Gravity set

Neil deGrasse Tyson’s complaints notwithstanding, Gravity has been hailed by most moviegoers as being one of the most realistic depictions of space travel ever put to film. It’s so realistic, in fact, that one reporter seemed fooled entirely.

At a recent press conference for the film, a journalist asked director Alfonso Cuarón about the challenges of shooting in space. The guy probably wasn’t being entirely serious — it turns out he works for a comedy show — but he later defended his question anyway, saying, “Don’t tell me I was the only one who had that doubt.” Hit the jump to watch how it all went down.

Gawker got the scoop on the bizarre line of inquiry. ”What were the technical and human difficulties of filming in space?” Carlos “El Capi” Pérez  asked the director at a press event in Mexico City. “Was it very difficult, very complicated to film in space? Did the camera operators get sick?”

Cuarón chose to play along, as the attendees laughed. “Well, yes, we took some cameras there aboard the Soyuz. We were in space for three-and-a-half months,” he said. “I got really sick during training.”

Pérez is a a field reporter for the satirical talk show Deberían Estar Trabajando (which translates to “You Should Be Working”), which casts some doubt on his sincerity. After all, we’ve seen people like The Daily Show‘s Samantha Bee and Da Ali G Show‘s Ali G ask similarly absurd questions for comic effect.

For what it’s worth, though, Latin Times reports, “Those present at the scene felt the reporter was being serious and did not feel this was a joke for the cameras.” And in any case, Pérez stands by his question. “Excuse me Twitter for being a professional committed to information,” he tweeted. “Don’t tell me I was the only one who had that doubt.”

Here’s a video of the incident. Cuarón does an admirable job of maintaining a straight face (which is really the fun part here) but the audience does not.

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