Two of the 20th century’s greatest films are bound together by the same historical tragedy. When it arrived in theaters in mid-December 1993 — just six months after his summer blockbuster, Jurassic Park — critics and audiences alike embraced Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List as a masterpiece. More than just an awards season drama, the film provided what’s been called a “first foundational encounter with the Holocaust” for a whole generation of viewers. It soon emerged as the crowning achievement in Spielberg’s career, earning him his first Best Director Oscar and his only Best Picture Oscar. In 1998, a mere half-decade after its release, Schindler’s List placed in the top ten on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 greatest American movies of all time.

The movie had its detractors, however. Not everyone was enamored of Spielberg’s dramatic approach to the weighty, real-life subject matter. One of the most vocal critics was Claude Lanzmann, a French filmmaker known for his own landmark Holocaust documentary, Shoah. Released in 1985, Shoah helped inspire the pseudo-documentary look of Schindler’s List. In 2012, it was this film, not Spielberg’s, that showed up in the results of the British Film Institute’s once-a-decade poll of the 50 greatest films of all time. Yet when Shoah was commemorating its own 25th anniversary back in 2010, Lanzmann lamented to The New York Times that his film had “disappeared from the American scene.”

Earlier this year, Lanzmann passed away, and now all eyes are on Schindler’s List again as we recognize the quarter century that has passed since its release. Recent world events have made both of these films more relevant than ever, and rather than be at odds, Schindler’s List and Shoah stand as necessary companion pieces in the preservation of Holocaust awareness.

Read More »

Schindler's List Steven Spielberg Interview

This year marks the 25th anniversary of Schindler’s List, and the film is back in select theaters for a limited time starting today. It’s a milestone motion picture, earning Steven Spielberg his first Oscar for Best Director, not to mention taking home Best Picture.

But more importantly, it’s probably the most harrowing and acclaimed depiction of the Holocaust that the big screen has ever seen. Schindler’s List inspired survivors to tell their stories, and it also inspired Spielberg to start the Shoah Foundation, an organization that exists to further the remembrance of the Holocaust to ensure that what happened all those years ago during never happens again.

In a new interview with Lester Holt on NBC Nightly News, Spielberg sat down for an extensive 22-minute segment about Schindler’s List, looking back at the making of the movie, the legacy it has created for victims and survivors, and the people who have been touched by the film over the past two and a half decades. Read More »

Schindler's List returning to theaters

One of Steven Spielberg‘s most powerful films is returning to theaters for its 25th anniversary. Schindler’s List will play a limited engagement in theaters across the U.S. and Canada starting December 7, 2018 with picture and sound digitally remastered.

Read More »

Spielberg Documentary

Steven Spielberg is one of our greatest living filmmakers. While some may want to write the Jaws filmmaker off as nothing more than a purveyor of popular blockbusters, very few directors understand the language of cinema as well as Spielberg. While many filmmakers can’t block a shot to save their lie, Spielberg can convey an entire story wordlessly with his imagery. He’s one of the medium’s true masters.

Susan Lacy‘s new HBO documentary Spielberg takes a look at the successful filmmakers vast career, and we picked out 10 revealing facts from the Spielberg documentary that you should know. And then you should watch the doc for yourself, of course.

Read More »

/Answers: The Greatest War Movie Scenes

Dunkirk Trailer

Every week in /Answers, we attempt to answer a new pop culture-related question. Tying in with the release of Dunkirk, this week’s edition asks “What is the greatest war-related scene in a movie?” As always, we have submissions from the /Film writing crew and podcast team.

Read More »

Gremlins

Now that the weather is getting nicer, you might not want to sit at home on the couch to watch stuff on Netflix, but the streaming service is going to do their best to keep you there with their new line-up of shows and movies getting added to their library in April.

As usual, there are a bunch of Netflix originals, including some movies that debuted at the SXSW Film Festival, new episodes of Mystery Science Theater 3000, a new comedy special from Louis C.K., a new season of The Get Down and more. But there are also plenty of licensed titles ranging from a Disney sports classic to a Best Picture winner.

Get our personal recommendations and the full list of TV shows and movies coming to Netflix in April 2017 below.

Read More »

best directed movies

The Directors Guild of America is celebrating its 80th anniversary this year and it has decided to commemorate this event in a manner most befitting of the internet age: by making a list. More specifically, by polling DGA members and assembling a list of the 80 best-directed movies made since 1936, when the guild was founded. That’s one movie per year.

And like all internet lists, it’s bound to inspire conversation, eye-rolling, yelling, and maybe even a little cheer or two.

Read More »

Black and White movies supercut

Ever since motion pictures began adopting Technicolor, the once-traditional use of black and white photography eventually went out the window. After all, an overwhelming majority of the population sees the world in full color, so why wouldn’t they want to see movies in the same way?

But while most of our movies are presented in color today, whether it’s tinted, saturated, toned, there are still plenty of respectable and mesmerizing movies from past and present that look positively stunning in black and white. From Stanley Kubrick’s Killer’s Kiss in 1955 to Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List in 1993 to last year’s A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, there’s some amazing black and white imagery here.

Watch the black and white movies supercut after the jump! Read More »

Steven Spielberg had been nominated for the Best Director Oscar four times before winning in 1994. The film that did the trick, Schindler’s List, won 7 Oscars total, including Best Picture, and was the ultimate redemption for the director who went out on a limb to tell this story. He shot it in black and white and released it in a three-hour cut. In doing so he moved away from the fantastic films that had made him famous. Ultimately, Spielberg’s passion for this incredible and uplifting story offset the risk. Schindler’s List cemented him as one of our most important filmmakers, and in doing so became one of the most revered films of the twenty years since its release.

Yes, 2013 marks the 20th anniversary of Schindler’s List. To celebrate, on March 5 Universal will finally release the masterpiece on Blu-ray. Read the press release and see the box art below. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

slashfilmcast550

The /Filmcast: After Dark is a recording of what happens right after The /Filmcast is over, when the kids have gone to bed and the guys feel free to speak whatever is on their minds. In other words, it’s the leftover and disorganized ramblings, mindfarts, and brain diarrhea from The /Filmcast, all in one convenient audio file. In this episode, David ChenDevindra Hardawar, and Adam Quigley chat with Keith Phipps about the making of Schindler’s List, try to make sense of a question about re-purposing music, and discuss what it means to be a Nielsen family.

You can always e-mail us at slashfilmcast(AT)gmail(DOT)com, or call and leave a voicemail at 781-583-1993. Tune in to Slashfilm’s live page on Sunday (12/4) at 10 PM EST / 7 PM PST to hear us discuss Hugo.

Download or Play Now in your Browser:

[audio:http://traffic.libsyn.com/slashfilmcast/Afterdarkep167.mp3]

Subscribe to the /Filmcast: