How to Talk to Girls at Parties

Neil Gaiman‘s comic book How to Talk to Girl at Parties is a fun read. It’s also a very short read. If adapted faithfully, it’d probably be a great short film. The director behind Rabbit Hole and Hedwig and the Angry Inch, John Cameron Mitchell, had the freedom of adapting the story into a narrative feature film. He got to take the kernel of a story where he wanted to, and where he went with it looks like a blast.

Below, watch the How to Talk to Girls at Parties teasers.

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Good Time trailer

Over the last five years, Robert Pattinson has been doing some great projects. From his work with filmmakers like David Cronenberg, David Michôd (The Rover), and Anton Corbijn (Life) to his most his recent film, The Lost City City of Z, Pattinson has been delivering quality performances in some high-quality movies. He has continued to show more and more range lately. Hopefully, we’ll say the same of his work in Josh and Benny Safdie‘s Good Time, which debuts this month at the Cannes Film Festival.

Below, watch the Good Time trailer.

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the disaster artist release date

James Franco‘s The Disaster Artist has gone from New Line to A24. While New Line still holds the international rights, the distributor behind last year’s Best Picture winner, Moonlight, will handle the domestic release of Franco’s look at the making of Tommy Wiseau‘s The Room. A24 has set a December release date for the film.

Below, find out more about the Disaster Artist release date.

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woodshock trailer

There few film distributors who engender loyalty quite like A24, a company whose track record has been so consistent and so downright fascinating that we were compelled to rank every single movie they’ve released. Their ever-expanding filmography looks to continue with Woodshock, which certainly looks like it’ll slide right into their library. An unsettling little movie, with fresh talent behind the camera, starring a performer who has proven herself time and time again to be worth watching? Yeah, that’s the exact kind of movie we’ve come to expect from A24 at this point.

The Woodshock trailer is light on plot but heavy on stunning visuals…and on Kirsten Dunst, who has quietly re-emerged as one of the most exciting actresses working at the moment.

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a24 movies ranked

General audiences don’t pay much attention to the distributors of most films (unless the distributor happens to be Disney). But most film distributors aren’t A24 Films, the little start-up distribution company that could. Founded in 2012 by Daniel Katz, David Fenkel, and John Hodges, A24 is one of the rare independent film distributors to build up the type of rabid fanbase usually reserved for Disney-owned Marvel movies. And with good reason: since 2013, A24 has been releasing unique independent cinema worth talking about. “A24 films run the gamut of genre and style, but they all seem to be incredibly specific, personal visions,” said James Ponsoldt, who directed two films released by A24. When you’re in a theater and the lights go down, and the cool, retro, minimalistic A24 logo comes up, you know you’re about to get something special. And they show no signs of slowing down. On May 5, they’ll release Azazel JacobsThe Lovers, with films like A Ghost Story, The Exception and It Comes At Night all on the horizon and already generating buzz.

Ranking films is a time-honored tradition here on the internet. But most ranking tends to be of the Marvel or DCEU variety. Why should superhero movies have all the fun? Let’s give an indie distributor a shot! You might ask: is it fair to rank different films from different directors just because they all fall under the same distributor? Probably not! But we’re going to do it anyway. It’s worth noting that, with a few exceptions, the films in A24’s line-up are either good, very good or downright excellent. That’s worth celebrating and applauding. That said, join us as we rank the films of A24.

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it comes at night review

[It Comes At Night premiered as a secret screening at the Overlook Film Festival this weekend. The film came right from the edit bay, and while it’s not final, (they’re still working on a few effects, and it contained no credits) the picture is locked.]

It Comes At Night is either a survivalist’s greatest dream or biggest nightmare. It touches on something that many people have hidden away in the dark recesses of their minds, a plan for when civilization collapses and you have to fend for yourself. It usually involves a secluded location deep in the woods, and with more than a couple of guns.

That’s the case for young Travis (Kelvin Harrison, Jr.), who lives in a secured and heavily armed home with his parents (Joel Edgerton and Carmen Ejogo.) Society might be gone for all they know, because they’ve been living far out in the woods for quite a while, surviving day-to-day.

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The Exception Jai Courtney

Maybe if I’d seen the Starz show Spartacus: War of the Damned, I’d be on board the Jai Courtney train. But aside from a halfway decent performance in the first Jack Reacher movie and the weirdness of his Captain Boomerang in Suicide Squad, I haven’t seen much from the guy that warrants his level of stardom.

But maybe he’s better in smaller films than blockbusters. Let’s test that theory by taking a look at the trailer for a new World War II thriller called The Exception, which stars Courtney as a Nazi soldier who falls in love with a Jewish girl played by Baby Driver’s Lily James. Watch The Exception trailer below.
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Brie Larson interview

There’s more than meets the eye with some of the characters in Free Fire. They can reveal shades of humanity you wouldn’t immediately expect at the start of Ben Wheatley‘s action-comedy. Some characters, on the other hand, like Vernon (Sharlto Copley), can be chalked up to “what you see is what you get.”

That’s not the case with Justine, played by Academy Award winner Brie Larson (Room), who is calmer than most during Wheatley’s 85-minute shootout. Justine tries to keep others from losing their heads as hers remains firmly planted on her shoulders.

Wheatley’s movie is contained and set mostly in one location, but it still leaves you with a sense of who the characters are outside of the abandoned warehouse. We recently sat down with Larson and discussed what sort of person Justine is outside of the film, what it’s like shooting in chronological order, and more. Spoilers for the film lie ahead.

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Brigsby Bear pic

The summer movie season is almost upon us. Comic book movies, reboots, spin-offs, and an unwanted sequel or two – they’re all coming out these next four months. We’re looking forward to more than a few of them, but I’m more hopeful for some of the movies coming to on-demand, steaming services, and local arthouse theaters this summer. Last week, we brought you the list of our most anticipated wide releases arriving this summer. And now, here’s the companion pieces: the 15 limited releases we’re most excited to see!

A few of the titles listed in our indie-themed 2017 summer movie preview below, including Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled, are set to go wide after a small launch. However, keep your eyes open – most of these movies may require you to actively seek them out…and a fair number of them will surely prove worth the effort!

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Ben Wheatley interview

The distinction between heroes and villains isn’t as clear in Free Fire as most action movies. And it’s partly because co-writer/director Ben Wheatley and co-writer Amy Jump give all their characters lives outside of the shootout – lives you want to see them find a way to escape back to. Out of the ensemble, some eggs are more rotten than others, but for the most part, Free Fire is a movie in which we’re rooting the characters to find a solution, not kill each other.

Over the span of 85 minutes – a glorious runtime in this day and age – not one of the characters rings as false in Free Fire. Their pain feels real because they feel real. Jump and Wheatley rarely give these characters any breaks, either. The writers bring a heavy dose of physical comedy to the film to go along with some brutal carnage.

We recently sat down with Wheatley, the director behind Kill List and High-Rise, for a brief conversation about his new movie.

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