jurassic world director

J.A. Bayona makes his Jurassic debut with Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, but there was a time when the filmmaker could’ve entered the franchise a lot sooner. During our Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom set visit, producers Frank Marshall and Pat Crowley revealed that Bayona was the original choice for Jurassic World director before Colin Trevorrow got the job.

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In June 2017, I traveled to Honolulu, Hawaii to visit the set of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. This week, we will be running a ton of coverage from this visit, beginning with our interview with producers Frank Marshall and Pat Crowley.

The interview is packed with information on the making of the film, but as always, they were being very guarded about spoilers, so don’t worry – reading this will not spoil anything that hasn’t already been glimpsed in the trailers. This roundtable interview was conducted alongside Eric Vespe from Rooster Teeth.

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duck butter review

Duck Butter is not a film about a whirlwind lesbian romance — rather, it’s a slow-moving train crash about a relationship that appears doomed from the start. But it’s one that you can’t look away from.

Alia Shawkat stars in and co-writes the Miguel Arteta-directed dramedy about two women who embark on a 24-hour experiment that puts the fast-forward button on their relationship. But the experiment — which involves them having sex every hour — takes a dramatic turn as emotions and unresolved issues come to a head. Duck Butter is a slow-burning drama whose every story movement is deliberate, every long silence is dense with meaning, and every emotion feels explosive. But there’s an unease to watching the film and knowing the inevitable outcome of this romantic experiment: the penny will drop, the love will fail, and the shit will (literally) come out.

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spider-man homecoming revisited

(Welcome to Road to Infinity War, a new series where we revisit the first 18 movies of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and ask “How did we get here?” In this edition: Spider-Man: Homecoming offers a peek at the margins of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.)

The “Homecoming” sub-title has a sly double meaning in North America, but both the phrase and its many localizations – usually some variant of “Returning Home” – sent a singular message to most of the world. This was Spider-Man back where he belonged, at the House of Ideas, right alongside characters he’d shared the page with for over 50 years. In order to re-establish him though, Marvel needed to answer a key question following his appearance in Captain America: Civil War: Where does Spider-Man fit in a world of Avengers?

The Marvel Cinematic Universe had been around for nearly 10 years by the time we got Spider-Man: Homecoming. This fictional world began shortly after Tobey Maguire vacated the spider-suit, and it continued through Andrew Garfield fizzling out. Tom Holland was to be the third on-screen Spider-Man in under a decade, and separating him from the other two became imperative. In both prior incarnations, Spider-Man was the only hero around and he had to rise to the occasion no matter how big the threat. Holland’s Peter Parker however – younger, smaller, and of meeker demeanor – exists in a world much like our own: a world where a kid his age had grown up watching Avengers rule the skies, as the little guys looked up in awe.

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den of thieves alternate ending

Grab your tactical vest and crime scene donuts: Den of Thieves hits home video this week. We have a chance for you to win the film on Blu-ray, if you’re lucky. Plus: watch an exclusive clip revealing a Den of Thieves alternate ending below.

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Westworld Journey Into Night Review

Welcome to our weekly recaps of HBO’s Westworld. This Westworld review takes a look at the first episode of season 2, “Journey Into Night.” Be warned: spoilers follow.

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The Dark Crystal Prop Replicas

The Dark Crystal celebrated its 35th anniversary at the end of 2017, drumming up even more interest in the Jim Henson production that first hit the big screen, and many collectible houses are still celebrating.

For those of you who don’t know, the fantasy film follows a young man who goes on a quest to find a shard of the dark crystal, a powerful gem that once provided balance to the universe. It’s the key to bringing peace back to the world after it was taken over by the evil Skeksis. Now ans of the fantasy adventure can now have a piece of The Dark Crystal themselves.

No, we’re not talking about the titular crystal itself (not exactly anyway), but instead you can get your hands on two prop replicas: the emperor’s scepter and the Castle of the Skeksis. Check out both of The Dark Crystal prop replicas from Chronicle Collectibles below. Read More »

Rampage Scene Breakdown

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, director Brad Peyton breaks down a scene from the video game blockbuster Rampage. Plus, examine whether some blockbuster movies can hyped to the point that they can’t be anything but disappointing, and watch a Harry Potter inspired gymnastics routine by an Olympic athlete. Read More »

Josh Brolin Batman

In the wake of Man of Steel, director Zack Snyder was meeting with all sorts of actors to potentially play the role of The Dark Knight in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Before Ben Affleck secured the part, one of the frontrunners for the role was Josh Brolin (Avengers: Infinity War), and in a new interview, Brolin sounds extremely relieved that he wasn’t the one who ended up donning the cape and cowl. Read the latest Josh Brolin Batman quotes below, and find out who he originally wanted to direct the 2010 comic book western Jonah Hex. Read More »

stockholm review

Stockholm syndrome has inherently horrifying roots: Victims of kidnappings, hostage situations, and other dangerous situations somehow develop feelings of sympathy, maybe even affection, for their captors. But that doesn’t mean that a feature film adaptation of the 1973 bank robbery that originated the term can’t be outright hilarious.

Stockholm, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 19, feels like such an irreverent black comedy that you wouldn’t expect it to be based on real-life events. But its stranger-than-fiction premise only serves to heighten everything — the emotions, the absurdity, and the sympathy for its central robber played with a zany, unhinged verve by the scene-stealing Ethan Hawke.

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