Breaking Bad - Felina

Think you’re a big fan of Breaking Bad? Jeffrey Katzenberg has you beat. The current CEO of DreamWorks Animation, who also helped Disney return to animated glory in the Nineties, reportedly offered $75 million to the show’s creators for three more episodes of the hit TV show. He wanted to release additional episodes, in segments, online over the course of a month and make people pay for each one. This was, however, before he knew the ending of the series. Read More »


What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 31 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

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Producer Tim Johnson has described the announced sequel for How to Train Your Dragon as “a much bigger movie,” and Dreamworks Animation head Jeffrey Katzenberg stated that the How To Train Your Dragon series will have  “at least three” chapters “maybe more.” Co-director Dean DeBlois explains how the sequel, and future of the series, will expand the story to other worlds.

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What is Page 2? Page 2 is a compilation of stories and news tidbits, which for whatever reason, didn’t make the front page of /Film. After the jump we’ve included 31 different items, fun images, videos, casting tidbits, articles of interest and more. It’s like a mystery grab bag of movie web related goodness. If you have any interesting items that we might’ve missed that you think should go in /Film’s Page 2 – email us!

Read More »

Jeffrey Katzenberg

If you’ve been reading the website for a while then you know my love for indepth long form interviews with actors, filmmakers and producers. /Film reader Joe L informs me that DreamWorks Animation head Jeffrey Katzenberg just appeared on Charlie Rose last week.

I’ve always been fascinated with the history of Disney Animation (and highly reccomend the recent documentary Waking Sleeping Beauty) which Katzenberg headed during the Beauty and the Beast/Lion King boom. I’ve also been reading Nicole LaPorte’s new book The Men Who Would Be King: An Almost Epic Tale of Moguls, Movies, and a Company Called DreamWorks. So this 36-minute interview with Katzenberg hit the right spot.

Katzenberg talks about his Disney years, being fired by Michael Eisner, the formation of DreamWorks, 3D filmmaking, Avatar, his response to Roger Ebert, the future of cinema and downfall of DVD, the failure of DreamWorks, the future of DreamWorks Animation, movies as shared events, a respect for time, his experiences in politics,  . Watch the whole interview now after the jump. And for those of you who don’t want to watch it, you can read a complete transcript at the bottom of this page.

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zz5fb57a161

Former Variety writer Nicole LaPorte has a book coming out in May called “The Men Who Would Be King: An Almost Epic Tale of Moguls, Movies, and a Company Called DreamWorks“. The New York Post has gotten an early look at the book, and has published a listing of some of the more shocking claims.

According to the upcoming hardcover, Steven Spielberg is so paranoid about security at his office that a never-used motorcycle is kept permanently parked outside in case he needs to make a quick escape. Escape? From what? The book claims that the director’s “passion for secrecy sometimes suggests a burgeoning near-paranoia.”

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katzenberg_3d

UPDATE: One of the quotes I used has been pulled out of the article by Variety; I’ve noted it below.

The following is something Dreamworks head Jeffrey Katzenberg may or may not have said in his 3D Summit keynote (I don’t have a full transcript): 3D helps filmmakers tell better stories. But this is what Katzenberg did say: we know people will pay even more for this, and you’re not charging enough for 3D. Still have any illusions that the push toward 3D has any goal other than making money for studios? Read More »

Last week I recieved a mysterious e-mail:

Happy New Year –


please keep a lookout for an exciting announcement crossing the AP Wire this
Sunday, January 4th concerning the new film, MONSTERS VS. ALIENS.
Ooze gonna’ save us in 2009?

I sent a inquiry out to my Twitter followers trying to figure out what the big announcement could be, but got no response. But today ComingSoon recieved a tip revealing all.

Apparently Monsters Vs. Aliens will be the first movie trailer in Superbowl (or maybe even television history?) to be broadcast in 3D. On February 1st, during the Superbowl, the 3D trailer will air. So where do you get the 3D glasses for this experiment? Well, as you might have heard, NBC is also airing a special 3D episode of Chuck later in the month (the trailer is likely to re-air in 3D at that time). Viewers will be instructed to pick up special glasses at any Sobe or Pepsi display at participating retailers to be able to watch the commercial and television show in 3D. I love the idea behind the concept, but the execution is pretty baffling.

