The Telluride Film Festival, a presentation of the National Film Preserve which takes place beginning tomorrow, Friday Sept 2 and runs through Monday Sept 5, is an unusual beast as far as film festivals go. The core film lineup is not announced until the day before the festival begins, so attendees have to commit to the fest without knowing any of the movies that will definitely play.

Now the first list of films is out, and it has some expected inclusions such as David Cronenberg‘s A Dangerous Method (trailer) and the Cannes fave The Artist (trailer). In addition there are some good surprises, such as Steve McQueen and Michael Fassbender‘s reunion, Shame (pics), and the Dardenne BrothersThe Kid With a Bike.

More films will be announced at the last minute over the next couple days. One addition, for example, according to Kris Tapley, is Butter. Peter is arriving in Telluride later today so he’ll have coverage of the festival during the holiday weekend. Check out the announced lineup below. Read More »

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Danny Boyle directing 127 Hours

Danny Boyle‘s new film 127 Hours premiered at the Telluride Film Festival to rave reviews (including my own). Last week we published an interview with Aron Ralston, the man who survived 127 hours after a boulder trapped him in an isolated canyon and inspired the film. Today we bring you an interview with filmmaker Danny Boyle, who brought Ralston’s story to the big screen.

127 HOURS is the new film from Danny Boyle, the Academy Award winning director of last year’s Best Picture, SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE. 127 HOURS is the true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston’s (James Franco) remarkable adventure to save himself after a fallen boulder crashes on his arm and traps him in an isolated canyon in Utah. Over the next five days Ralston examines his life and survives the elements to finally discover he has the courage and the wherewithal to extricate himself by any means necessary, scale a 65 foot wall and hike over eight miles before he is finally rescued. Throughout his journey, Ralston recalls friends, lovers (Clémence Poésy), family, and the two hikers (Amber Tamblyn and Kate Mara) he met before his accident. Will they be the last two people he ever had the chance to meet? A visceral thrilling story that will take an audience on a never before experienced journey and prove what we can do when we choose life.

Earlier this week, Alex from FirstShowing and I got the opportunity to sit down with Boyle and discuss the film. Watch the video interview after the jump.

Read More »

Never Let Me Go

After the Telluride Film Festival premiere of his latest film, I had the opportunity to sit down and interview director Mark Romanek for a long-form interview.  It was a collaboration between Alex from FirstShowing and myself, which explains how we were able to get so much time with the filmmaker.

Mark Romanek is one of the best music video directors to come out of the 1990’s. His videos have included Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer”, “Scream” – Michael Jackson’s grammy award winning collaboration with sister Janet Jackson (at $7 million, one of the most expensive music video ever made), Janet Jackson’s “Got ‘Til It’s Gone”, Johnny Cash’s gut-wrenching cover of Nine Inch Nails’ “Hurt”, En Vogue’s “Free Your Mind”, Lenny Kravitz’s “Are You Gonna Go My Way”, Beck’s “Devil’s Haircut”, Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” and Fiona Apple’s “Criminal”. His 2002 feature film One Hour Photo is probably best known for Robin Williams’ dramatic turn. While the film is beloved by cinephiles, it pretty much went under the radar of mainstream audiences. It did however gain Romanek a lot of the respect in the movie industry. His follow-up, a big screen adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro‘s novel Never Let Me Go, premiered at the 37th Telluride Film Festival. The book was named one of TIME’s 100 Best Novels (from 1923 to the Present), featured on many top ten books of 2005 lists, and a finalist in the National Book Critic Circle Award.

We ran the first part of the interview yesterday, click here if you missed it. After the jump is part two of the chat, where we talk about the casting for Never Let Me Go, deleted scenes, what’s up next, the state of the music video industry, clarifying the Guinness Book of World Records-perpetrated lie that he was responsible for the most expensive music video ever made, why Michael Jackson/Janet Jackson‘s “Scream” cost so much, the wonders of creative producing, and what he thought of Joe Johnston‘s The Wolfman. Hit the jump to read the interview.

Read More »

Never Let Me Go

After the Telluride Film Festival premiere of his latest film, I had the opportunity to sit down and interview director Mark Romanek for a long-form interview. It was a collaboration between Alex from FirstShowing and myself, which explains how we were able to get so much time with the filmmaker.

Mark Romanek is one of the best music video directors to come out of the 1990’s. His videos have included Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer”, “Scream” – Michael Jackson’s grammy award winning collaboration with sister Janet Jackson (at $7 million, one of the most expensive music video ever made), Janet Jackson’s “Got ‘Til It’s Gone”, Johnny Cash’s gut-wrenching cover of Nine Inch Nails’ “Hurt”, En Vogue’s “Free Your Mind”, Lenny Kravitz’s “Are You Gonna Go My Way”, Beck’s “Devil’s Haircut”, Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” and Fiona Apple’s “Criminal”. His 2002 feature film One Hour Photo is probably best known for Robin Williams’ dramatic turn. While the film is beloved by cinephiles, it pretty much went under the radar of mainstream audiences. It did however gain Romanek a lot of the respect in the movie industry. His follow-up, a big screen adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro‘s novel Never Let Me Go, premiered at the 37th Telluride Film Festival. The book was named one of TIME’s 100 Best Novels (from 1923 to the Present), featured on many top ten books of 2005 lists, and a finalist in the National Book Critic Circle Award.

