rose tico tv show

When Kelly Marie Tran made her debut in Star Wars: The Last Jedi as the lowly Resistance mechanic Rose Tico, she represented several things rarely seen in a Star Wars film: she was the first woman of color to play a lead in a Star Wars movie and she was the first character in the main feature film franchise to give a voice to the countless victims of the war raging throughout the galaxy far, far away. In a sci-fi franchise about princesses and smugglers and chosen heroes, Rose Tico was the normal civilian who rose to be a hero and articulated the overall message of The Last Jedi: “That’s how we’re gonna win. Not fighting what we hate. Saving what we love.”

But in Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, Rose was all but missing from action. Barely acknowledged by Finn, her presumable love interest with whom she had just gone on a planet-hopping journey, and reduced to looking at starship plans for two hours, she was badly sidelined in the movie (apparently due to technical troubles). But Crazy Rich Asians director Jon M. Chu has a solution: a Rose Tico TV show on Disney+. And he is offering to direct it.

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permanent record movie

After a Crazy Rich breakout, Jon M. Chu is reaching new heights of being in demand. The In the Heights and Crazy Rich Asians director is eying his next project, a YA romance based on H.K. Choi’s bestselling novel, Permanent Record. Chu is currently in talks to produce and direct the Permanent Record movie for Warner Bros., his third film after two high-profile collaborations with the studio.

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in the heights trailer

We all know who Lin-Manuel Miranda is: the guy from Mary Poppins Returns! Oh, he also wrote Hamilton, a billion-dollar Broadway sensation that’s become a cultural touchstone. But before there was Hamilton there was In the Heights, Miranda’s other award-winning musical. And now it’s headed to the big screen. Crazy Rich Asians director Jon M. Chu helms the film, which is set over the course of three sweltering summer days in Washington Heights in New York City. Watch the In the Heights trailer below.

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point horror anthology series

Point Horror, a series of young adult horror books penned by authors like R.L. Stine and Christopher Pike, is headed to the small screen. HBO Max is developing a Point Horror anthology series. Each episode of the show will be inspired by one of the original books, complete with a “nostalgic nod to the 1990s” – the era in which the books originated.  Read More »

crazy rich asians sequel writer pay

The immense critical and commercial success of Crazy Rich Asians last summer was a watershed moment for Asian representation in a major Hollywood movie. But behind the scenes, things haven’t been quite so rosy. We became aware of Crazy Rich Asians‘ crazy rich problems last week when writer Adele Lim exited the sequel over a huge pay disparity between Warner Bros.’ starting offers to her and co-writer Peter Chiarelli.

The controversy didn’t look good for the project which, for all its talk of representation on the screen, apparently wasn’t keeping up with representation behind the screen. Now Crazy Rich Asians director Jon M. Chu, who is returning to direct the sequel, is weighing in on the Crazy Rich Asians writer pay disparity dispute.

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crazy rich asians sequels

Fans of the cultural phenomenon Crazy Rich Asians will soon be flush with sequels. We already knew that a Crazy Rich Asians sequel, based on author Kevin Kwan‘s follow-up novel China Rich Girlfriend, was in the works, but producers Nina Jacobson and Brad Simpson have revealed that two Crazy Rich Asians sequels will be filmed back-to-back, likely in 2020.

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crazy rich asians mahjong

Myron Kerstein wants audiences to know that romantic-comedies are back. The editor of Crazy Rich Asians is no stranger to the genre, having cut together rom-com staples like Garden State and Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, but in the aftermath of Crazy Rich Asians, it feels more important than ever for Kerstein to reiterate that.

Kerstein sat down with /Film to talk about the outrageous success and cultural impact of the first major Hollywood film led by an all-Asian cast in 25 years. Aside from being a watershed moment for Asian-Americans, Kerstein sees Crazy Rich Asians as an opportunity for Hollywood to turn a new leaf for not just representation, but the rom-com in general.

“I just hope people go see romantic-comedies,” Kerstein said. “And hopefully they’ll embrace races that haven’t been there on the screen too much that have basically been there all along.”

“I think this is just the tip of the iceberg,” he added, “and hopefully Hollywood’s gotten the message.”

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crazy rich asians sequel

Crazy Rich Asians is getting a crazy fast sequel. Just a week after the groundbreaking Asian-led romantic-comedy opened in theaters, Warner Bros. is moving forward with a Crazy Rich Asians sequel with director Jon M. Chu and the first film’s writers on board to return.

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crazy rich asians spoiler review

(In our Spoiler Reviews, we take a deep dive into a new release and get to the heart of what makes it tick…and every story point is up for discussion. In this entry: Crazy Rich Asians.)

“China is a sleeping giant. Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will move the world.” That is the rather grandiose Napoleon Bonaparte proverb that Crazy Rich Asians opens with, setting the stage for a wild, escapist fantasy of a film that is both keenly aware and uncaring of the burden it carries. Crazy Rich Asians knows it presents a landmark moment for Asian-Americans in film, and right off the bat, it declares its intentions. It’s a weighty promise for Jon M. Chu’s romantic-comedy to live up to — but does it live up to it? Yes, and no.

On a barebones level, Crazy Rich Asians doesn’t quite shake the world. It’s a romantic-comedy that follows a standard meet-the-parents set-up, with an outrageously wealthy twist. But add in the all-Asian cast and Asian-American heroine, and you’ve got something revolutionary.

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Crazy Rich Asians yellow

The word “yellow” has tons of negative connotations for Asians, but Crazy Rich Asians director Jon M. Chu was determined to reclaim it. And he did it in the most emotional, and slightly tongue-in-cheek way, possible: he included a Mandarin cover of Coldplay’s hit song “Yellow.”

But it took more than a few phone calls to get permission to use the song. Warner Bros. executives were squeamish and Coldplay was reluctant — for good reason. So Chu penned a beautiful, moving letter to Coldplay to convince them to give Crazy Rich Asians the song. And you can now read the lovely letter in full.

Spoilers for Crazy Rich Asians ahead.

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