Sadly, this is Anaglyphic 3D technology (aka Red eye/Blue eye)  which is 50 year old technology. I’ve heard Jeffrey Katzenberg speak about the dangers of the public’s perception of that old technology. His big pitch is that the new technology is far superior, and that the concept of Anaglyph is holding the 3D movement back. I’ve been a big supporter of DreamWorks Animation’s 3D workflow, and the technology, but this seems backwards, even to me. James Cameron has also been outspoken against studios using Anaglyphic technology for DVD releases.  So it seems strange that Katzenberg would use the old technology to promote the new technology. Almost sad.

Update: Apparently Anaglyphic 3D technology (aka Red eye/Blue eye) will not be employed for this stunt, even though red/blue glasses are shown in the television advertisements. The glasses will use Intel InTru 3D and ColorCode 3-D, and Katzenberg says it will be better than the old anaglphic technology but not anywhere close to that of today’s 3D digital cinema. But from what I understand, ColorCode 3-D is amber and blue lens, and is only a slight improvement on the old Anaglyphic technology.

photo credit tvbythenumbers

Dreamworks May Start Charging $5 Extra for 3D Movies

Variety reported this past week on some important goings-on in the world of 3D at the 3D Entertainment Summit in Century City. Apparently, 3D is the future of cinema (not surprising, given the summit’s title), but there were also some interesting statistics revealed:

  • Despite the growth in the number of 3D screens in America, they consistently generate twice the audience and three times the amount of revenue of 2D screens
  • The 3D screens playing Bolt, Meet the Robinsons, and Chicken Little outperformed their 2D counterparts by 2.5 to 1.
  • For Dreamworks Animation, the cost of making a film into 3D is an extra $15 million

One of the most significant quotes comes from Jeffrey Katzenberg of Dreamworks. According to Katzenberg, 3D is “a premium experience and has the consumer paying a premium price.” Katzenberg stated that Dreamworks will start charging $5 extra for their 3D films starting with Monsters vs. Aliens in 2009.

I’m quite ambivalent about this news. On the one hand, I understand that more work is required for 3D films, both from the producers of a film and from the theaters that must somehow project the images and have the infrastructure in place to distribute glasses, etc. On the other hand, I don’t feel like the quality of the 3D films I’ve seen recently (specifically Bolt and Beowulf which both would have cost me about $10-12), would have motivated me to fork over an extra $5 just to catch them in 3D.

Editors (Peter Sciretta) Note: In San Francisco, most theaters charge a $2.50 surcharge for 3D films, but I’m not sure if that is the case all around the country.

Discuss: Do guys think it’d be worth it?

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

22% of Vanity Fair’s Top 100 are Filmmakers

Vanity Fair has released the VF 100 – an annual listing of the top 100 leaders of the information age. Below you can find a listing of movie related entries on the list. Check out the full list on VanityFair.com.

4. Steve Jobs – Former Pixar CEO, Member of Disney’s Board of Directors
9. Angelina Jolie/Brad Pitt – Actors
14. Steven Spielberg – Director, Producer, Dreamworks co-founder
22. David Geffen – Dremworks Co-founder
23. George Lucas – Writer, Director, Producer, Chairman of LucasFilm
24. Jerry Bruckheimer – Producer
28. John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Brad Bird – Pixar’s creative team
32. Sumner Redstone – Majority Owner of Paramount Pictures
33. Arnold Schwarzenegger – Actor
34. Tom Hanks – Actor, Producer
35. Robert Iger – Head of the Walt Disney Company
43. Oprah Winfrey – Actress (kinda), Producer
44. Jon Stewart – Comedian, Actor
45. Stephen Colbert – Comedian, Actor
53. Jeffrey Katzenberg – Dreamworks co-founder, CEO of Dreamworks Animation
55. George Clooney – Actor, Producer
58. Judd Apatow – Producer, Writer, Director
59. Robert De Niro – Actor, Producer, Director
66. Brian Grazer/Ron Howard – Producer/Director
85. The Coen Brothers – Writers, Directors, Producers
87. The Weinstein Brothers – The Weinstien Co
93. Jerry Weintraub – Producer