Man Who Killed Don Quixote clips

Considering its disastrous production history, cinephiles have adopted an “I’ll believe it when I see it” attitude when it comes to Terry Gilliam‘s highly troubled The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. But after decades of starts and stops, the day has come where we can believe without a doubt that the movie finally exists. Three actual, honest to God clips from this movie have hit the internet, and you can watch them ahead of the film’s long-awaited premiere during the closing night of this year’s Cannes Film Festival.
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nude review

A row of women, bent over on the river bank, uniform, toiling away at dirty laundry on the outskirts of their village. One of them, Yamuna (Kalyanee Mulay) breaks formation. She turns to dive into the water, and to free herself from the shackles of tradition and gendered expectation. The mere swerve of her foot towards the river feels like an enormous gesture. As she swims to a quiet inlet, she spies on another woman, swinging from the branches, youthful, carefree and detached from concern. But in a moment, that freedom feels curtailed, when a man swims up to the woman on the tree. He is her lover, but there’s something amiss about the setting. Something intrusive about this male presence, sexualizing a moment that ought to feel untethered from time.

Within seconds and without words, Ravi Jadhav’s Marathi-language Nude establishes its emotional stakes, presenting a pristine vision of freedom before snatching it away. The rest of its runtime – a melodic 110 minutes that you’d wish lasted longer – follows Yamuna trying to win back this fleeting feeling. First, by escaping her abusive husband and moving to Mumbai. Next, by becoming a nude model at a college of the arts.

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Jessica Chastain - Saturday Night Live January 2018 Hosts

Everything surrounding Jessica Chastain‘s highly anticipated spy movie 355 has remained top secret. Until now. When the star-studded cast — including Lupita Nyong’o, Marion Cotillard, Penelope Cruz, and Fan Bingbing —united at Cannes, the first few plot details for what sounds like the best spy movie of this decade were revealed. If you weren’t ready to throw all your money at this movie already, be prepared to empty your entire wallet.

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the man who killed don quixote

The troubles never cease for The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. True to its title, the universe seems adamant on striking this project dead, even as the film has been completed and heads to the Cannes Film Festival to make its world premiere. Because now, the distribution of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote — and the health of its director — is at stake.

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the party's just beginning review

Karen Gillan is still a relatively unknown quantity in the U.S. After shooting to cult success in Doctor Who, Gillan muddled through a few obscure comedy roles before getting her big break as Nebula in Guardians of the Galaxy. But her prosthetic-covered, blue painted face has hindered her chance at widespread recognition, though her performance in Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle may have finally earned her the attention she deserves — if people could see beyond the Rock’s pecs.

She deserved to shoot to stardom with the unfortunately titled 2014 TV series Selfie, in which Gillan played a vain, selfish, and damaged heroine addicted to the instant gratification of social media. She gave a stunning performance in a show that was seen by too few and that was gone too soon. But Gillan’s directorial debut, The Party’s Just Beginning, takes that damaged, troubled character and runs with it — spawning an intriguing heroine for a dark, oddball film that deals with the lasting damages of grief.

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Cannes feud

A battle between Netflix and France’s Cannes Film Festival has been raging since 2017, but are we finally seeing the first signs of a possible peace between the two entities?

Earlier this week, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings admitted that Netflix “made mistakes” during the streaming service’s tussle with the prestigious French film festival, marking the first time that anyone on either side has blinked in this particular staring contest. Read Hastings’ full comment about Netflix’s Cannes feud below. Read More »

toff guys

Guy Ritchie burst onto the scene with a string of hyper-stylized, hyper-violent British crime movies. With the one-two punch of Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch in 1998 and 2000, respectively, it was clear that a bold new crime caper director had entered the industry. But Ritchie has since expanded his catalogue, moving onto Sherlock Holmes mystery movies, sleek spy films, and Arthurian fantasy epics. All the while he kept his trademark slow-mo style, but it wasn’t quite the same.

Now, Ritchie is returning to the British gangster genre that helped launch him to fame with Toff Guys.

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all about nina review

Movies about comedians are usually a gamble. Often they’re too self-indulgent, or mawkish, or overly mean-spirited. Rarely do they balance the high drama of comedians’ inherent insecurities and the, you know, comedy. But the few that do succeed because they strike a personal chord — one that mirrors the self-deprecating performance and painfully real revelations of a good stand-up set.

All About Nina is as personal as you can get. Written and directed by Eva VivesAll About Nina is a searing, semi-autobiographical portrait of a troubled young woman trying to make her big break in the comedy scene. Played with an intoxicating swagger by Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Nina is an abrasive stand-up comedian who never shies away from provoking people on and off-stage, but hides a dark past of her own.

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Song of Back and Neck review

Do we really need another sad middle-age white guy comedy? Probably not, but if we have to have them, at least let them be more like Paul Lieberstein’s Song of Back and Neck. The artist best known to audiences as Toby from TV’s The Office makes his first step behind the camera for feature filmmaking to largely positive results, handling some slightly morose material with equal parts sincerity and dry humor.

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maine review

If you see Maine features a woman hiking a trail alone and assume you’re in for a retread of Wild, think again. In upstart director Matthew Brown’s sophomore feature, we see people fleeing the burdens of their life in the great outdoors in search of escape and fulfillment – but ultimately finding neither. The answers to life’s problems do not simply appear out of thin air in the woods, as much as the film’s two hikers might try to will them into existence. And yet, there’s catharsis in the film’s complete lack of cathartic moments, just as there’s deep feeling in the emotional reserve and an intense connection with characters who can never get outside of themselves to connect to each other.

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