Film critics have had decades to perfect the art of the long form movie review. The short form review however, made popular in the last few years thanks in part to Twitter and YouTube, is still in its infancy. It’s easy to blab on and on for 3,000 words about why a movie is good or bad, but to take all of those thoughts and squish them into 140 characters is difficult. That doesn’t stop thousands upon thousands of people from doing it though, myself included.

Then there’s Mr. Moviefone, aka Russ Leatherman, who does something similar: he publishes online movie reviews that last only six seconds. In that tiny window of time, he’s tries to tell you everything you need to know about a movie. Call it what you will but the idea seems to be paying off as Mr. Moviefone’s Six Second Reviews will now be turned into a syndicated radio segment. Read more about the deal and hear some of the Six Second Reviews after the break.

The Hollywood Reporter broke the news of the deal which will see the Elvis Duran Group syndicate the reviews, one feature and one DVD per day, to various radio stations across the country through a barter deal. The plan is to also turn the reviews into a television pilot as well.

We live in an A.D.D. world where people want to know quickly whether they should spend 10 bucks for a movie. Seven seconds is too long, and five seconds isn’t long enough.

Sounds like a quote about abs from There’s Something About Mary.

Here are some Six Second Reviews of new releases like Little Fockers and True Grit. What do you think?

I think these work, but I really hate his delivery. Just use your regular voice, it doesn’t have to sound all wacky-morning-guy. Plus, it’s hard to compete with the best Mr. Moviefone: Cosmo Kramer from Seinfeld. Check it out here (embedding was disabled. Boo).

Are these Six Second Reviews good for radio, TV or should they just be relegated to the Internet?

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About the Author

Germain graduated NYU's Tisch School of the Arts Cinema Studies program in 2002 and won back to back First Place awards for film criticism from the New York State Associated Press in 2006 and 2007.