avengers infinity war reviews

Thanos is here, and death is coming with him. (Not the character of Death, just plain old regular death.) Avengers: Infinity War, Marvel Studios’ newest star-studded cinematic team-up, has screened for critics before its official release later this week, and the reviews are in. As I write this, the movie sits at 87% on Rotten Tomatoes, and a majority of the reviews approach the film with a healthy mixture of skepticism and awe. That seems appropriate for a film that is simultaneously the latest piece of corporate synergy and also the biggest entry in longform studio storytelling on a scale we’ve never seen before.

Read on to hear what critics – including us – have to say about the next entry in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Read More »

Disobedience review

It’s easy to remember Rachel McAdams’ most iconic performance, Regina George in Mean Girls, as little more than the ruthlessly hilarious one-liners and cutting GIF-worthy glances on the surface. But there’s so much more bubbling underneath in her performance that makes it iconic. McAdams is a master of presenting a confident, assured front while meaning or feeling something entirely different. The gulf between what she says and what she wants gets played for laughs in Mean Girls, but in her latest film, Sebastian Lelio’s Disobedience, it’s played for tension and tragedy.

Read More »

Infinity War Runtime

The best thing about Avengers: Infinity War is, in many ways, the best thing about the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a whole: an incredibly charming and almost overqualified ensemble cast. Though a few of the actors in the nearly 20 films of the MCU haven’t worked out so well, many of the performers are key to making the heroes of this fantastical series fresh and exciting. Whenever the sometimes-unwieldy, epic-length Infinity War works, it’s largely thanks to the actors, not the action sequences or the effects or anything else. The cast makes this movie, not the other way around.

Read More »

back roads review

Alex Pettyfer, probably best known to audiences as “The Kid” in Magic Mike, always aspired to be more than just a thirst trap. In many ways, he might be too handsome for his own good. Pettyfer has been on the cusp of “happening” for a decade since landing the lead role in the Alex Rider series, a YA James Bond that came too close to Harry Potter and too far from Twilight and The Hunger Games. Following years of being sold as little more than a slab of meat to lust after, it’s been an uphill battle for the actor to convince audiences that he has more to offer. With Back Roads, his first go-round in the director’s chair, Pettyfer takes his future into his own hands.

Read More »

duck butter review

Duck Butter is not a film about a whirlwind lesbian romance — rather, it’s a slow-moving train crash about a relationship that appears doomed from the start. But it’s one that you can’t look away from.

Alia Shawkat stars in and co-writes the Miguel Arteta-directed dramedy about two women who embark on a 24-hour experiment that puts the fast-forward button on their relationship. But the experiment — which involves them having sex every hour — takes a dramatic turn as emotions and unresolved issues come to a head. Duck Butter is a slow-burning drama whose every story movement is deliberate, every long silence is dense with meaning, and every emotion feels explosive. But there’s an unease to watching the film and knowing the inevitable outcome of this romantic experiment: the penny will drop, the love will fail, and the shit will (literally) come out.

Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

stockholm review

Stockholm syndrome has inherently horrifying roots: Victims of kidnappings, hostage situations, and other dangerous situations somehow develop feelings of sympathy, maybe even affection, for their captors. But that doesn’t mean that a feature film adaptation of the 1973 bank robbery that originated the term can’t be outright hilarious.

Stockholm, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 19, feels like such an irreverent black comedy that you wouldn’t expect it to be based on real-life events. But its stranger-than-fiction premise only serves to heighten everything — the emotions, the absurdity, and the sympathy for its central robber played with a zany, unhinged verve by the scene-stealing Ethan Hawke.

Read More »

Cargo Review

Netflix’s “zom-dram” Cargo – what’s essentially an Australian The Walking Dead spinoff – boasts far more inspiration from survival instincts over typical rotter squashing. No tactical military platoons, just a father and child fighting against outbreak paranoia. Supplies are scarce, native tribes echo ritualistic thinking and do I detect a hint of anti-fracking commentary? Man’s mutilation of Mother Nature pits industrial complexes against respect for cavernous and magnificent brushlands in this greed-poisoned flatlands march. An environmentally sound subgenre take that’s powered by 2018’s strongest horror theme: parental fears and intergenerational unrest.

Read More »

mary shelley review

There’s an imaginative, hugely entertaining movie to be made out of that fated rainy summer day in Geneva that spawned some of the most pivotal horror novels in history. Mary Shelley is not that movie.

Read More »

i feel pretty reviews

I Feel Pretty sparked all kinds of controversy when its trailer first debuted, with critics accusing the comedy of fat-shaming. But star Amy Schumer refuted the backlash. Wait until you see the movie, she insisted, promising that I Feel Pretty was actually an empowering movie about self-confidence.

Well, critics have seen the movie. And a lot of them have the same opinions as they did when the trailer first arrived.

Read More »

the devil and father amorth review

It’s been nearly 45 years since director William Friedkin first terrified audiences with The Exorcist, and now the filmmaker is ready to return to the taboo religious practice with the documentary The Devil and Father Amorth.

The concept is too irresistible to pass up: here’s the director of The Exorcist making a documentary about a real exorcism. It practically markets itself. Friedkin, for his part, heavily leans in to the idea, devoting the first 10 to 15 minutes of The Devil and Father Amorth with a brief recap of how he came to make The Exorcist. From this intro, the thrust of the film becomes clear: the title may be The Devil and Father Amorth, but it’s William Friedkin who is front and center.

Read More »