After the jump is part one of the chat, where we talk about the director’s influences, how he became a music video director, his long journey back to feature filmmaking, and what it took to create his latest movie, Never Let Me Go.

Read More »

I havent seen a lot of films since getting to Telluride, but I’ve been seeing some of the important ones — which has really paid off. We arrived in Colorado on Thursday night. Friday was the premiere of Mark Romanek’s Never Let Me Go, Saturday afternoon was the surprise premiere of Danny Boyle’s 127 Hours, and Sunday was the surprise screening of Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan. If you haven’t read my reviews of these great films, I recommend you do as they are some of the best films I’ve experienced this year (so far).

Read More »

You might not immediately recognize Aron Ralston‘s name but you’ve heard about his story. It was all over the news, turned into a New York Times bestselling book, and adapted for te big screen by filmmaker Danny Boyle.

127 HOURS is the new film from Danny Boyle, the Academy Award winning director of last year’s Best Picture, SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE. 127 HOURS is the true story of mountain climber Aron Ralston’s (James Franco) remarkable adventure to save himself after a fallen boulder crashes on his arm and traps him in an isolated canyon in Utah. Over the next five days Ralston examines his life and survives the elements to finally discover he has the courage and the wherewithal to extricate himself by any means necessary, scale a 65 foot wall and hike over eight miles before he is finally rescued. Throughout his journey, Ralston recalls friends, lovers (Clémence Poésy), family, and the two hikers (Amber Tamblyn and Kate Mara) he met before his accident. Will they be the last two people he ever had the chance to meet? A visceral thrilling story that will take an audience on a never before experienced journey and prove what we can do when we choose life.

127 Hours premiered at the Telluride Film Festival to rave reviews (including my own). On Sunday, Alex from FirstShowing and I got the opportunity to sit down with the man himself. Watch the video interview after the jump.

Read More »

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Telluride Review: Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan

Before Darren Aronofsky left the stage at the 37th Telluride Film Festival in the introduction of his new film, Black Swan, he apologized to the crowd: “I’m really sorry. I want to apologize for what’s about to happen… I didn’t know what I was doing…” With that he walked off stage and the lights went down. Aronofsky’s apology was directed at people like the older couple seated to my right. Maybe they were lured in by the star power of Natalie Portman, the story of a ballet dancer, or possibly because they loved that movie about the professional wrestler and the stripper. Whatever the reason, they had no idea what they were getting themselves into. And why should they? Black Swan is unlike anything I’ve ever seen before.

Read More »

Telluride Review: Danny Boyle’s 127 Hours

Two years ago, Danny Boyle came to Telluride to give the surprise premiere of Slumdog Millionaire, a movie which was almost doomed to be a direct-to-dvd but was saved by Fox Searchlight at the last minute. The film played to a standing ovation, and as you know, went on to critical acclaim and Academy Award wins. So it isn’t much of a surprise that Boyle decided to come back to Telluride to premiere his follow-up, 127 Hours, a big screen adaptation of of the New York Times bestselling book Between a Rock and a Hard Place. The film is based on the true story of Aron Ralston, a engineer/ mountain climber who amputated his own arm to free himself after being trapped by a boulder for nearly five days.

Many of you probably know Boyle as the English director behind  Trainspotting, 28 Days Later, A Life Less Ordinary, The Beach, Sunshine and Slumdog Millionaire. His stylized character-centric films have won him many awards including “Best Director” at the 2009 Academy Awards. As you may expect, Boyle doesn’t take a realistic doc-style approach to the filming of this story, but instead injects it with energy and life while retaining the authenticity of the experience.

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neverletmegoposter-slice

A lot of you probably might not recognize Mark Romanek‘s name, but you’ve almost certainly seen his work. He was probably one of the best music video directors to come out of the 1990’s. His videos have included Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer”, “Scream” – Michael Jackson’s grammy award winning collaboration with sister Janet Jackson (at $7 million, it might forever hold the title as the most expensive music video ever made), Janet Jackson’s “Got ‘Til It’s Gone”, Johnny Cash’s gut-wrenching cover of Nine Inch Nails’ “Hurt”, En Vogue’s “Free Your Mind”, Lenny Kravitz’s “Are You Gonna Go My Way”, Beck’s “Devil’s Haircut”, Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” and Fiona Apple’s “Criminal”.

His 2002 feature film One Hour Photo is probably best known for Robin Williams’ dramatic turn. While the film is beloved by cinephiles, it pretty much went under the radar of mainstream audiences. It did however gain Romanek a lot of the respect in the movie industry. His follow-up, a big screen adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro‘s novel Never Let Me Go, premiered at the 37th Telluride Film Festival. The book was named one of TIME’s 100 Best Novels (from 1923 to the Present), featured on many top ten books of 2005 lists, and a finalist in the National Book Critic Circle Award.

Read More »