The Pool review

The Pool is a pro-life crocodile attack flick set in a drained Olympic-sized swimming pool that is incredibly mean-spirited towards its main character, improbably audacious…and sponsored by Pizza Hut? Ping Lumpraploeng’s Thai creature feature is cheesily melodramatic and has it out for the few characters on screen with such meanness, which ensures a cackle-worthy “WTF” brand of riotous watching experience. Cultural nuances shape a comically overdramatic “monster” movie of questionable circumstances, always sold with the proper level of head-scratching entertainment. It’s “a lot” in all the weirdest, most unexpected ways.

Oh, also, any dog and animal lovers should be warned: The Pool will tear your heart out, stomp it into mush, and stuff the gunk back down your throat. Read More »

Fantastic Fest Day Three Recap

(Welcome to The Fantastic Fest Diaries, where we will be chronicling every single movie we see at the United States’ largest genre film festival.)

Welcome to Fantastic Fest 2019, day two. In this entry, The Long Walk is a fascinating story that goes on for too long, The Lodge will make you miserable in the best ways possible, The Pool defies logic and taste in ways that are difficult to sum up, and The Mortuary Collection is a fun but hit-and-miss horror anthology.

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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 30 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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Bill Murray recently offered the following skepticism at a press junket, “I saw a guy talking about the end of the world a couple of years ago, and I haven’t seen that either.” Many notable critics feel that the new documentary entitled Collapse, from the well-regarded director behind American Movie and The Yes Men, more or less informs the world, Murray included, that the end in the form of total economic collapse is once again near. “No, this time it is. Really.” Based on surface impressions, Collapse‘s message sounds not unlike Michael Moore’s recent Capitalism: A Love Story, which is a turn off, considering that it’s rather obvious things are currently effed in America (the job market, health care, pundit-hungry media, two aimless “wars,” startling deficit, for starters). One need not prescribe to “doomist” theorizing in order to wave a frightened fist online, though multi-thousands do on a daily basis. But what separates Collapse from Capitalism is the man professing the nation’s and world’s anxiety-addled, certain doom: Michael Ruppert.

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