Intramural

Like many sports movie fans, I find the conventions of the sports movie both stultifyingly familiar yet oddly comforting. So when I saw the trailer for Andrew Disney’s Intramural recently, I knew I’d have check it out at the 2014 Seattle International Film Festival. While /Film readers didn’t really warm to the film’s trailer when it debuted, I found the Intramural to be quite charming and hilarious — a lovingly made Dodgeball-esque lampooning of a genre that has become all-too-familiar.

I had a chance to chat with Intramural writer Bradley Jackson about his favorite sports movie tropes, and why Air Bud 4 sullies the realism of the Air Bud franchise. See our video interview after the jump.
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Time Lapse Movie

Let’s say you’re making a sci-fi film featuring a camera that takes pictures of what happens 24 hours in the future. You’d probably need a lot of note cards to make sure you keep all the events of the film straight. That, plus yarn to connect different scenes and photos together. Lots and lots of yarn…

Time Lapse just had its North American debut at the Seattle International Film Festival, and it definitely makes great use of this time-bending camera premise. I thought the film was a super fun genre exercise, a thriller that reminded me of Timecrimes and old-school Twilight Zone episodes. The film is immensely satisfying, especially for a person like me who loves the use of time travel paradoxes in films. No detail in this film is wasted as it barrels towards its inevitable conclusion, and all previous plot points lock into place.

But there are also a lot of challenges associated with making a film like this. I chatted with the filmmakers, BP Cooper and Bradley King about the difficulties of keeping all the events straight, as well as which other time travel movies inspired them. Learn more about Time Lapse at the film’s website and check out our video interview after the jump.
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SIFF 2014: Making a Movie for $6,000

layoverphoto2

This weekend, I saw a movie at the Seattle International Film Festival that had a budget of $6,000. Joshua Caldwell’s Layover, which had its world premiere here, was shot in 11 days in Los Angeles and takes place during the course of a single evening, as a itinerant frenchwoman Simone (played by Nathalie Fay) re-connects with a friend from her past. Layover is a film in the tradition of Linklater’s Before series, and I found that it perfectly captured the paradox encountered by many a millenial: feeling trapped, while also realizing that the possibilities for your life are still endless. It’s a beautiful, moving, and wistful film.

But what goes into making a film with a budget that’s slightly more than the cost of the camera you’d need to shoot it on? I spoke with Caldwell about how he shot the film and why he went the low-budget route. Find our conversation after the jump, watch the film’s trailer, and be sure to check out the Indiegogo campaign for Caldwell’s next two films.
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Boyhood

This week marks the start of the 40th annual Seattle International Film Festival, a 3-week movie extravaganza featuring over 270 feature films. That is, by any measure, an ungodly number of movies, and the whole thing can be pretty damn overwhelming. This will be my third year attending the festival I’m really looking forward to seeing a bunch of films, but I’ve narrowed it down to the five that I’m most looking forward to. Find them after the jump.
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