Inhumans teaser

The Inhumans are an odd bunch. While making my way over to Honolulu, Hawaii to visit the set of the latest Marvel show along with other bloggers and reporters, I enjoyed the oddities of Paul Jenkins and Jae Lee‘s take on Marvel’s Royal family midair. Perhaps it wouldn’t translate to the most accessible or financially responsible series, but the comics (and the family contained within) went to some fantastical, out-of-this-world territory. The ABC series is still set out of this world, at least partially, but is looking to ground the genetically super-powered characters. But they’re initially going big, though, by shooting the first two episodes on IMAX cameras.

Below, check out our Inhumans set visit report.

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It MPAA rating

It is the story of a shapeshifting monster that takes on the form of a clown named Pennywise so it can murder children. And yet, millions of people first encountered this tale as a television miniseries. In 1990. On ABC. To say that the beloved television adaptation was watered down from the source material would be an understatement.

For the new big screen adaptation of Stephen King‘s classic novel, director Andy Muschietti has embraced the R-rating, aiming for a version that can capture the uncomfortable darkness of the source material. During a set visit to the film’s Toronto set last year, he and producer Barbara Muschietti shared the details on why they’re embracing the rating…and focusing on practical effects whenever possible.

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The It Losers Club Interview

Some kids spend the summer playing video games. Others go to camp. But for the young cast of It, the summer of 2016 was spent battling an evil entity that takes on the form of a clown so it can prey on the children of Derry, Maine.

And just about all of them called it the best summer of their lives.

When we visited the set of director Andy Muschietti‘s adaptation of Stephen King‘s classic horror novel last year, we were able to meet the entire “Losers’ Club,” the ensemble of young misfits and dorks who come together to battle Pennywise the Dancing Clown and its various other hideous guises. As you’d expect from seven young kids working on a horror movie set, they had stories to share…and no filter to keep them from being interesting.

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it sequel

It hasn’t even hit theaters yet and director Andy Muschietti and producer Barbara Muschietti are already talking about a sequel.

But can you blame them? Their movie only adapts one-half of Stephen King‘s massive novel, which jumps between stories set in 1957 and 1984 (although the ’50s portion is now 1989 in the film). The new big screen version of It follows the story of the “Losers’ Club,” a group of kids who do battle with an ancient supernatural entity…and excludes entirely the scenes where they reunite nearly 30 years later to finish the job.

While visiting the Toronto set of It last year, the filmmakers seemed confident about taking on the sequel at some point. In fact, they shared with us a few scenes and ideas from the original novel that were axed from the first movie but will play a role in a hopeful It sequel.

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Stephen King's It Trailer - Pennywise - It Footage Reaction

Pennywise the Dancing Clown is an unlikely horror movie icon, mainly because he has yet to appear in a horror movie. Many people know him from Stephen King‘s classic horror tome It. Many more know him from the 1990 TV miniseries adaptation, where he was played so memorably by the great Tim Curry. So, how does a 2017 big screen version of It take on a character so familiar (and so frightening) to so many people? Simple: you reinvent him/it from the ground up.

With this new version of It, director Andy Muschietti and actor Bill Skarsgård deliberately set out to create a version of Pennywise that feels nothing like Curry’s performance. In many ways, it looks nothing like the version described in King’s work, either. This Pennywise (actually the favorite form of an ancient, shape-shifting monster that preys on children) looks to reinvent the “scary clown” for a new generation of moviegoers.

When I visited the Toronto set of It last year, I saw firsthand just how different this Pennywise will be…and courtesy of the filmmakers and Skarsgård, learned just how this unique take came into being in the first place.

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Baby Driver BTS - Edgar Wright and Ansel Elgort

Edgar Wright has the kind of track record any director would envy. His Cornetto trilogy is well loved by fans and critics alike, and at least two-thirds of it has attained “instant classic” status. When he ventured outside his usual wheelhouse with Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, the result was a dizzying video game-inspired fantasia that felt like nothing we’d seen before or since.

And by all accounts, he’s knocked it out of the park again with Baby Driver, which pushes him into still more new territory. This one, you see, is a high-speed heist film that also happens to be a musical. Kinda. Sorta. It’s complicated. We’ll let him explain.

Last year, we got to chat with Wright on the Atlanta set of Baby Driver, and you can read our full conversation below. In it, Wright discusses his influences, the film’s long journey to the screen, the Atlanta setting, and more.

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Baby Driver - Baby (Ansel Elgort) in mirror

Baby Driver took SXSW by storm this past March, earning such high praise (it’s currently sitting at a perfect 100% on Rotten Tomatoes, with 22 reviews in) that distributor Sony was inspired to bump its release up from a sleepy August weekend to a prime June spot.

But we didn’t know any of that was going to happen in April 2016, when the studio invited us to visit the film’s Atlanta set. All we knew at that time was that Baby Driver was the new Edgar Wright movie – and considering his track record, that in itself felt like reason enough to get excited. And what we learned on set rocketed the film to the top of our most-anticipated list.

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jon watts behind the scenes of Spider-man: Homecoming

When filmmaker Jon Watts premiered his independent film Cop Car at the Sundance Film Festival, there is no way he could have anticipated that it would lead to him directing Spider-Man’s return to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But after talking to the Spider-Man: Homecoming director on the set of Peter Parker’s first MCU solo film, it is easy to see why he got the job.

During our on-set chat, Watts explained his vision for this new Spider-Man reboot, how it will be different than Marc Webb and Sam Raimi’s films, how Captain America: Civil War changed this film, the importance to diversify Peter Parker’s world, making the villain a real person, the rumors surrounding Zendaya and much more.

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Amy Pascal Spider-Man: Homecoming Interview

Amy Pascal is one of the most powerful women in Hollywood. The former head of Sony Pictures was instrumental in making the deal that returned Peter Parker to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. When I was on the set of Spider-Man: Homecoming, it seemed clear that her producer credit was not just a title – she was on set behind the monitor, playing a very active role in the creative decisions of the reboot.

But I was most surprised at how down-to-earth Pascal seemed, how honest some of her answers were and how self-deprecating she was about the previous Spider-Man installments (made under her leadership) that weren’t considered home runs. She realizes that this current situation, where Sony and Disney get to “share” Spidey, rarely ever happens in Hollywood, and seems very grateful to have been part of orchestrating it.

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Tom Holland Spider-Man: Homecoming interview

When we sat down with Tom Holland on the set of Spider-Man: Homecoming, it had only been three months since the world saw him as Spider-Man in Captain America: Civil War. However, he was clearly already very comfortable in the role of Peter Parker.

Holland talked about the extensive audition process that got him the part, the evolution of Homecoming‘s script, how he went undercover at a high school in the Bronx to prepare for the movie, and how director Jon Watts put him and his co-stars through a coming of age film festival before shooting. The actor also spoke about Parker’s relationships with Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr), Aunt May (Marisa Tomei), and the Vulture (Michael Keaton), the differences between this film and the previous Spider-man movies, his favorite new Spider-Man gadget, if Peter Parker will dance in this movie, and much much more.

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