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This past weekend, the /Filmcast held its 10-hour marathon podcast benefiting FilmAid. It was an action packed affair featuring long segments with many of the most popular filmmakers in Hollywood today. We had appearances from Rian Johnson (Looper), Jason Reitman (Up in the Air), David Wain (Wet Hot American Summer), Damon Lindelof (Lost), Bryan Singer (X-Men: Days of Future Past), Edgar Wright (Scott Pilgrim vs. the World), Jon M. Chu (G.I. Joe Retaliation) and more.

Over the course of the broadcast (which you can read more about here; check back soon for downloadable segments) many of those filmmakers provided juicy, newsy tidbits. You can read them after the jump, including Rian Johnson’s thoughts on the new season of Breaking Bad, Jason Reitman’s almost-foray into the X-Men universe and when we can expect to see the trailer for Edgar Wright’s The World End. Read More »

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Director Errol Morris has made a career out of solving mysteries, which comes as no surprise since the man used to be a private detective. Whether he was exonerating Randall Dale Adams in The Thin Blue Line or unraveling a sordid sex tale in Tabloid, Morris has deftly used his subjects to provide gripping accounts of situations that have been wrapped in intrigue and ambiguity.

In his book, Believing is Seeing, Morris turns his attention to the art of photography.  In a series of photographic whodunnits, Morris explores the truth-telling capacity of photos. His conclusion? “Photographs don’t have truth value.”

I had a chance to sit down with Morris in his Cambridge, MA office during his recent book tour and chat extensively with him about the nature of photography, the plausibility of re-enactments, and Joyce McKinney’s controversial reaction to Tabloid. After the break, read highlights of my discussion with Morris. Below, you can also download and listen to the entire hour-long interview I had with him. You can buy his book at Amazon or in bookstores. Tabloid is now also for sale on DVD.

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Ever since I started working on the /Filmcast, there have been two people I’ve always wanted to get onto the show that I haven’t been able to. Today, I cross one of those two names off my list (As for the other one, hopefully one day I can still get Heather Havrilesky to notice me…).

Shawn Ryan is one of the most exciting people working in the entertainment industry today. With an ear for crackling dialogue and a penchant for labyrinthine, satisfying plots, Ryan re-invigorates any genre he touches. He created the hit FX show The Shield, and was the showrunner on Lie To Me, Terriers, and The Unit. His newest show, The Chicago Code, airs on Fox on Monday nights and it’s one of my favorite new shows of 2011. In addition to watching it on TV, you can also see The Chicago Code on Hulu, Amazon, or iTunes. It’s well-worth your time to catch up now!

After the jump, read a full transcript (edited for clarity) of my 40-minute conversation with Shawn Ryan. It’s rare, in-depth look into what it’s like to create and manage a big-budget broadcast TV show and I’d urge you to give it a look. You can also download the audio from the interview through the /Filmcast.

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David chats with actor/writer/director Tom McCarthy about playing the most hated villain in The Wire, the challenges of filming high school wrestling, and making indie fare that rises above the rest. Tom’s newest film, Win Win, is out in limited release today.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us for our next live broadcast on Sunday, March 20 at Slashfilm’s live page where we’ll be discussing Paul.

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As I mentioned yesterday, I recently had the opportunity to speak with David O. Russell, who directed The Fighter, which was my favorite film of 2010. We chatted about a variety of topics, including themes of incest in his work, his musical choices, plus some of the other projects he’s worked on in the past and will be working on in the future. Thanks to everyone who submitted awesome questions for this live Q&A!

Russell seemed like an incredibly cool dude, who’s had somewhat of a rough time of it in Hollywood until recently. I wish him the best on his next projects. Below is the audio of our conversation. Hit the jump for the full transcript, which has been edited for clarity.

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One of the most audacious films to come out of Sundance this year was Chris Morris’ Four Lions. A comedic genius who hails from the UK, Morris has previously skewered the nightly newscast and the investigative documentary in the TV series The Day Today and Brass Eye, respectively. In Four Lions, Morris turns his satirical eye towards a group of would-be terrorists from Sheffield, England. While their desire for jihad is strong, they are far from the sharpest knives in the drawer. The result is a film that’s both hilarious and dark, farcical yet true-to-life.

In this episode of the /Filmcast, Dave speaks with Morris about Four Lions (his first feature film). Chris discusses why terrorists really can sometimes be hilarious, how we aren’t getting the full story from the media, his appreciation of the documentary film format, and why he chose to shoot part of his film using night vision. Four Lions is out in limited release today. Thanks to Brattle Theater and BUFF for helping me put this interview together!

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us on Sunday (11/7) at 10 PM EST / 7 PM PST at Slashfilm’s live page as we review Due Date.

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This week, Dave Chen speaks with director Danny Boyle about his newest film, 127 Hours. Dave asks Boyle about the unique style he employed for 127 Hours, what tricks he used to make the film (set in one place and primarily starring one character) dynamic, what other guy-stuck-in-one-place films inspired him, and why, of all movies, he chose to tackle this one after the stunning success of Slumdog Millionaire. 127 Hours is out in limited release on Friday, November 5th. Be sure to also check out Peter’s great video interview with Boyle.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Join us on Sunday (11/7) at 10 PM EST / 7 PM PST at Slashfilm’s live page as we review Due Date.

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Trent Reznor’s score for The Social Network (which he co-wrote with collaborator Atticus Ross) is a surprisingly perfect fit for a film about Harvard nerds who create the world’s largest online social network. With a deft combination of melancholy and grittiness, Reznor brings out the excitement of the times while infusing the proceedings with a sense of dread and foreboding. It’s one of my favorite soundtracks of the year, and I’d definitely recommend you check it out.

I had the privilege to chat with Reznor a couple days ago. In our 50-minute interview, we discuss how he first became involved in the project, his creative process for some of the tracks, and some of the challenges he faced achieving the right sound and feel for the film. We also preview some of the best tracks from the soundtrack, which is available for purchase/pre-order right now (today at Amazon for $2.99).

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