beautifully written piece by Cameron Crowe, who directed Hoffman in Almost Famous. The actor played rock critic Lester Bangs, and delivered the iconic line “The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone else when we’re uncool.” Crowe named his official site after the line. Today he talks about how Hoffman made that scene his own.

Read that, and watch two tribute videos, below. Read More »

Spectacular Now poster header

James Ponsoldt‘s wonderful film The Spectacular Now hits theaters August 2. It’s one of those serious, emotional, yet magical coming of age stories in the mold of films from the Eighties and Nineties. Films like Say Anything, Dazed and Confused, Almost Famous and The Breakfast Club. All four of those certainly influenced The Spectacular Now and they’re being screened to solidify that connection.

Nine cities across the country will be hosting four screenings on Tuesdays in July called The Spectacular Classics. The four films above will be preceded with an exclusive video introduction by Spectacular Now and 500 Days of Summer screenwriters Michael Weber and Scott Neustadter discussing the specific connections. And, if that’s not enough, audience members will also get a free ticket to see The Spectacular Now. Read More »

What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 28 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

Read More »

One of my favorite movies of all time is finally coming to Blu-ray, but you might have to search to find it — it will only be available in Best Buy stores. Paramount Home Entertainment is finally releasing Cameron Crowe‘s acclaimed drama Almost Famous (The Bootleg Edition) on Blu-ray on January 30th 2011. For those of you who don’t know, Almost Famous was edited down considerably for the theatrical release. While the 122 minute theatrical cut is probably the most publicly accessible version of the film, the bootleg “Untitled” cut is the true director’s cut of the movie — featuring about 40 minutes of additional footage. More details after the jump.

Read More »

What Is Your Favorite Movie Scene?

Almost Famous

Something I’ve been thinking about a lot lately is favorite movie scenes. One night while hanging out at Film School Rejects headquarters (where I was crashing for Fantastic Fest), FSR sexpert Bethany Perryman showed me her favorite movie scene of all time on YouTube. The scene involved a monologue in a congressional hearing, but that’s really not important. I realized while I was watching the sequence, something not about the movie but about the presenter. Movies can be an extremely personal experience, and while we don’t really even think about it, someone’s favorite scene says as much about a person as their favorite song or poem. I guess that is true of anything artful that is someone’s favorite. But for some reason or another, I had never thought about how this applies to someone’s favorite scene.

At Fantastic Fest, they have this awesome event called 100 Best Kills where people bring in DVDs, blu-rays, and VHS tapes of their favorite horror movie kills, which are played on screen for all to see. And most everyone knows, the kills are the best parts of most horror movies anyways. So it’s basically two hours of awesome. I was thinking about how I’d love to see the 100 Best Kills concept done with favorite scenes, but I’m not sure that it would be quite as interesting if you didn’t know the presenter of each clip. I started to think about my favorite scene of all time, why I connect with it and what this might say about me (you can read about my favorite scene after the jump).

Discuss: What is your favorite scene and why? What does it mean to you? Does it say anything about you?

Read More »

GeekBomb: Movies About Fanboys

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary added the word “fanboy” last year, and they list its first usage as 1919. Sadly, they don’t provide any examples for that usage. Curly Lambeau founded the Green Bay Packers that year in Wisconsin, but I don’t think he had throngs of fanboys around him just yet. For the record, Merriam-Webster defines a fanboy as, “A boy who is an enthusiastic devotee (as of comics or movies).” Interesting that they don’t include the term fangirl, which I hear all the time. Can’t a girl be just as enthusiastic as a boy, Merriam-Webster?

Although fanboys really came into common usage when it applied to comic book fans, since the 90s it’s come to cover enthusiasts of movies, video games, TV shows, music, and anything else people seem to line up for. It’s also grown out of its original usage as a derogatory word used to conjure up images of people like the Comic Book Guy on The Simpsons, and has become the marketing demographic that every company covets.

Given the rise of the power and size (no pun intended) of fans, it’s only normal that film cameras would start turning the other direction to document the phenomenon of fandom. First you have films that generate fans, then fans start making their own films, inspired by their fandom, then films that are made about the fans, and finally fictionalized movies depicting fans of fictional shows. It’s come full circle, and in today’s GeekBomb we explore the world of films about fans.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web: