The Lobster (1)

We’ve got all kinds of romances at the cinema this year. Love is blossoming amid zombie apocalypses and inspiring superpowered vengeance and overcoming Nicholas Sparks-ian brushes with death. But when it comes to sheer weirdness, all of these love stories pale in comparison to Yorgos Lanthimos‘ The Lobster, which is set in a world where singletons who can’t find a mate within 45 days are turned into an animal of their choosing.

Colin Farrell leads The Lobster as sad-sack David, who’s just been left by his wife. He’s whisked away to an idyllic retreat for single people, all of whom have come with the same goal in mind: find a “well matched” spouse so they don’t have to spend the rest of their lives as a dog, or a horse, or in David’s case, a lobster. And that’s just the starting point for the surreal joy and pain that unfolds. Watch The Lobster U.S. trailer below.  Read More »

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The Birth of a Nation

Today the 2016 Sundance Film Festival is coming to a close, and Saturday night, the awards for feature filmmaking were handed out to the movies that played in Park City, Utah. The big prizes from the festival are the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award, one given by a select group of jurors and the other chosen by the festival attendees themselves. In 2014, Whiplash took both awards, and this year we have another film taking the two honors as Nate Parker‘s slave rebellion tale The Birth of a Nation was announced to receive both.

Find out the full list of other 2016 Sundance Film Festival awards winners below. Read More »

Indignation Review

After finding fame as the titular hero in the Percy Jackson fantasy franchise, Logan Lerman has started to carve an impressive acting career over the past few years with praiseworthy performances in films such as The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Fury. But his latest leading turn in Indignation, an adaptation of Philip Roth‘s novel of the same name, shows the outstanding talent that Lerman has when given the right role. Indignation has the best performance of Logan Lerman’s career, and it helps that the film surrounding this stellar work is brilliant as well. Keep reading for my full Indignation review. Read More »

Kevin Smith

This past weekend brought the premiere of Kevin Smith‘s latest effort as writer and director, the absolutely insane Yoga Hosers, at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival. If you want to know just how truly nutty this movie is, check out Peter Sciretta’s full review on the movie right here, or watch the clip that was released before the premiere.

Yours truly was curious enough to check out the movie that is like a PG-13 Disney Channel nightmare as only Kevin Smith can deliver, and before and after the film, Smith had a couple interesting things to say about how he’s approaching filmmaking now as well as what we can expect from Moose Jaws. Read More »

Fundamentals of Caring Review

Often times at Sundance you see the same stories played out with different characters. This year alone, for example, there are two movies about an estranged New York man returning home when his mother comes down with a debilitating ailment. Familiar indie stories don’t always work on the festival circuit, but sometimes when the right cast comes together, a decent amount of magic happens. Such is the case with The Fundamentals of Caring, a road trip comedy with heart based on Jonathan Evison‘s bestselling novel of nearly the same name and starring British sensation Craig Roberts (Submarine) and the always reliable Paul Rudd. Keep reading the Fundamentals of Caring review after the jump. Read More »

The Hollars review

Angie Han’s review of Other People began by pointing out that the film “sounds like the most stereotypical of Sundance movies” but “in practice, every element is so well executed that the film itself feels like something special.” The same could be said of John Krasinski‘s The Hollars, which shares many of the same Sundance cliches. But The Hollars has an incredible ensemble cast that pushes this film from just another screening on the Sundance schedule to a funny and charming movie that will probably play at a theater near you.

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Sing Street Review

When you come to the Sundance Film Festival, you can’t wait to fall in love with a movie. As a sucker for coming-of-age movies, I’m always looking for one that really makes me run the gamut of emotions, and if it also has a hellacious soundtrack, fantastic breakout performances, and a glamorous reference to Back to the Future, then that’s even better. That’s why Sing Street, from Once and Begin Again director John Carney, is marvelous, delightful and just plain great. Read my full Sing Street review after the jump. Read More »

Swiss Army Man

About five minutes into Swiss Army Man, you’re faced with a choice. By this point in the film, you’ll have seen Hank (Paul Dano), a man stranded alone on a desert island, try to hang himself. His suicide attempt is interrupted by the arrival of a corpse (Daniel Radcliffe) that proves to be a prolific farter. Hank opts not to kill himself, and instead rides “Manny” like a flatulence-powered jet ski in the direction of civilization.

The scene is weird, and absurd, and crude, and dark, but kind of beautiful, too, and it’s at this point you have to make a decision: Either you’re willing to go with a movie that delights in all of those unsavory qualities, or you’re not. If you decide you’re not, know that Swiss Army Man will only get stranger and ruder, and you’re probably better off putting it back on the shelf until you’re in the mood for it. If you decide you are, however, you’ll discover a unique, oddly gorgeous adventure anchored by a superb performance from Radcliffe as a dead body (no, really).  Read More »

Sleight

Sleight is like Doug Liman’s Go crossed with Now You See Me, with a side of Chronicle. Smart, fun, and thrilling, JD Dillard‘s feature film debut will likely be a fast sale at Sundance as it provides some great high concept ideas at a micro budget.

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