Even without taking into account his 30-plus-year acting career—highlighted by performances in Dead Poets Society, Reality Bites, Training Day, and Richard Linklater’s Before trilogy—Ethan Hawke has had a hell of a 2018, which technically began a year ago at the Venice Film Festival), where writer-director Paul Schrader’s First Reformed premiered, featuring a career-best performance from Hawke. The film wasn’t officially released until May 2018, and just recently came out on home video.

Currently, Hawke has two more films making their way across the country in limited release, both of which debuted at the year’s Sundance Film Festival—one he stars in (Juliet, Naked) and one he directed (Blaze). (We could also throw in his extensive interview about Elvis Presley’s flawed acting career in director Eugene Jarecki’s documentary The King, which came out earlier this summer.) Produced by Judd Apatow and directed by Jesse Peretz, Juliet, Naked is the story of a British woman (Rose Byrne) whose boyfriend (Chris O’Dowd) is obsessed with a reclusive singer who had one of the great broken-heart records decades earlier. When Bryne’s character lashes out at a record label releasing demos for said record as being a lame cash grab, the long-silent musician (Hawke) writes her an email confirming her suspicions, and the two begin an online correspondence that has the potential for something more, if for no other reason than it drags him out of hiding. Based on the novel by Nick Hornby, the film is charming, funny and gives Hawke the chance to use images of himself from younger days in very amusing ways.

Read More »

juliet, naked trailer

The summer of Ethan Hawke continues with Juliet, Naked.

Just three months after he played a morose preacher in First Reformed, Hawke is remind us of how much range he has by stepping back into his romantic-comedy leading man shoes. Hawke stars as an aging rock star who romances Rose Byrne, a woman who finds herself at a crossroads after spontaneously publishing a scathing music review. Read More »

blaze trailer

I’ve never heard of Blaze Foley, and perhaps you haven’t either. If that’s the case, Ethan Hawke wants to remedy that with his new film Blaze. Hawke helms the new drama which examines the life of the late country music singer-songwriter, who died in 1989. Watch the Blaze trailer below.

Read More »

the good lord bird

In the era of the flashy McConaissance and the Keanussance, second acts are all the rage in Hollywood. But while no one has dubbed Ethan Hawke one of these Renaissance Men, Hawke has been quietly building one of the most interesting second acts in Hollywood.

After a brief brush with leading man roles in the ’90s and early 2000s, Hawke settled into a career of indie films aided by his inextricable connection to Richard Linklater’s Before trilogy. Then came a curious pivot to horror. In 2012, Hawke starred in the Blumhouse production Sinister, a critically acclaimed SXSW favorite that would help aid Blumhouse’s rise from low-budget indie studio to today’s go-to horror company. Now, Hawke is teaming up with Blumhouse again, but this time for a small-screen adaptation of The Good Lord Bird.

Read More »

stockholm review

Stockholm syndrome has inherently horrifying roots: Victims of kidnappings, hostage situations, and other dangerous situations somehow develop feelings of sympathy, maybe even affection, for their captors. But that doesn’t mean that a feature film adaptation of the 1973 bank robbery that originated the term can’t be outright hilarious.

Stockholm, which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 19, feels like such an irreverent black comedy that you wouldn’t expect it to be based on real-life events. But its stranger-than-fiction premise only serves to heighten everything — the emotions, the absurdity, and the sympathy for its central robber played with a zany, unhinged verve by the scene-stealing Ethan Hawke.

Read More »

First Reformed Trailer

A24 has become one of those names that always has your attention. We sometimes don’t hear about their movies much until the trailers start rolling in, and then we’re totally on board. And that’s exactly how we feel about their forthcoming release from Paul Schrader, best known for writing Taxi Driver and directing a slew of dark and often deranged thrillers.

First Reformed follows Ethan Hawke as a priest who is becoming more and more disillusioned with humanity as his congregation dwindles and the world around him becomes more and more troubling. The clergyman suddenly finds himself taking matters into his own hands as he grows impatient waiting for God to do something. Read More »

Juliet Naked review

If there’s one popular writer who knows his way around stories of shaky romance and an almost unhealthy obsession with music, it’s Nick Hornby. So it should come as no surprise that Juliet, Naked the latest film adaptation from the author of the source material behind High Fidelity and About A Boy – is replete with heartbreak, missed romantic opportunities, longing for connection and more in-depth analysis of music than you could ever want or need. More specifically, the music in question come from fictional ’90s musician Tucker Crowe (Ethan Hawke), who put out one of the greatest broken-heart records of all time entitled Juliet 25 years earlier, before vanishing from public life. Read More »

24 hours to live trailer

Sometimes, there are just too many trailers. It’s difficult to give each one a fair shake, but it’s our duty to report to you, the readers, all the entertainment news we can. And that includes trailers. So when some trailers slip through the crack, we break out the lasso and round them all up in one helpful spot. So look below for a trailer roundup of 24 Hours to Live, I Love You America, The Chi, Miracle on 42nd Street, Sweet Virginia, Angelica, and Princess Cyd.

Read More »

First Reformed Review

We’ve quietly entered a renaissance of master American filmmakers tackling religious subjects with the gravity, dignity and seriousness they deserve. Add Paul Schrader’s latest movie First Reformed to a growing list of modern masterpieces on faith through hardship that includes Martin Scorsese’s Silence, Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life, the Coen Brothers’ A Serious Man and James Gray’s The Immigrant.

Read our full First Reformed review from TIFF below. Read More »

Cool Posts From Around the Web:

Luc Besson interview

When filmmaker Luc Besson was 10 years old, he was reading the comic book he’d adapt into a massive feature film 48 years later. Based on Pierre Christin and artist Jean-Claude Mézières‘ “Ambassador of Shadows,” published in 1975, Besson has brought their colorful, wacky world to to the big screen with his personal touch on every frame. From the complex, clever set pieces to the jokes to the colorful environments, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets is pure Besson.

In a race against the clock, Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and Laureline (Cara Delevingne) will have to save the city of Alpha, where alien species from all over the galaxy come together to share knowledge. The world feels endless, full of all sorts of aliens, characters, and environments. It took many years it took to build this world piece-by-piece, and the French director behind La Femme Nikita and The Fifth Element recently told us about the process.

Below, check out our Luc Besson interview.

Read More »