Message from the King Trailer

Audiences have quickly become familiar with Chadwick Boseman thanks to his turns as Black Panther in Captain America: Civil War, soul man James Brown in Get On Up, and color barrier-breaking baseball player Jackie Robinson in 42. But will they turn out to see him get revenge in his own action thriller?

Message from the King stars Chadwick Boseman as Jacob King, a man who comes to Los Angeles to find his sister Bianca, who has suddenly lost contact with him. Tracking her movements leads him to a seedy underbelly of crime and drugs where some dangerous people aren’t very happy that he’s trying to find out what happened to Bianca. But King isn’t easily intimated by this band of thugs, who are led by Alfred Molina and Luke Evans.

Watch the Message from the King trailer below, but beware because there’s a quick flash of nudity in there. Read More »

Their Finest Trailer

Hollywood loves making movies about making movies, and even though Lone Scherfig‘s World War II romantic dramedy Their Finest actually hails from across the pond, it’s still looking for that sweet spot of nostalgia for classic filmmaking crossed with the hardships of war.

After playing at the Toronto International Film Festival last year and the Sundance Film Festival just last month, Their Finest follows the making of a movie about the heroic events of a couple sisters at Dunkirk who save hundreds of soldiers. Sadly, it’s not anywhere near as compelling as we hope Christopher Nolan’s movie about Dunkirk will be, but Their Finest is coming to US theaters this spring, delivering lighthearted laughs, sappy romance, and stilted war drama. Watch the new Their Finest trailer after the jump to get a taste of the film. Read More »

Trespass Against Us Trailer - Michael Fassbender

Recently Michael Fassbender has played a mutant on a mission, a man with a Macintosh, and Macbeth. Now he finds himself in a caravan family of criminals in a new indie thriller.

Trespass Against Us sees Michael Fassbender as Chad Cutler, one chain in three generations of a family who have been outlaws living in the country for decades. Brendan Gleeson plays his father who proudly passes the mantle down, but it appears there’s a kink in the chain as Chad realizes he doesn’t want his son Tyson to follow in his footsteps. Though he’s attempted to stop his criminal ways, he can’t help but take on one last job from his father in order to finally leave it all behind.

Watch the new Trespass Against Us trailer after the jump. Read More »

Sing Review

Note: With Sing out this weekend, we’re re-running our review from the TIFF.

Since Despicable Me, Illumination Entertainment has established itself as a go-to source for sturdy family entertainment. Their films may not reach the artistic heights of Pixar or Disney, but you can generally count on them to be perfectly pleasant and inoffensive, able to entertain the kids without annoying the parents.

Sing is Illumination’s first musical, but otherwise it’s cut from the same cloth as the company’s other films. While not especially deep, the combination of a star-studded cast and an equally star-studded music catalogue make for a fun time. It’s light and sweet and pretty as cotton candy, and it dissolves from memory just as quickly.  Read More »

NOCTURNAL ANIMALS review

Note: With Nocturnal Animals out this weekend, we’re re-running our review from TIFF.

There’s a lot to admire about Nocturnal Animals, the second feature from Tom Ford. The narrative is actually two narratives, beautifully braided together by Ford and brought to life by Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal. It’s pretentious pulp, in a good way — engaging to watch and pretty to behold. But Nocturnal Animals seems to be aiming for profundity, and there it falls short. It’s trying to say something, but what isn’t exactly clear.  Read More »

Loving review

Note: With Loving in limited release this weekend, we’re re-running our review from the TIFF.

Jeff Nichols has never been one for outsized drama. It’s not that dramatic things don’t happen in his movies — on the contrary, his films are full of superpowered kids and apocalyptic dreams and the like. But he often seems less interested in big events than in all the moments in between, the everyday bonds and minute details that make up the textures of everyday life.

In Loving, Nichols applies that same approach to the 1967 Supreme Court case Loving v. Virginia, which struck down anti-miscegenation laws across the country. Aided by awards-worthy performances from Joel Edgerton and especially Ruth Negga, Nichols delivers an intimate drama that feels all the bigger for keeping its scope so resolutely small.  Read More »

Never Happened Short Film

We’ve seen plenty of movies about romantic affairs happening behind the backs of significant others. However, in Mark Slutsky‘s short film Never Happened, which played at the Toronto International Film Festival, there’s a world where those cheating on their husbands and wives or boyfriends and girlfriends don’t have to worry about lying. That’s because there’s a sci-fi twist that changes the way people keep their adulterous behavior from each other.

Watch the Never Happened short film after the jump. Read More »

Black Mirror Season 3 Review

It’s been nearly two years since the last episode of Black MirrorCharlie Brooker‘s tech dystopia anthology series, and over three years since the last proper full season aired. Naturally, then, news that Netflix had commissioned 12 more episodes was met with a combination of excitement and trepidation.

On the one hand, Black Mirror is second to none when it comes to chronicling the way humanity and technology intersect in 2016. On the other, we’ve seen tons of shows renewed after extended hiatuses, only to return as shells of their former selves. Could the third season of Black Mirror live up to the greatness of the first two? Based on the two episodes that screened at TIFF, “San Junipero” and “Nosedive,” the answer seems to be yes.  Read More »

La La Land Review

“They don’t make ’em like this anymore” is a frequent lament when it comes to movies, but it couldn’t be truer in the case of La La Land, an unabashedly old-fashioned musical directed by Whiplash‘s Damien Chazelle. Set in contemporary Los Angeles — with just enough modern-day flourishes to remind you that this is a movie made and set in the 2010s, not the 1950s — La La Land follows a struggling pianist and an aspiring actress who fall in love but find their separate dreams threatening to pull them apart. It’s a story as old as Hollywood and jazz, and Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone feel like a pairing for the ages.

Read More »

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The Belko Experiment Review

James Gunn has been tied up with Marvel movies for the past couple of years, but somewhere in there, he found the time to write and produce The Belko Experiment. Greg McLean, the Aussie filmmaker behind the nasty Wolf Creek films, takes the helm, and the result is a simple, entertaining horror-thriller that doesn’t take itself too seriously.  Read More »