Clint Mansell interview

For more than twenty years, Clint Mansell has created beautiful and artistically daring scores for a wide variety of films. His work on Darren Aronofsky’s Requiem for a Dream remains one of the most haunting scores of this millennium, and his other credits – from Moon to Stoker to The Fountain and Black Swan – represent a depth and sophistication that’s rare in an era in which many scores are little more than background noise.

Mansell previously collaborated with director Ben Wheatley on High-Rise, and now he’s re-teamed with the filmmaker for Rebecca, a new adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s gothic romance novel. His score is one of the best parts of the entire film: it captures the unease of Lily James’ main character and builds a moody, occasionally eerie foundation for the mysteries of the story. We spoke with Mansell about creating new music in the shadow of Alfred Hitchcock’s Best Picture-winning 1940 adaptation, using “the devil’s instrument” as part of the score, how he infuses music with emotion, and more.

We’re also happy to premiere a full track from Mansell’s Rebecca score, so immerse yourself in a spooky atmosphere while reading the interview by pressing play below. Read More »

rebecca review

It’s never a good idea to remake Hitchcock, even though several have tried. And while Ben Wheatley‘s new Netflix Rebecca is technically not a remake, but rather a new adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s classic novel, it can’t escape the Hitchock film’s legacy. Like its main character, Rebecca is living in the shadow of its predecessor. To Wheatley’s credit, he doesn’t try to ape Hitchcock in any way, shape, or form. But, oddly enough, he doesn’t bring much new life to the proceedings, either. For a film filled with such lush production design, Rebecca is a curiously stifled affair.

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Rebecca Posters

This fall, Netflix is releasing Rebecca, a bold attempt at following Alfred Hitchcock’s classic film from 1940, based on the 1938 novel of the same name by Daphne du Maurier. But if there’s anyone who can do it, it’s director Ben Wheatley, and his new take on the old story also has the benefit of starring Armie Hammer and Lily James. Both are prominently featured on some colorful, fractured and double exposed posters, and they all have Kristin Scott Thomas as the titular character looming in the background. Read More »

rebecca trailer

How do you follow up Alfred Hitchcock? The 1941 Rebecca was famously the only film Hitchcock directed that nabbed a Best Picture win at the Oscars, and remains to this day a beloved adaptation of the Daphne du Maurier Gothic classic. But can Ben Wheatley‘s new version hold a candle to Hitchcock’s film, or even du Maurier’s haunting novel? We’ll have to see once it hits Netflix this October. Watch the Rebecca trailer below.

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netflix rebecca

It’s always a risky idea to remake an Alfred Hitchcock movie, but when it comes to Ben Wheatley‘s Rebecca, we have nothing to worry about. According to Wheatley himself, this is definitely not a remake of the 1940 Hitchcock film. Instead, Wheatley is turning towards the original source material – the novel by Daphne du Maurier.

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Lily James Armie Hammer

Ben Wheatley, the director of films like Free Fire, High-Rise, and Kill List, is going Gothic for his next film. He’s tackling an adaptation of Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier’s classic novel about a young woman who gets married to a rich widower and slowly learns that his late wife’s memory casts a long shadow over everyone who lives at their sprawling manor. Lily James and Armie Hammer star in the new Netflix film, which finally has a release date and a batch of first-look photos that you can check out below. Read More »

(Welcome to Knives In, a series about the movies to watch before Rian Johnson’s Knives Out arrives in theaters.)

Put on your murder-solving hat, because /Film has given me jurisdiction to dive deep into one film a day in preparation for the release of Rian Johnson’s Knives Out, which hits theaters next week. Each film relates to Johnson’s “whodunit” in its own unique way, and each picture should hopefully be viewed prior to patrons watching the new movie on the big screen.

Today, we’ll be discussing the 1940 film Rebecca, and how the movie is a perfect companion piece to Johnson’s modern day murder mystery.

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national film registry

The Library of Congress has announced its 25 new inductees to the National Film Registry, the archive that protects and preserves “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant films” to American film history. As of 2018, there are 727 films in the registry — a surprisingly small amount considering cinema’s rich and long history.

This year’s annual selection of inductees has an even mixture of blockbusters, documentaries, silent movies, animation and independent films that span 107 years, from 1898 to 2005. These films include Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park, Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain, and more.

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Rebecca Netflix

“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.” That’s the iconic opening line of Daphne du Maurier‘s 1938 novel Rebecca, a gothic thriller which largely takes place in an English estate called Manderley. The book has been adapted several times over the years (Orson Welles once starred in a radio version), but its most famous adaptation is the 1940 movie that stands as the only film Alfred Hitchcock directed which won Best Picture at the Oscars.

Hollywood has been trying to get another version made for years, and now director Ben Wheatley (High-Rise, Free Fire) is the latest to take on the challenge. Learn more about the Rebecca Netflix adaptation below. Read More »

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A Guide to Cinema’s 10 Greatest Spooky Romances

addams family

When people are looking for movies to watch during the Halloween season, their eyes are often turned to the Horror genre. But what about the other emotional aspects of what many (including yours truly) considers “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year”? And more importantly, what about…love?

That’s right, All Hallow’s Eve can be quite the time for some romance to be in the air! From doomed couples to those who found love because of their quirks and oddities, this holiday of monsters and ghouls can be a great time to explore some of cinema’s greatest (and spookiest) romances.

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