2016 oscar snubs

The 2016 Oscar nominations are here and you know what that means: it’s time to start complaining!

To be fair, this year’s nominees gave us a lot to cheer about. Mad Max: Fury Road (/Film’s favorite movie of 2015) walked away with a stunning ten nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director. Other favorites, like Brooklyn, Spotlight, The Martian, and even Bridge of Spies racked up nods. As with any Oscar year, there was just as much to love as there was to hate.

So let’s give into our hate. And our confusion. And and our total bafflement. Because it wouldn’t be the Oscars without a bunch of big, weird surprises throwing everyone off track and inspiring furious debates about how wrong the Academy is on a yearly basis. Let’s run down the biggest snubs of the year.

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Steve Jobs

Aaron Sorkin is the rare screenwriter whose work is as instantly recognizable as any auteur director’s. Steve Jobs was described as an Aaron Sorkin movie just as often, if not more, as it was a Danny Boyle movie. The distinct rat-a-tat patter of his dialogue has also been heard in films by the likes of David Fincher (The Social Network) and Mike Nichols (Charlie Wilson’s War).

But now Sorkin’s going to go from just writing movies, to directing them. The Oscar-winning scribe is preparing to make his directorial debut with Molly’s Game, based on Molly Bloom‘s memoir about her years running an underground poker ring that catered to the Hollywood elite.  Read More »

2015 Writers Roundtable

A good movie always starts with the script, and that’s why you might want to pay attention to this year’s one-hour writers roundtable from The Hollywood Reporter’s annual awards series of discussions. This one includes the likes of Amy Schumer (Trainwreck), Aaron Sorkin (Steve Jobs), Emma Donoghue (Room), Tom McCarthy (Spotlight), Meg LeFauve (Inside Out) and Nick Hornby (Brooklyn), all talking about their career as writers, adapting material, working through self-doubt and much more. Read More »

Tim Cook talks Steve Jobs movies

Aaron Sorkin is a little bit of a softie. MoneyballStudio 6o on Sunset Strip, and Steve Jobs aren’t without heartwarming moments. In fact, in the case of Sorkin’s latest, some audiences and critics have taken issue with how soft the film goes in the final minutes. But Sorkin defends the ending. Read his comments on the Steve Jobs ending after the jump. (Warning: spoilers for Steve Jobs ahead.)

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Aaron Sorkin

Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network) often writes about characters in the workspace, so it’s not surprising to learn he once half-envisioned a Pixar movie about office supplies. Back in the 1990s, Sorkin was approached about writing a movie for the studio, but nothing ever came of it.

However, if you’ve ever wanted to know what that Aaron Sorkin Pixar movie would’ve looked like, find out after the jump.

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aaron sorkin screenwriting tips

I’ve rarely felt this annoyed in a movie theater. Next to me, during a screening of Steve Jobs, an elderly couple loudly whispers comments to each other every few minutes. With each line of dialogue they distract me from basking in, the more frustrated I grow. I’m afraid to ask them to keep quiet — not because I care how they’ll react, but out of fear of missing another line from the movie.

Aaron Sorkin writes anti-bathroom break movies. You don’t want to miss a scene or a line of his, especially in the case of his latest piece of work, the breathless, unrelentingly paced, and intricately structured Steve Jobs. By now, such an exciting piece of drama seems like a foregone conclusion from one of Hollywood’s most prolific, acclaimed, and all-around successful screenwriters. But past and present interviews with him have revealed not only how he pulls off these feats of genius, but how to start if you’re trying to create your own.

After the jump, learn writing tips from Steve Jobs screenwriter Aaron Sorkin.

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Danny Boyle Steve Jobs interview

Danny Boyle‘s Steve Jobs is my favorite movie of the year so far. I love so much about this film. I love how it’s a biopic without being a biopic. I love how it captures the truth and essence of a person, but probably 90% of the events and conversations in the movie never happened (or at very least, not at a keynote). I love Aaron Sorkin‘s intense dialogue and Michael Fasbender‘s performance — he may not look like Steve Jobs at the start of this movie, but by the end of the movie he transforms into the man.

Hit the jump to read my Danny Boyle Steve Jobs interview.

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Steve Jobs

Were you to go into Steve Jobs having no idea who Steve Jobs was, Steve Jobs wouldn’t really tell you. The character (played by Michael Fassbender) explains to a pissed-off Steve Wozniak (Seth Rogen) at one point that he “play[s] the orchestra” like a symphony conductor — but as Wozniak points out, it’s one of those sentences that sounds cool but doesn’t really mean anything in concrete terms.

For most biopics, this would be a failing, but for a Steve Jobs biopic in 2015, it’s an asset. We don’t need a movie to tell us who Steve Jobs is as a tech guru. I’m currently typing this review on my Apple keyboard, which is linked to my MacBook Air, with my iPhone 6 by my side; I know exactly who Steve Jobs, Apple CEO, is. Steve Jobs feels a revelation because it exposes Steve Jobs, the man.  Read More »

tim cook steve jobs movie

Biopics are a tricky business. If you make it with the full cooperation of the subject, you risk making a hagiography that glosses over every flaw and rough edge. If you make it without the support of the subject or their family, you risk dragging someone through the mud. So it’s not surprising that Apple CEO Tim Cook hasn’t been shy about expressing his disapproval over Danny Boyle‘s upcoming Steve Jobs. But will that change now that he’s apparently seen the movie?

Read the Tim Cook Steve Jobs movie comments after the jump.

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